Are we doing it all wrong...?

CTRandall

I have my very own plant pot!
Supporter
Joined
Jan 4, 2018
Messages
326
Location
North-east England
#46
When superceded by new tech, older technologies rarely just disappear (with the exception, perhaps, of beepers :) Often they will exist side-by-side, sometimes for centuries, as each finds its own niche. Horse-drawn buggies, for instance, are still used widely, sometimes as entertainment and sometimes as transport, depending on location and culture.

Video/audio/haptics might replace some of the functions of reading but they are not going to take over all of them any time soon.
 

Juliana

Juliana Spink Mills. "No capes!"
Supporter
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Messages
4,421
Location
Connecticut, USA
#47
@Montero when we moved to the States, my kids' teachers were thrilled that my Brazilian-educated children wrote in cursive because it was being phased out in elementary school, and not taught/encouraged at all in middle school and high school!

As for the discussion, my teen daughter spends most of her time on YouTube, even though she'd a keen reader and does love books. Though I agree with what others have said; at the moment it's probably best used for promo things like chapter readings or other shortish videos that might help build a fan base. With recent policy changes, currently even pro YouTubers with many thousands of followers are having trouble with revenue.

A book blogger I know said she wished there were more videos where the author actually tells us about their book/series, with small tidbits like their inspiration for it, what it's all about, their favorite character, etc. instead of book trailers. I quite like that idea and it's going on my list of things to do once I'm ready to get back into promoting.

I put me reading ch 1 of IC2 up on my Facebook page yesterday - it’s doing okay for views. I might upload it to my YouTube channel (yes I have one, promo obsessed me) later and share to Twitter
Link? Tried to find but couldn't...
 

Stephen Palmer

author of novels
Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2009
Messages
4,235
Location
Shropshire
#48
It's not necessarily meaningful to compare what happened 25 years ago with what's happening now.
Not only is there far more product out there now, there's far more people noticing it. The internet has fractured what was a solid (albeit incredibly conservative, London-centric and male-dominated) industry. But that fracturing just means you have to find your own fragment rather than deal with the whole thing.
 

Montero

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2008
Messages
2,067
#50
I have a feeling this (audio) will be the major component of publishing soon.
It means authors are going to have to consider the implications for their writing style.
I have noticed that some authors don't work very well read aloud, that some are better for it, but the majority are OK with either.

I couldn't originally get into Lindsey Davis's Falco, even though it was my kind of book. Listened to one on audio and since then they've worked for me as well when reading.

There is also whether you listen to audio books while you do something else, or sit down and just listen to the book. I generally only listen to audio books while decorating, and I find that they have to either be something I've already read, or at the slower paced end of what I read, because I cannot process the story at top speed while also painting. (And no jokes about walking and chewing gum at the same time, thank you - oh and I went for the polite version :) )
 

Overread

Direwolf of the chrons
Joined
Aug 22, 2007
Messages
3,642
Location
Hunting in the woods
#51
I think nearly any story based book should work when read, though of course a lot will depend on the skill of the reader. Some readers will make books come alive, others will either be flat, boring or just won't capture the story in the right way. I would also agree that some books will even benefit from it, which is not to say that they are impossible to read, but that being read aloud brings them to life in a way that reading doesn't quite capture (which is part going to come down to the readers skill and voice).


I wouldn't expect reading to vanish and would expect audio to be complimentary to written books; though we might well see the digital market adapt to a continual rise in audiobooks by making audiobooks the default purchase with a digital written version being bundled into the deal at the same time (two for one!).

