Writers That You Started Out liking and you End Up Hating.

  1. BAYLOR

    BAYLOR There Are Always new Things to Learn.

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    Which writers and why ?
     
  2. Droflet

    Droflet I don't teach chickens how to dance.

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    David Weber. Starts out good then becomes goes over the same tired material. Blah, blah, blah, space battle, out. Started back with Mutineer's Moon. First book in the trilogy, great, second okay, third, see above.
     
  3. Vince W

    Vince W Well-Known Member

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    Agree on the Weber front. I really enjoyed HH in the beginning, but by the end of the series it get very Tom Clancy with all the weapon descriptions and such. Then there's Tom Clancy...:rolleyes:
     
  4. Spade

    Spade Custom User Title

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    Patricia Cornwell. Her mysteries just started being copy and paste situations with annoying characters.

    Ben Bova. Just politics after politics after annoying characters and more copy and paste situations on planets. He hasn't written anything worth glancing at since Jupiter, which I read as a teen - so even that might not be good.
     
  5. Parson

    Parson This world is not my home

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    Frank Hebert ..... Dune an absolute wonder and from there the books rapidly degenerate. I'm not sure I really enjoyed one after Dune Messiah.
     
  6. Toby Frost

    Toby Frost Well-Known Member

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    To be honest, I thought that God Emperor of Dune was a noticeable step down. I think Herbert made the mistake of destroying the interesting power structure of the empire and replacing most of the better characters with drab fanatical Fremen. It's hard to write a good sequel in a gutted setting.

    To be honest, I felt that Asimov went downhill when he started writing the last few Foundation books. The cold 1950s style of the earlier books left a lot to be desired, in my opinion, but some of the later stuff was bloated and weak. And the less said about some of Arthur C Clarke's collaborations with Gentry Lee, the better.
     
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  7. biodroid

    biodroid Expensive Gadget User

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    Raymond E Feist - The Riftwar trilogy, they seem to be only about Jimmy the Hand, I just couldn't be bothered by reading the rest of them.

    Brent Weeks - The Night Angel trilogy, I got fed up with the main characters whining and moping that no one loves him and people urinating on bread and feeding it to prisoners. It was bleak.
     
  8. nixie

    nixie pixie druid Staff Member

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    David Eddings and Robin Hobb, to be fair and don't hate Hobb but after awhile I find her characters depressing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2017
  9. Toby Frost

    Toby Frost Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I should add that it's not a case of "hating" those writers, just regarding their later work as weak.
     
  10. Venusian Broon

    Venusian Broon Defending the SF genre with terminal intensity

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    Totally agree. I think part of the problem was that he got it in his mind to connect every single fiction he'd written into an 'Isaac Asimov universe'. So a rather than go into interesting ideas, he was writing 'bridging pieces' to connect everything up.
     
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  11. Luiglin

    Luiglin by day Stuart Orford by night Dark Lord's scribe

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    George RR Martin. I love long stories with many plot threads but later books in the Song of Fire and Ice had too many that just weren't needed and some that were excruciatingly dragged out. It was getting to be a chore to read them. I just wanted to scream ... 'Get to the bloody point'.
     
  12. Venusian Broon

    Venusian Broon Defending the SF genre with terminal intensity

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    His quality of writing is good, so I was able to get through all that has been published quickly...

    ...but, yes he meanders more than meandering Jack McMeander, the winner of this year's meandering competition.
     
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  13. Toby Frost

    Toby Frost Well-Known Member

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    This explains why I am very wary of Stephen King's Dark Tower books. The "single continuity" thing seemed to become quite fashionable a few years ago. It also explains why I'm highly suspicious when people like George Lucas bring out sequels years after the original stories and claim that they'd had everything planned that way from the start.
     
  14. Vladd67

    Vladd67 Stake Holder

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    You say that though, and even though he denied it for ages I can remember when Star Wars came out Lucas being quoted as saying that Star Wars was the start of middle of the story, it’s just that he liked those characters best.
     
  15. Parson

    Parson This world is not my home

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    I had heard and if I remember correctly it was supposed to be a quote from Lucas, that "Star Wars" (not ever "A New Hope") was filmed first because Lucas felt that it was the most salable story and went there first to get his foot solidly in the high end movie door.
     
  16. Susan Boulton

    Susan Boulton The storyteller

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  17. Talysia

    Talysia Lady of Autumn

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    I wouldn't say hated, but I struggled with Raymond E Feist's later books, to the point that I still haven't finished the series. I loved the first half of the saga, but I just couldn't get in to the second half. I felt at the time that each generation of new characters seemed like copy/pastes of their predecessors, maybe with a few twists.

    I haven't read them in a long time, though, so maybe my feelings will have changed.
     
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  18. Inari Writer

    Inari Writer Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't say I hate Terry Goodkind.

    But I loved the Sword of Truth series for a long time.

    Then I read the book where the series' main character 'breaks communism', (admittedly a weird religious version of communism), with good old fashioned hard work and gumption.

    And the other book where the main character ultimately decides to return the kingdom of pacifists to their magically enforced isolation. Because pacifism is 'too dangerous' to be allowed to spread.

    So yeah; I don't think that Mr Goodkind and I have quite the same view of the world.

    Great imagination though. And I still hold to his statement that people believe things because they want to believe them or because they're afraid that they're true.
     
  19. Vince W

    Vince W Well-Known Member

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    I struggled through Goodkind's Sword of Truth. Then promptly dropped it into the nearest bin I could find. Best place for it really.
     
  20. Venusian Broon

    Venusian Broon Defending the SF genre with terminal intensity

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    I wouldn't go as far as hate, but certainly there are some big authors that I read loads, then it all got 'meh' as everything seemed to become samey and well-trodden.

    So an authors like Stephen King, I read voraciously as a 11-14 year old, (King is YA right? Well, it was YA for me in the 1980's), but got tired of him after a good 8-10 of his bricks. But still got a soft spot for him, I suppose.

    And Terry Pratchett. I think I've read the first 12 discworld, then I just drifted away. Needed something new to fuel the creativity.

    Turning to SF, I think Iain M. Banks is great...but all his SF is essentially 'Culture', even the non-culture SF has the same feel, except perhaps for Feersum Enjinn. So I kinda lost interest after Excession. I've returned and filled in the blanks more-or-less and although I enjoyed them (well, one left) they just don't have the same impact on me like the first three Culture books.
     
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