October 2018 Reading Thread

dannymcg

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Just started a reread Watership Down ahead of the new series adaptation. I read it when I was 11 so my memory of is a bit fuzzy in places. It's wonderfully written though, it grabs you right from the start.
I never thought of reading it (Huh, bunnies! it's a kid's book) until I read The Stand by Stephen King. He rambles on about going tharn and I thought "ok, I'll try that".
As you say - it grabs you :)
 

Hugh

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Just started a reread Watership Down ahead of the new series adaptation. I read it when I was 11 so my memory of is a bit fuzzy in places. It's wonderfully written though, it grabs you right from the start.
I've always been surprised when people are keen on Watership Down, so it's interesting to hear it's wonderfully written. My problem with it was that it came out just after I'd finished my first year of a politics course which had involved looking at the political systems of different theorists over the years, and Watership Down seemed to have been lifted straight out of the politics course. Maybe I'm one of those people who just didn't like it.
 

Vince W

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I've always been surprised when people are keen on Watership Down, so it's interesting to hear it's wonderfully written. My problem with it was that it came out just after I'd finished my first year of a politics course which had involved looking at the political systems of different theorists over the years, and Watership Down seemed to have been lifted straight out of the politics course. Maybe I'm one of those people who just didn't like it.
I'd suggest giving it another go sometime. You've probably had enough distance between you and that course by now.
 

hitmouse

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Rereading The Cunning Man by Robertson Davies.

I took it off the shelf to lend it to a friend and thought I would check out the first chapter. It has been at least 10 years. Still havent put the book down.
 

Parson

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Finished Time Traders by Andre Norton and the second half was indeed a very big disappointment. It read like a book you would write when you didn't have time to do it properly, or you didn't much care. It was also interesting, especially after what was said up thread about "Reds" changed to Russians. That term actually plays pretty well in today's charging atmosphere. I've now started Red Angel Book 1. So far so good.
 

tobl

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finished the new tom kratman in the carrera series. man i love action. and carrera… the guy is a son of a bitch but hey sometimes we need one
 

vanye

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I'm having a try at something a bit deep today.
Two hours so far simply trying to get my head around the introduction to "Thus Spake Zarathustra"
I've a feeling it'll be a long long journey through this...I'll be dipping in it for months, heavy going.

My brain hurts
I found that Zarathustra spoke more to my imagination than intellect, if that makes sense. It sketches pictures rather than say something meaningful. But the pictures convey something, if tentatively. A lot like some of the best r.e.m. songs, really.

So just relax and let yourself ease into it. You‘ll be fine!
 

Fedos

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Today I finished two books: The Gathering Storm book twelve of The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson and The Warrior Prophet book two of The Prince of Nothing series by R. Scott Bakker, both decidedly different reads but worthy in their own unique ways.

I'll start with The Gathering Storm. This was the first book in The Wheel of Time series that Sanderson had a hand in and I think I was able to pick up on certain characteristics of his style in the book (having read the first two books in the original Mistborn trilogy and working on the third as of this moment). And while I wouldn't rank this book up there with my two shared favorites so far of the series (The Eye of the World and The Great Hunt) I can definitely sense that events are coming to a head and it did have its moments, which is a relief based on the plodding nature of the later Jordan books in the series.

The Warrior Prophet
proved to be a thrilling ride however and I'm glad I reengaged with this series after having read The Darkness that Comes Before a couple of times but never actually pushing on to its sequels. I enjoy the way that R. Scott Bakker weaves philosophy into these books--even though, perhaps, my favorite fantastic example of this technique is Steven Erikson--and the concepts Bakker has running through this series--such as the competing schools of sorcery and the Consult and No God all written on the backdrop of a Holy War--have resonated with me a great deal. I could easily see Bakker vaulted to become one of my favorite fantasy authors if this keeps up.

Next I'm onto Towers of Midnight, book thirteen in The Wheel of Time and The Thousandfold Thought book three in The Prince of Nothing.
 

Parson

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Finished Red Angel: Book I: Smugglers by C.R. Daems -- liked it pretty well. It is however clear that his story borrowed extensively from the Honor Harrington well. Interesting Daems was 70 years old when he published his first book and now a few years later he has about 10 books in print and judging from the number of people who rated them is doing pretty well, thank you. I am now Red Angel: Book II: Raiders.
 

Hugh

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Jack Vance "Ports of Call" and it's sequel "Lurulu".
I think these are his last two books, published in his 80s. It's impressive how some writers remain creative so long. These centre on the wry philosophical musings of four crewmen of a space freighter plying its trade among the more out of the way planets of the Gaean Reach, the beers that they drink, and the various subplots and passengers (religious pilgrims, a troupe of mouse-rider dancers) that they encounter.
 

Paul_C

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Finished The Smoke by Simon Ings - I liked it, though it felt a little light and sketchy in places.

Next is one that's has already been read (and rejected ;) ) in this thread - Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel
 

Happy Joe

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Couldn't find any think that tweaked my fancy; so I'm rereading Norton's Time Traders (Baen edition)...thanks to Parson's posts.
...Its been at least 20 years since the last time I read this book; might have to do the whole series, 7 books (I think) again...

Enjoy!
 

Rodders

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I read the first book a few years ago and rather enjoyed it. Having just started playing the game, I thought I'd pick up on the rest of the trilogy.
 

Paul_C

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Changed my mind as I'm not a huge post-apocalypse fan, which Station Eleven appears to be, I'll pick it up again another time.

I'm visiting my old Dad, which gives me plenty of time to read, and as a consequence I'm 3/4 of the way through the second Southern Reach book, Authority.
 

Extollager

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Reread Robert Coates's "The Hour After Westerly" from the New Yorker magazine (1947) and Ray Bradbury's "The Man Upstairs" from The October Country. Bradbury reprinted the Coates in Timeless Stories for Today and Tomorrow. It's non-supernatural but has the feel of a good old Twilight Zone scenario. Happy Reformation Day, er, Hallowe'en!
 
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