I can't in any way see reading vanishing though - first up its integral to society so its unlikely to vanish; though the word structure will change over time (as it always has*). I'd also say that when it comes to books reading is likely going to remain a strong element for many. Audio books change the experience and, as said above, some books are easier to digest the story when you can pause; read back a few times; check something; take it at a slower pace etc... Also the nature of audio often being an accompanying element to life means that there's a high chance of missing larger chunks of the story as life distracts you as you do other things at the same time. With reading that can happen too, but to a lesser extend I would say (as you are more likely to only read rather than do two or three things at once)



Stephan is very right in that the internet and ebooks have thrust books out of their once very controlled past. Publishers no longer hold all the cards; self publishing is no longer the domain of the richer-unskilled writer (one could say vanity writers); market reach is now far more evenly spread (get your ebook on amazon and you've got the market).
However yes the market is very confusing right now; there are no more gatekeepers who are easy to spot, save for the traditional publishers. Say what we might a traditional publisher at least achieves a minimum standard of writing at a technical level; and a standard of product in what they sell**.
Youtubers, twitterers, good reads and more - I fully expect over the next years to come we will see a rise in reviewers and resources geared toward hunting down the quality books on the market and delivering them to the market in the form of articles; podcasts; videos etc... Indeed its already started, but I'd say its got a way to go yet.


*though one hopes that leet and texting language never becomes the standard ;)

**although many still utterly fail to produce well transcribed ebooks - reading though several newer ebook versions of David Gemmel's work and there are a LOT of spoken parts which start without " denoting the opening of speech; its easy to spot, but it does sit there as a continual annoyance.
 

Stephen Palmer

author of novels
Supporter
Joined
Dec 22, 2009
Messages
4,235
Location
Shropshire
#52
There is also whether you listen to audio books while you do something else, or sit down and just listen to the book. I generally only listen to audio books while decorating, and I find that they have to either be something I've already read, or at the slower paced end of what I read, because I cannot process the story at top speed while also painting. (And no jokes about walking and chewing gum at the same time, thank you - oh and I went for the polite version :) )
For me it's always sit down and listen intently. I've found I missed more than I expected when reading.
 

Parson

This world is not my home
Supporter
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
7,390
Location
Iowa
#54
There is also whether you listen to audio books while you do something else, or sit down and just listen to the book. I generally only listen to audio books while decorating, and I find that they have to either be something I've already read, or at the slower paced end of what I read, because I cannot process the story at top speed while also painting.
I find the best time for listening is when I am going for my morning walk (roughly 60 min.) but I also listen while I drive. However, I've found that it does distract me so if the driving is challenging in some way (traffic, weather, strange roads) I try to shut off the book. --- Incidentally, having a blue tooth headphone on also helps hugely when your phone rings while you are driving.

In case anyone is interested audiobooks are about 5% of the market currently.
I'm actually surprised it's this low. Audio books seem to me to be the growth part of the plublishing industry. ---- I refuse to call "adult coloring books" as a true part of the "publishing industry."
 

Kylara

Ghosting
Joined
Jul 16, 2012
Messages
1,620
#55
It is a growing sector. I think ebooks are 13% of the industry, so it is catching up. Ebooks have plateaued but audiobooks are growing.
Interesting fact - more men listen than women and young men are the largest growing group!
 

Parson

This world is not my home
Supporter
Joined
Oct 11, 2006
Messages
7,390
Location
Iowa
#56
Interesting fact - more men listen than women and young men are the largest growing group!

That is a stunning statistic! Young men the largest growing group in a literary endeavor seems unlikely, unless their previous presence was negligible.
 

Juliana

Juliana Spink Mills. "No capes!"
Supporter
Joined
Jun 28, 2012
Messages
4,421
Location
Connecticut, USA
#58
young men are the largest growing group
Something interesting that we've been noticing in the library teen room I work in is that here in the USA, with the current 'trend' in doctors mandating concussion rest for kids and teenagers, parents are coming in to pick up audiobooks for their children, since when you're on concussion rest you usually can't read or watch TV or anything. We've allocated more of our budget toward audiobooks than before. So it's not just commuters, etc, but also a rise in teens/preteens.
 
Joined
Apr 23, 2018
Messages
10
Location
Edmonton
#60
The youth of today are all over YouTube. (And Snapchat because they can talk and parents can't see the naughty things they're saying.) YouTube is definitely an underrated marketing channel for authors. Book trailers are good. Better: get online and talk about your book in person. People love that connection. It feels personal.

But, for goodness sakes, if you're going to appear in pics or video, look your best while doing it. Beer-stained sweats are a no-no. Unless that's your audience.
 

Similar threads

Top