Just finished Hero of Ages, should I read the rest of the Mistborn books?

The Imp

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This post will contain spoilers for the first three books in the Mistborn series. If you haven't read them, especially Hero Of Ages, you should stop reading now.

While I liked the first three books, I'm not sure if I like them enough to continue with the next 3 and then eventually the 7th and last book when it's published. Having everyone that I cared about not present in the next books is kind of a turn-off. I've also been told by my nephew that the fourth book at least is essentially Cowboys and allomancers. That doesn't sound particularly intriguing, although I must say that my favorite book in The Dark Tower series was Wizard and glass which was essentially a cowboy story in great part.

So my question is, would any of you recommend continuing the series? I want to read The Assassin's Apprentice, The Name of the Wind, and The Lies of Locke Lamora, all of which I already own. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

Ragandar

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Spoilered the whole shebang juuuust in case.

I suppose that depends on what you want out of those books. I personally thought Alloy of Law was fantastic, but Sanderson's magic systems and the witty interplay between characters are right up my alley. If you liked that about the original trilogy, you'll find it again in this one. Do you want to see the world of Mistborn develop, not just culturally, but technologically and magically? You'll find that there as well.

If you liked the original trilogy for its overarching struggle of good against evil, or the common folk working to overthrow a tyrant, then you'd probably be better served reading something else (although I've only read Alloy of Law of the follow-up books. It may change in future parts, no idea).

Cowboys and allomancers is a fair assessment, though it didn't bother me. And I'm not necessarily big on westerns.

I will also say that I thoroughly enjoyed Name of the Wind and Lies of Locke Lamora, though for different reasons. Hope that helps!
 

Anthoney

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I thought the second trilogy was wittier than the first. As for cowboys and allomancers (C&A), I'd say it was a little more complex than that. The man character is both an allomancer and a cowboy but most of the story that's place a big city. It's more like C&A who are in 1900 century London.
 

picklematrix

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The second era is different, but very good also. The pace is fast, and there us a lot of humour. Not as grand in scale as the first trilogy, but the characters are perhaps more endearing.
 

leoman1

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I loved the original trilogy. I really did not like the second. They are very different to each other. But if you like the Dark Tower series you are likely to get on well with the second trilogy.
 

Calleva

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I'm struggling with Alloy of Law and deeply disappointed. I devoured the Mistborn trilogy and expected this 'next' book to be as awesome. Sadly, it's not. In fact it's a massive lemon. The dialogue is not funny and I don't care for the Wild West setting which seems contrived. It is a struggle to get through it - and I read 600 pages of Well of Ascension in one day. Please tell me others feel the same way and that there are better Sanderson books out there. I really thought I'd found something special in Brandon S - is there anything else of his which can restore my previous very high opinion of his writing?
 

picklematrix

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I'm struggling with Alloy of Law and deeply disappointed. I devoured the Mistborn trilogy and expected this 'next' book to be as awesome. Sadly, it's not. In fact it's a massive lemon. The dialogue is not funny and I don't care for the Wild West setting which seems contrived. It is a struggle to get through it - and I read 600 pages of Well of Ascension in one day. Please tell me others feel the same way and that there are better Sanderson books out there. I really thought I'd found something special in Brandon S - is there anything else of his which can restore my previous very high opinion of his writing?
Although I enjoy the Alloy of Law more than you seem to have, I would not say it is his magnum opus.
If you like epic fantasy, the Storm light Archives may be to your liking. Big scale, large cast of characters, intricate world building are all implemented well, in my opinion. It's sort of his 'main' series in a way.
I also enjoy the standalone novels 'Elantris', and 'Warbreaker'. Both solid fantasies which should be quite quick, exciting reads.
Sanders on has written a lot of books, trying different things, so most people will like a few of his.
 

Augustine Stuart

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Despite what some of the others are saying, I think there's a strong case for Alloy of Law being one of Sanderson's stronger books. Yes, it's a little lighter than some of the others, but the entire series has incredible plot twists, super strong characters, and lots of laughs. You've got to read it-- and I don't say that lightly.
 

Bagpuss

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I think, if you're wanting to read the other Mistborn books then you should be aware that, although all the characters are great, the books create a series of questions about the Mistborn world that they never actually answer.

In many respects the Alloy of Law books do a good job of turning an apocalyptic-fantasy world into a wild-west world. What they don't do a very good job of is creating a convincing and satisfying plot. Whilst the main characters are great, the books create a shadowy organisation that remains shadowy and unresolved for three books. Basically, it's just an infinite deferral scenario. Of the type that Dr Who does. And I really hate infinite deferral scenarios.

Ultimately, I walked away from the books thinking that a number of very good characters, who I really liked, had effectively been wasted by an idiot who doesn't know how to plot. And that was quite disappointing.
 

Boaz

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@The Imp It's been over two years since your post, but here's my opinion... go with The Name of the Wind.

Forget the fact that Patrick Rothfuss, the author, has two books out in the trilogy and it's been nine years since the second book... forget that I feel he jumped the shark in the second book... The Name of the Wind is great. I know I rant against teenage heroes, but Rothfuss tells the story of Kvothe in a retired hero's memoir. Kvothe's a legend of magic, swordsmanship, manufacturing, music, politics, and romance. But he's emotionally spent, psychologically worn down, and physically tired. Above all he's jaded as to the worth of a hero, the good a man can do, and the necessity to take a stand. He's quit on society, relationships, and life. He's only in his late twenties.

As for Mistborn, the magic system is outstanding. Sanderson got me to read it just for that... but I never connected with any of the characters.
 

BAYLOR

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@The Imp It's been over two years since your post, but here's my opinion... go with The Name of the Wind.

Forget the fact that Patrick Rothfuss, the author, has two books out in the trilogy and it's been nine years since the second book... forget that I feel he jumped the shark in the second book... The Name of the Wind is great. I know I rant against teenage heroes, but Rothfuss tells the story of Kvothe in a retired hero's memoir. Kvothe's a legend of magic, swordsmanship, manufacturing, music, politics, and romance. But he's emotionally spent, psychologically worn down, and physically tired. Above all he's jaded as to the worth of a hero, the good a man can do, and the necessity to take a stand. He's quit on society, relationships, and life. He's only in his late twenties.

As for Mistborn, the magic system is outstanding. Sanderson got me to read it just for that... but I never connected with any of the characters.
Ive tried twice to get into Rothfus, I just cannot get into him.:confused:
 
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