Old Tech thread

Danny McG

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I saw this online but unfortunately no dates were given, the blurb said
"The same place 58 years later, picture two has more processing"
FB_IMG_1700900092711.jpg
 

mosaix

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I saw this online but unfortunately no dates were given, the blurb said
"The same place 58 years later, picture two has more processing"
View attachment 112642
In all probability the Elliot was one of the 803 range. Those machines had film storage instead of tape.

Of course magnetic tape became the mass storage of choice but who could have guessed how quickly discs took over.
 

Vertigo

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In all probability the Elliot was one of the 803 range. Those machines had film storage instead of tape.

Of course magnetic tape became the mass storage of choice but who could have guessed how quickly discs took over.
We were still using tapes on board survey ships in the mid '80s. Big(ish) winchester drives were just coming in but they couldn't take the movement of the ship. I remember when we were finally shown a winchester drive that could be moved (slowly and very carefully) whilst being accessed and were gobsmacked but they still couldn't take the g forces of a ship in a moderate sea. I don't think we got them onto the ships until the late '80s.
 

KiraAnn

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Was bubble memory ever considered for use on such ships?
The US Navy was using magnetic core memories in the early 70's and tape for larger amounts of storage.

Nice thing about magcore was you could lose power and when it came back, you did not have to reboot - just start the processing.
 

Vertigo

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The US Navy was using magnetic core memories in the early 70's and tape for larger amounts of storage.

Nice thing about magcore was you could lose power and when it came back, you did not have to reboot - just start the processing.
Yeah, we were dealing with very large amounts of geo survey data of the sea floor so needed big removable storage so tapes ruled for a long time.
 

Parson

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I note that @Pyan's picture has been eliminated in some way, but it's still available in my quote.
 

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