10 Common Mistakes that native English speakers make

Brian G Turner

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Some are obvious and we've seen before - some might not be. :)


It's good to hear him make the point he makes at the end that some of these may not represent mistakes, but instead changes to English that are not yet accepted as standard.
 

Danny McG

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When he got to 'literally' I just keep loading on TBBT.
Sheldon being sarky to Penny's old boyfriends
 

Phyrebrat

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It's funny because I know the grammatical rules of, say French, far more comprehensively (ha hah) than my own language, but I feel I have an automatic, or intuitive grasp of the rules we follow.

I don't ever hear British Engish speakers say 'went' as in 'we should've went to the party', but it is something I hear in American English a lot.

And +1 to what Robert said re fewer and lesser. I learnt that from Stephen Fry and Tesco :D

pH
 

dask

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I don't ever hear British Engish speakers say 'went' as in 'we should've went to the party', but it is something I hear in American English a lot.pH
I use them both pretty much equally. Don't know why I pick one over the other at any given time, whatever feels right.
 

Alex The G and T

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Separated by a common language... quite.

And people speak for effect. Often an idiomatic turn-of-phrase carries a significant emotive nuance; tailored to the audience and the nature of the topic.
 
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farntfar

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I would certainly put more stress on the TISS than the PAR.Certainly more than the woman does on the Oxford Dictionaries.
Much as you suggested originally TDZ.

PAR-tiss-i-pul make it sound terribly dull.
 

Danny McG

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There was an online discussion, I think when the first film with Jack Sparrow came out, on how to pronounce 'Caribbean', IIRC it was quickly determined that USA and UK put the stress on different syllables :)
 

farntfar

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As a Cumbrian, then, Danny, do you say PAR-tiss-i-ple?
In Essex, we say par-TISS-i-ple. (unless they've changes since I moved to France.)
In France we say par-tiss-I-p
 

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