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Anthoney

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Did all the other Klingon aesthetic changes not also bother you?
If you are asking about the current changes then yes. If you are talking about changing it from TOS then yes again. That is until Worf acknowledged that the other look had existed but Klingons don't talk about it. It was them saying "We're not trying to erase the past". Later during one of Enterprise's better story arcs they fully explained what had happened and how. It wasn't perfect but they made an effort.
 

BAYLOR

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If you are asking about the current changes then yes. If you are talking about changing it from TOS then yes again. That is until Worf acknowledged that the other look had existed but Klingons don't talk about it. It was them saying "We're not trying to erase the past". Later during one of Enterprise's better story arcs they fully explained what had happened and how. It wasn't perfect but they made an effort.
I do think it might have been been helpful had Discovery kept the look of the Klingons of the Next Generation. :(
 
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Onyx

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If you are asking about the current changes then yes. If you are talking about changing it from TOS then yes again. That is until Worf acknowledged that the other look had existed but Klingons don't talk about it. It was them saying "We're not trying to erase the past". Later during one of Enterprise's better story arcs they fully explained what had happened and how. It wasn't perfect but they made an effort.
Then maybe your answer is contained in Worf's response - that Klingon's did something radical to look more like Romulons sometime before TOS, and they partially un-did whatever that was later on, but Discovery shows their starting point.

That said, Klingons changed radically between TOS and Search for Spock, which isn't much more time than that between Discovery and TOS - much less than the lifetime of an Klingon.
 

BAYLOR

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There's still the issue of the how the Klingons looked in the original series which takes place about 100 years or so after Enterprise the incident happened which changed the Klingons to more humanlike appearance. Kang, Koloth and Koor looked Human in the original series and yet in DS9 their apreance was altered radically in their old age. And now in Discovery which is a prequel they were radically changed again. Again, it goes back to the 1979 film which began that disconnect.
 
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Onyx

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There's still the issue of the how the Klingons looked in the original series which takes place about 100 years or so after Enterprise the incident happened which changed the Klingons to more humanlike appearance. Kang, Koloth and Koor looked Human in the original series and yet in DS9 their apreance was altered radically in their old age. And now in Discovery which is a prequel they were radically changed again. Again, it goes back to the 1979 film which began that disconnect.
And then there's the Kahless problem. But adult Klingons changing radically in appearance during individuals' lifetimes is biologically unlikely - what kind of virus could cause bones in the skull of an adult to grow just between 2270 and 2285?

At a certain point you have to accept that some of the things you're seeing are not perfect aesthetic recreations of previous shows, but aesthetic revisions made by production people. Which are essentially visual ret-cons, even if individual episodes have tried to deal with them. And maybe someone will make an episode that explains why Starfleet goes through so many uniform changes between Dis, TOS, MP and Khan, given that is only 25 years.


If anything, these sort of aesthetic ret-cons are a hallmark of the Star Trek franchise. Look at the NC-1701's engine rooms. It is the result of continuing a series that started with relatively primitive effects and then deciding to elevate it to the realism standard set in the '70s. Series like Bladerunner, Alien, Star Wars, 2001, etc haven't had to deal with this because they looked realistic from the get go.
 
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BAYLOR

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And then there's the Kahless problem. But adult Klingons changing radically in appearance during individuals' lifetimes is biologically unlikely - what kind of virus could cause bones in the skull of an adult to grow just between 2270 and 2285?

At a certain point you have to accept that some of the things you're seeing are not perfect aesthetic recreations of previous shows, but aesthetic revisions made by production people. Which are essentially visual ret-cons, even if individual episodes have tried to deal with them. And maybe someone will make an episode that explains why Starfleet goes through so many uniform changes between Dis, TOS, MP and Khan, given that is only 25 years.


If anything, these sort of aesthetic ret-cons are a hallmark of the Star Trek franchise. Look at the NC-1701's engine rooms.
Every ship had their own unique uniform badge , for example The Doomsday Machine(season 2) Commodore Decker has different emblem then Enterprise , and so does Captain Tracy and his crew in The Omega Glory (season 2) but, in the episode The Court Marshall(season1) , everybody on the Stafleet base has the same uniform emblem as the Enterprise.
 

Anthoney

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adult Klingons changing radically in appearance during individuals' lifetimes is biologically unlikely - what kind of virus could cause bones in the skull of an adult to grow just between 2270 and 2285?

Klingons always had bumpy foreheads. Their attempted to use stuff from the human eugenics program to enhance themselves mutated them into the more human looking form. Sometime after TOS a way to reverse the mutation was found.

That's the canon answer (more or less). So there is answer for the major shift on appearance. They never tried to say that TOS look didn't exist. What they are doing now is with this change is saying that the look that was basically used for 25 seasons never happened. It's not just an updated look with better fake hair or head bumps. It's a complete change. Can you imagine one of these new Klingons making out with Jadzia Dax? I hope not.
 

Onyx

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Klingons always had bumpy foreheads. Their attempted to use stuff from the human eugenics program to enhance themselves mutated them into the more human looking form. Sometime after TOS a way to reverse the mutation was found.

That's the canon answer (more or less). So there is answer for the major shift on appearance. They never tried to say that TOS look didn't exist. What they are doing now is with this change is saying that the look that was basically used for 25 seasons never happened. It's not just an updated look with better fake hair or head bumps. It's a complete change. Can you imagine one of these new Klingons making out with Jadzia Dax? I hope not.
It is "cannon" because several years after the change was made in 1985, someone at least referenced it and then offered an explanation 20 years after that. So now it is cannon. And when they want to reference and make the DIS change to cannon 20 years from now, they'll do so. It is not exactly a tight system. You are complaining the same way someone leaving Search for Spock would have.

Every ship had their own unique uniform badge , for example The Doomsday Machine(season 2) Commodore Decker has different emblem then Enterprise , and so does Captain Tracy and his crew in The Omega Glory (season 2) but, in the episode The Court Marshall(season1) , everybody on the Stafleet base has the same uniform emblem as the Enterprise.
What does that have to do with my post?
 

BAYLOR

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It is "cannon" because several years after the change was made in 1985, someone at least referenced it and then offered an explanation 20 years after that. So now it is cannon. And when they want to reference and make the DIS change cannon 20 years from now, they'll do so. It is not exactly a tight system.


What does that have to do with my post?
You were talking about the uniforms in Trek. I was pointing out an inconstancy in the original series with regard to Uniforms. Also the crew of Discovery is wearing the Enterprise Emblem as well. I forgot about that one. :(
 

Onyx

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You were talking about the uniforms in Trek. I was pointing out an inconstancy in the original series with regard to Uniforms. Also the crew of Discovery is wearing the Enterprise Emblem as well. I forgot about that one. :(
I was talking about the uniforms, not the badges. But this is more evidence that ST has never been all that tight to cannon continuity.
 

dannymcg

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It's Star Trek.
Doesn't matter about little continuity changes.
It's Star Trek.
The coolest space thing to ever grace our screens.

Earliest known photo of the scale model of the Enterprise (Los Angeles 1965)

ca9b9d92c759ac37070576602dd8c211.jpg
 
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Anthoney

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I'd hang it in my sitting room. Nobody ever sits there so it would be perfect. Right next to my life sized Gowron and my real fake klingon bat'leth.
 
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