Why are people so obsessed with WW2?

psikeyhackr

Physics is Phutile, Fiziks is Fundamental
Joined
Jul 17, 2013
Messages
1,179
The Commies--not the ordinary Ivans who died by the millions in the war, but the ones running the country--were always bad guys.
I am a cynic. There are no Good Guys.

Isn't it interesting that the Commies, Cappies and Socies cannot think of something as simple as making 700 year old double-entry accounting mandatory in the schools? And then the Cappies kill a million Vietnamese to defend economists who can't do algebra? What happened to the Depreciation of all of the automobiles purchased by American consumers for the last half-a-century?
Economic Wargames
 

Lafayette

Man of Artistic Fingers
Joined
Jun 14, 2016
Messages
289
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
Yeah, and yet for some reason we still argue about whether or not it was actually about slavery. :rolleyes:
I think that question depends on where you were coming from. If you were a southerner it was about states rights. If you were an abolitionist it was about slavery. If you were black it was about freedom.

In my opinion, it started out as states rights versus federal sovereignty and ended up about slavery.
 

Lafayette

Man of Artistic Fingers
Joined
Jun 14, 2016
Messages
289
Location
Phoenix, Arizona
From a personal view, I had an uncle who served both on HMS Nelson and then later HMS Belfast (now a museum ship). But I think it was another of my uncles that really brought home how the war affected people. My uncle Frank was an alcoholic and I remember when I was a youngster, I would see him drunkenly staggering about the town in broad daylight whilst other townsfolk screwed up their noses and went about their business. To me, he was a family embarrassment and I did my best to avoid him. The strangest thing was that he was always dressed really smartly. I remember he was always clean-shaven, in slacks and navy blue blazer.

I never understood him until my dad sat me down and explained that Frank had been in the Merchant Navy. Twice, the ships he served on had been torpedoed and twice, he survived by clinging on to wreckage in the Atlantic until rescued. Drink, for him, was the only way he could blot out the memories of all his lost friends.

I understood a lot better after that, got to know him more and found that he was actually a really nice guy. Sadly, he died not long after finally defeating his alcoholism. That's what the war did to a member of my family and there will be millions of families all over the world who still, as Brian says, have a living memory of the impact of this conflict. Frank and Pat (my uncle on the Belfast) are why I have an interest in that period (my dad was too young, although he did try and sneak into the RAF).
In a strange and in an indirect way I and the rest of my family were affected. My oldest brother told me that our father also had two ships shot out from under him. I believe it caused or was one of the factors that caused his alcoholism. The result was he couldn't hold a job and take care of his large family (I'm number ten of sixteen) and so most of us (including me) were adopted out.

I and two of my brother were probably luckier than the rest for we were adopted by a very good and loving woman that was friends with my birth mother.
 

BAYLOR

There Are Always new Things to Learn.
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
13,321
The Commies--not the ordinary Ivans who died by the millions in the war, but the ones running the country--were always bad guys. They just got a brief propaganda victory in the West while they were on 'our' side.

Stalin was never really on anyone's side but his own. One of the most (darkly) amusing things I've read about WW2 was that the other Russian leaders asked Stalin for a meeting after the Nazis invaded, and he thought it was because they planned to kill him, and was quite shocked when they didn't. Because that was exactly what he would have done in their position.
Purging his generals in 1937, signing the nonaggression pact with Nazi Germany, refusing to believe the warnings from his intelligence and spy network of an impending attack by the Gemans. These are are good examples of Stalin's awesome stupidity and incompetence. He bears a great deal of the blame for the millions in Russia who died as a result of his decisions and actions.
 
Last edited:

Foxbat

None The Wiser
Supporter
Joined
Jul 24, 2003
Messages
6,709
Location
Scotland
Stalin was a monster but also an utterly fascinating character. Before ruling the USSR, he spent time as a meteorologist and as a bank robber. He was also a published poet.
 

Similar threads

Top