Rough draft is done, now what?

Twistedlemon

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This is a continuation of a status I posted. I feel as if more will benefit if it's read on here instead of my profile. At this point I have 53k of my first novel in its rough draft. I'll probably refer to this thread when it becomes successful.
 

Venusian Broon

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I'll just add to what Ratsy said - leaving it to one side for a while is a very good idea (of course depends on time pressures and a whole bunch of things.) but you do usually need to refresh yourself before tackling the story again.

The other thing I like to do is before doing a major re-write or early draft is to completely read the whole thing - otherwise you may end up putting stuff in, only to discover that you did in fact have this material but at another point in the manuscript.
 

Twistedlemon

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The other thing I like to do is before doing a major re-write or early draft is to completely read the whole thing - otherwise you may end up putting stuff in, only to discover that you did in fact have this material but at another point in the manuscript.

Would this be a point where some who are pansters (present party included) should create a plot map for character arcs and such?
 

Venusian Broon

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Would this be a point where some who are pansters (present party included) should create a plot map for character arcs and such?

I don't know. If it helps you I suppose!

The odd thing I suppose is that I, being an arch-plotter, tend to leave the scaffolding of my initial 'maps' and world-building (the scene-by-scene descriptions, character descriptions, essays on the world etc...) largely alone by the time I'm passed the first draft. The manuscript has now become canon and because it's etched into my brain I don't need all the bits I used to create it. :)
 

Jo Zebedee

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Depends what sort of pantster you are. ;) i'd probably whack through it again, get it reasonably honed and seek feedback (but my long sufffering writing group are tolerant of early drafts), and then work at something else for a wee while.
 

Twistedlemon

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So the important fact is to switch gears and start or continue another wip. For anyone who may read this later and is past the stage where they let their rough draft marinate with time; what is the best mindset for editing? Some have suggested a full read of the entire doc, would everyone agree on that?
 

Jo Zebedee

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So the important fact is to switch gears and start or continue another wip. For anyone who may read this later and is past the stage where they let their rough draft marinate with time; what is the best mindset for editing? Some have suggested a full read of the entire doc, would everyone agree on that?
For me that works - but it might not be for you. This is the time when you can play and work out what works. Enjoy! (I do a full read/write through)
 

ratsy

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I know for my shorter stuff I like to read over it all a couple days after writing, then I go to revisions. I can't claim to say I would use the same process on a novel because I'm yet to complete one but I think it would be a good idea. As VB said, reading it all allows you to catch any inconsistencies you may have with time, names, characters, events etc
 

Teresa Edgerton

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In your place I would turn right around and start the second draft while there is momentum. At 53,000 words I doubt this is something you've been obsessing over every day for a long period of time, so I don't think you need to take a break.

On the other hand, if there is a different story in your head absolutely clamoring to be told, then work on that one instead while your enthusiasm for it is high.
 

Twistedlemon

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In your place I would turn right around and start the second draft while there is momentum. At 53,000 words I doubt this is something you've been obsessing over every day for a long period of time, so I don't think you need to take a break.

On the other hand, if there is a different story in your head absolutely clamoring to be told, then work on that one instead while your enthusiasm for it is high.

It's like you know me, I have one I've delayed writing until I got this one done.
 

TheDustyZebra

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The other thing I like to do is before doing a major re-write or early draft is to completely read the whole thing - otherwise you may end up putting stuff in, only to discover that you did in fact have this material but at another point in the manuscript.

I'll second this. I have been known to start editing something I've written, thinking it needed something added, only to discover it was already there in another place, or thinking something didn't make sense, only to find it had meaning somewhere later on. Read it all first, make notes if you like, but don't cut or add until you've finished reading.
 

Twistedlemon

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@BrianTurner I am a panster by trade so I am sure that number will increase a lot more as I add depth and description to the plot. I have seen a lot shorter ones get self published if I need to come back an add another scene I will.

@TheDustyZebra I am sure this will happen to me again. As I was writing this draft I filled a plot hole twice with dialogue. I'm not sure if it is a good or bad problem to have, a self conscious cleaning up of the writing before the major editing.
 

AnyaKimlin

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Twistedlemon

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Mayhem was only 49,000 for it's rough first draft. Now I am struggling to keep it under 100K having pruned it of several subplots and lost about 40 characters along the way.

If I double my word count in the editing phase more power to me I guess. But I feel more confident on it's pre hardcore edit length now. Thanks!
 

Droflet

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Okay Twisty, what they all said. Second drafts are where you flesh out the story, make it more, hmm, well just more. Yeah, rewrites, my favorite part of writing. Nooooooooooot. But a great way to acquire writing skills.
Now to the big issue. So, I'm in a different hemisphere, and probably older than some on this site, but what the hell is pantser???? No really, I have only a vague idea from the context but I've never heard of this expression.
 

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