Lessons In Writing from Philip Pullman

Mouse

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Number three is very interesting. I mention rhythm sometimes when I'm betaing others. My editor's tried to remove a lot of my 'saids' from my novel and I've commented that a lot of the time they're there for the rhythm or flow. I also listen to random sounds on YouTube, rather than music.
 

Stephen Palmer

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My thoughts exactly Mouse. I was going to link to the article, but you beat me to it!
I also loved his comments on tone/structure. I kind of agree with him, but, like him, I do have a basic structure in place.
The whole "discovering characters" thing was also much like my experience . Interesting that he commented "doubt is good"
Overall, an excellent article.
 
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Great article. And, that music part is indeed interesting.
I know it's very important, and sometimes I won't listen to music at all when I'm working, but others I will want to listen to the sort of music that might fit the scene (kind of as though it were the soundtrack for the scene I am working on).

Also, that pen will be worth a lot one day! : )
 

Shorewalker

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Something that I've discovered for myself recently is what you discover when you read your work out loud. I've started attending a writing circle and most weeks, we have a manuscript read. The number of errors you find is unreal (and slightly worrying!), but you also get a very good sense of pace, tone and impact.

I've now started doing it at home and would recommend people to give it a go. It won't work for everybody, but I have found it invaluable.
 

AlexH

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I like using rhythm in my writing, but I have no problem having music playing when I'm writing - I've never thought it consciously affects the rhythm of my writing.

It's good Pullman still writes for himself, first and foremost.

Something that I've discovered for myself recently is what you discover when you read your work out loud. I've started attending a writing circle and most weeks, we have a manuscript read. The number of errors you find is unreal (and slightly worrying!), but you also get a very good sense of pace, tone and impact.

I've now started doing it at home and would recommend people to give it a go. It won't work for everybody, but I have found it invaluable.
I could be wrong, but I'd go as far as saying it would help for almost anyone. I felt weird when I first started doing it, but I read every word aloud now.
 

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