Douglas Hulick: No Tales of the Kin 3 coming

thaddeus6th

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Very sad to hear.

Edited extra bit: but at least he's getting counselling and hopefully will be able to make a full recovery.
 

Heather Myst

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This was very sad. I'm a fan of his books and I hope he finds happiness in his life soon.
 

ratsy

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I had talked to him a few months ago, and he told me about this. I was really sorry to hear it. I for one, loved his first two Kin books. Hopefully he can find a place where he feels better, and can eventually get back to it. Or at the least be happy and accepting of it all. Wishing him the best.
 

Paul_C

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He has my sympathy, as this sounds like what I went through a few years ago.

I'm not a writer, but I used to make electric guitars and sold a few over the years I was doing it, but reached a point where I took on a job for someone which ended up taking 7 years to complete. I never actually completed it, I came to an arrangement with the customer where I provided him with what I'd managed to do plus a few other bits and pieces and a friend of his finished it off (by this point it mostly needed spraying with lacquer and putting together).

What had happened to me was that I began to get anxious that what I was making might not be good enough for the money I was asking, and this built up to the point where I found it almost impossible to work on the guitar and would do anything other than what I knew I ought to be doing. I also repaired guitars (still do) and would clear all the repairs out of the way ready to get on with it, then find other things to do until more repairs came in.

Because this put me behind schedule I then felt that the extra time the customer was having to wait meant there was even more pressure to get it perfect, and so it got worse and worse. It reached the point where I tried CBT and then drugs in an attempt to get myself into a state where I could finish it but even that failed to help.

I've still got two outstanding jobs here, both for friends - one of which is a 50th birthday gift (he'll be 53 this year).

Even writing this out has raised my anxiety level, despite currently being dosed with anti anxiety/depression drugs (for a different reason) which shows how much stress it caused me.
 

Paul_C

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There's also the difference between writing for yourself and writing to a deadline.

I don't know anything about him but Wiki suggests he's written two books so far (I have no idea if there are others unpublished), which might mean that the first he wrote with no pressure and the second he may have had an outline for before he'd finished the first.

So the first was easy as it was already mostly complete, the second started to put pressure on him as deadlines were passed but he managed to get it done eventually and by the time he started (or tried to start) the third the anxiety reached a level where he could no longer write for fear of not producing something worthy of the time and money invested in him.

Time passes with nothing happening and the weight becomes so great that the only sensible way out is to stop. It might be that he comes back to writing now there's no pressure and writes a third, but it's also possible that he never writes again.
 

Nick B

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This is a sad story, and I wish Doug the best of wishes. I hope he gets into writing some great new stuff that really makes him happy.
 

Toby Frost

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I feel sorry for him. Depression and anxiety do seem to be common among writers and similar creative types. I’ve run into quite a range of artists one way or another, and it does seem to lurk in the background for so many people. There but for the grace of God, etc. I don’t know Douglas Hulick’s work, but I hope that he writes again.

It must be extremely difficult to produce work when dealing with real, large-scale pressure (of course, it would depend a lot on the writer). I have been asked by about six people when I will be doing a new Space Captain Smith book (it’s in progress) and yes, I feel considerable pressure and worry that it’s not as good as the last one. And that’s comparatively nothing. Goodness knows how George Martin must feel. The prevalence of social media can’t help. I get the feeling that, before the internet, SF writers just fired off a book every so often to explore an idea as they wanted, and that was that. Now their progress can be followed closely, and people can demand that they get the same as before, except better and different, and then trash the book on Amazon.

Given that many people are attracted to very long and complex serials, especially in fantasy, I wonder – very vaguely – if we will eventually see more stories being finished by different people to those who started them, if the starting author dies or is too unwell to finish the story. But that's rather off-topic.
 

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