Your favorite crazy cult film?

Al Jackson

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#1
cult-films.png


Some people like Pink Flamingos or Eraserhead.
For me it a film called Andy Warhols Bad.
This film is understated , nothing outwardly seems exactly strange until you get into the plot.
Carol Baker runs a electrolysis parlor in her kitchen and a sort of boarding house.
She really has a all-female hit squad for doing little dirty jobs.
People pay to have like a cafe restroom trashed, or wronged by a mechanic his thumb cut off, or an obnoxious woman gets a contract on a guys dog because she does not like him walking it! All hits are by women.
Baker has a daughter who she drives crazy and who has an ugly baby.
She hires Perry King because some woman want's her autistic child killed!
This film (not made by Andy Warhol , just used his name to finance the movie) moves quietly from one insane situation to the next.
Not like any film you have ever seen. It's nuts!
 
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Anthoney

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#3
I've always liked A Boy and His Dog. It was Don Johnson's first major film role. A post apocalyptic, after the 5th world war story about a boy and his telepathic, highly intelligent dog.

The think the animated film Wizards counts as a crazy cult film. Now that I think about it Wizars is also sort of post apocalyptic. Very trippy.
 
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#5
Oh, yeah. I'm a fan of the early John Waters films; but the most obscure, funniest weird movie has to be Greasers' Palace. Greaser's Palace (1972) - IMDb The blurb is lame and fails to make the point; but note that Dr Sydney Freeman is the Christ figure, in a Zoot Suit. A deliciously bizarre bit of filmaking.

The most obscure cult film, ever, has to be Ganjasaurus Rex. It doesn't make a lot of sense, unless you have lived in the "Emerald Triangle" for 30 or 40 years. Then the script is Brilliant; even if the photography is handheld- on-cheap-equipment. Ganjasaurus Rex (Video 1987) - IMDb
 
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Al Jackson

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#6
I've always liked A Boy and His Dog. It was Don Johnson's first major film role. A post apocalyptic, after the 5th world war story about a boy and his telepathic, highly intelligent dog.

The think the animated film Wizards counts as a crazy cult film. Now that I think about it Wizars is also sort of post apocalyptic. Very trippy.
A Boy and His Dog may be , the only, or one of the few, films that uses a story of Harlan Ellison's. Ellison approved and gave permission to L Q Jones to make the film.
(Ellison did not write the screenplay , not sure why.)
It is a zany story. Actually A Boy and His Dog is a science fiction movie, and it is pretty good. It is a kind of Twilight Zone--ish
story ... like The Incredible Shrinking Man.... these two films (a few other SF films like them) are rarely mentioned in a list of good science fiction films.
 

Al Jackson

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#8
Anything by Alejandro Jodorowsky: El Topo, The Holly Mountain, Tusk and Santa Sangre.
I can't say all it works but sure is about as crackers and any films i know of.
I love Santa Sangre about an armless knife thrower! You read that right.

Tell glad Jordorowsky did not make DUNE ... when his money backer realized what was going on he dropped Alejandro.
 

HoopyFrood

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#9
Riki-Oh: The Story of Ricky. Absolute mad film, with over the top violence, awful effects and a bizarre script. Needs to be watched with both subs and dubs because both are hilariously bad. I love it.
 

Rodders

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#10
Does Blade Runner still count as a cult film?

Aside from that, i have a real soft spot for Lynch's Dune. It's not without fault, but it's a great effort in my opinion and it pains me when people criticize it.
 

Al Jackson

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#12
Does Blade Runner still count as a cult film?

Aside from that, i have a real soft spot for Lynch's Dune. It's not without fault, but it's a great effort in my opinion and it pains me when people criticize it.
Lynch went from Eraserhead to Elephant Man to DUNE to Blue Velvet.
Elephant Man is great film one might say conventional , with 8 Oscar nominations.
DUNE is conventional High Space Opera , tho Lynch was really twisty with some of the stuff.
DUNE has a super cast , showing Lynch had an eye that, and production design Lynch seemed to have a Ridley Scott* sense for that. Lynch was dissatisfied at the time with the screenplay , even tho he wrote it, and in these later years Lynch has said he would have never attempted it. Still DUNE seems conventional science fiction
Blue Velvet is like and upscale Eraserhead (different narrative from that film) , defiantly a cult film.
Lynch sort of stayed in that groove.

*Ridley Scott was to direct the DUNE. His story is that he dropped out to deal because of the death of his brother. There is a story that Scott turned in a screenplay that so mangled the Frank Herbert novel that producer Raffaella De Laurentiis fired Scott on the spot. Scott never mentions this story.
 
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#15
Back in the 70s I was a big fan of new director-on-the-block, David Cronenberg just before he hit the big time with his seminal "Videodrome" and "The Fly" (both very good, but far more mainstream compared to his earlier stuff)

Schlock horror B-films like, "Scanners", "Rabid" and "Shivers" - all of them low budget with iffy sfx, but had a very strong appeal to my teenage eyes (I used to sneak into the cinema underage at the time). And even today all three films remain firm favourites for those rare weekend gatherings with like-minded friends, alcohol and dodgy takeaways!
 

Al Jackson

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#17
Back in the 70s I was a big fan of new director-on-the-block, David Cronenberg just before he hit the big time with his seminal "Videodrome" and "The Fly" (both very good, but far more mainstream compared to his earlier stuff)

Schlock horror B-films like, "Scanners", "Rabid" and "Shivers" - all of them low budget with iffy sfx, but had a very strong appeal to my teenage eyes (I used to sneak into the cinema underage at the time). And even today all three films remain firm favourites for those rare weekend gatherings with like-minded friends, alcohol and dodgy takeaways!
I loved those Cronenberg early horror films, they broke rules , undercut my expectations.
Videodrome is even a little more out-there than those.
One seemingly cannot make films like Cronenberg any more the MPAA ratings seem to kill the box-office, also a Hard R is not the same Hard R it used to be!!
Recent horror films seems too conventional to me. IT had a big success at the box office and I found the found story flat with no surprises.
My sense of things is there is a market for unconventional adult horror like Cronenberg but it don't even see it on the streaming venue , I mean I see approximations but nothing that really pushes the envelope , it's a puzzle.
 

M. Robert Gibson

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#19
Peter Jackson's incredible debut Bad Taste
I've still got that on VHS (y)

One of the problems I have is what constitutes a 'cult' film.
For instance I enjoy The Rocky Horror Picture Show and Hair and Cabaret for a bit of a musical interlude. But are they 'cult'

For a bit of escapism Time Bandits.
Some dark humour in the form of The Rise and Rise of Michael Rimmer.

For some sci-fi how about Dark Star or The Final Programme.

But for something totally off the beaten track give me Sir Henry at Rawlinson End.

And that concludes MRG's desert island videos. Thanks for listening.
 

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