Harlan Ellison, 1934-2018

Cat's Cradle

Time, now, to read...
Supporter
Joined
Mar 3, 2014
Messages
2,294
#3
Wow...just, wow. RIP to an innovative thinker and writer, and a man who took great pleasure in (lovingly) pestering Isaac Asimov at SF conventions.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

Vegetarian Werewolf
Joined
Dec 9, 2012
Messages
5,294
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA
#5
I saw Mister Ellison speak several times, and spoke to him briefly when he was sitting in the window of A Change of Hobbit bookstore writing a story each day. (Despite all those "Harlan Ellison stories," he was very pleasant to me.) I have been waiting for "The Last Dangerous Visions" since 1972. Alas.
 

Droflet

I don't teach chickens how to dance.
Joined
Apr 15, 2010
Messages
2,786
Location
Australia
#6
He hooked me with Deathbird stories and I've been a fan ever since. Indeed, another giant has fallen.
 

2DaveWixon

Shocked and Appalled!
Joined
Mar 13, 2016
Messages
3,350
Location
Minnesota
#7
A few years back Harlan gave me permission to take back -- that is, for the estates of Cliff Simak and Gordy Dickson to take back -- the stories each of them had written for THE LAST DANGEROUS VISIONS.
Harlan still had hopes that somehow, the anthology would come out at last -- but he acknowledged that the estates of both men had rights to their stories; so he returned the rights, and I got the Simak story published a few years ago.
In that Simak collection, I acknowledged Harlan's generosity, giving him profuse thanks.
I'm glad I did.
 

johnnyjet

Western PA High Tech Country Boy
Joined
Nov 11, 2011
Messages
1,420
Location
Pennsylvania
#9
RIP Harlan Ellison - One of my early favorite authors and one of the most notorious as well. But certainly one of the greats. I've been waiting for The Last Dangerous Visions for a long time myself.
 

dask

dark and stormy knight
Joined
Nov 1, 2008
Messages
3,244
Location
Pacific Northwest
#10
Now it seems like they're really all gone. Like John Wayne I never thought it'd happen. Extremely saddened by this extreme loss. Farewell Mr. Ellison.
 

Brian G Turner

Fantasist & Futurist
Staff member
Supporter
Joined
Nov 23, 2002
Messages
21,956
Location
Highlands
#13

Jo Zebedee

Aliens vs Belfast. http://jozebedee.com/newsletter
Supporter
Joined
Oct 5, 2011
Messages
16,376
Location
blah - flags. So many flags.
#14
I’m going to sound like such a grouch here. But to read all the eulogies without also recognising the more challenging side of Ellison feels odd. The Hugo incident with Connie Wills, for instance. He was irascible and challenging (as well as brilliant) and yet these eulogies seem to belong to someone different from who he was...
 

Cat's Cradle

Time, now, to read...
Supporter
Joined
Mar 3, 2014
Messages
2,294
#15
You're right Jo. I greatly admire his writing, but irascible-challenging should be remembered right along with brilliant. He was a complicated, whirlwind of a person. I'd never read of the Willis incident - that's pretty darn offensive.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

Vegetarian Werewolf
Joined
Dec 9, 2012
Messages
5,294
Location
Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA
#17
What is the Willis incident?
From Wikipedia:

Ellison was presented with a special committee award at the 2006 Hugo Awards ceremony. His onstage behavior was bizarre, including sucking on a microphone and culminating in his groping Connie Willis' breast. Ellison subsequently complained that Willis refused to acknowledge his apology.
Here is an account of the incident, with Ellison's response quoted at length.

At Long Last, Harlan, Have YouLeft No Sense of Decency?
 

Hugh

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Mar 27, 2016
Messages
612
#19
Times change and I change.

Back in the early 1970s when I read “Dangerous Visions” I hung onto the brilliant Harlan Ellison’s every word. Forty five years later, I read "Again Dangerous Visions" and found most of it exceptionally poor, and I particularly disliked Ellison's own introductions and his apparent constant need for drama. I'm afraid the same goes for those short stories of his that I've read: I found them impressively powerful and shocking at the time, but now prefer not to read them

While we all have our struggles of one kind or another, I do think it must have been particularly difficult being Harlan Ellison.
 

BAYLOR

There Are Always new Things to Learn.
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
13,949
#20
Times change and I change.

Back in the early 1970s when I read “Dangerous Visions” I hung onto the brilliant Harlan Ellison’s every word. Forty five years later, I read "Again Dangerous Visions" and found most of it exceptionally poor, and I particularly disliked Ellison's own introductions and his apparent constant need for drama. I'm afraid the same goes for those short stories of his that I've read: I found them impressively powerful and shocking at the time, but now prefer not to read them

While we all have our struggles of one kind or another, I do think it must have been particularly difficult being Harlan Ellison.
In my case, I can reread all of stuff with no issues . What I liked most about his stories is they made for uncomfortable reading , they made you think about things . Make the reader think and I think that I can safely assume that was one of his motivations for writing. He was a teacher and that was how he taught. I learned a great deal from reading his stories,introductions and essays. Harlan Ellison was one writer that im glad I discovered.

The intro in Dangerous Vision with him and Asimov still cracks me up every time I read it . He played gotcha on Asimov and Asimov nailed him with his own gothcha the next day . They ended up becoming very good friends.
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

Top