Diskdrive World - Terry Pratchett's Unfinished...

Biskit

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What a miserable old b******.

I've never read any Terry Pratchett (!) so I'm just going from my own opinions, but ... ugh. Horrible man.

pH

I don't see how its horrible; most authors only publish a tiny amount of what they produce in concepts and potential writing. It wasn't finished books that were destroyed but likely ideas, concepts, bits and dead ends as well as buts cut from other stories. Whilst there is some interest in such material its also the kind of stuff that really tends to be rather pointless. Unless someone goes through and adds a lot of the missing parts to make them into readable stories - and chances are that he just didn't want anyone else writing his story for him.
 

Phyrebrat

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It's horrible because it's such a mean-spirited way to go about it.

Surely some kind of injunction could be made à la Stanley Kubrick. And if not, then a direction in his LW&T that the hard drives be wiped without all the spiteful dramatics.

pH
 

Biskit

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I'm sad there is no more, but glad because anything now would be a sad, pale immitation of a world, and author, I love.
There seems to be no shortage out there of 'franchises' being taken on/sold on, even with the original author still alive. That said, I find it impossible to believe that you could find anyone with that same blend of wit, charm, broad knowledge and sharp view on life that would qualify them them to go anywhere near trying to 'finish' Terry Pratchett's 'unfinished'.

Terry Pratchett is gone, and I was so looking forwards to more, but at least no-one gets to tinker with the legacy. Authors die - enjoy what they wrote without chasing what they might have written.
 

The Big Peat

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It's horrible because it's such a mean-spirited way to go about it.

Surely some kind of injunction could be made à la Stanley Kubrick. And if not, then a direction in his LW&T that the hard drives be wiped without all the spiteful dramatics.

pH

I don't see anything spiteful or mean spirited about it and neither, it seems, do most of his fans. Its a bit of light hearted showmanship entirely in keeping with his humour and his stated intent that the only thing he'd leave behind were his finished works. And I, along with most of his other fans, can't think of many authors I'd describe as less horrible than Pratchett.

Besides, physical destruction of the hard drive is considered the only safe way of ensuring that sensitive data cannot be recovered in a lot of walks of life. It's what happens (or should) to all NHS hard drives that have contained patient data. An intact drive can still be stolen and data recovery will usually find it even if wiped. The only thing you can't steal data from is a destroyed drive.
 

Wruter

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Quite a contrast to Stephen King, whose unfinished works are already in library collections and have their own wikipedia page.

As a fan I would have liked to see a retrospective collection of the best unpublished bits, similar to Douglas Adams with The Salmon of Doubt, but Pratchett's own stated wishes for the material should be upheld above all.
 

The Big Peat

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I'm not arguing his logic, just the pettiness.

pH

And I am beyond mystified as to how you see pettiness in his actions.

edit: I feel like you're seeing this as some big "Eff you" or "Nyaaaah you can't have this". And I really don't see that.

Leaving aside the issue that we've no idea what actual instructions were left in the will and to what extent public destruction is Pratchett's idea and to what extent its others' idea, I see it as "Well, its going to be done, so what's the most fun way of doing it?"

Unless you think the pettiness lies in a storyteller ensuring his stories won't be altered/finished by others after his death, in which case I can only vehemently disagree.
 
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