Has Hollywood become too Dependent On Blockbuster films?

BAYLOR

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That's the point. They make many times what they cost to make, but standard accounting practices make it a loss on paper so they don't have to pay taxes or royalties to anyone owed them.

The biggest way they do this is setting up subsidiaries in other countries and then having those companies charge the company (the one set up specifically for that movie/franchise) massive amounts of money to market and distribute the film. They are essentially paying themselves (as they own the marketing/distribution companies as well) so that on paper it looks like the film made a loss.

The actual cost of marketing and distribution is much lower than they charge themselves to do it, but the more they pay for those services, the more money they can move into other tax jurisdictions.
That practice needs to be ended.
 

BAYLOR

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If the movie theater shut down continues into next year , I wonder what Hollywood will do in response ?
 

JohnM

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Hollywood will put new material on so-called 'streaming services.'

And I'd like to see some documented proof about how Hollywood loses money on films that make money. Sure, there could be problems later but that's what attorneys are for. Or how money made somewhere else is moved elsewhere to avoid certain taxes.

If I was Hollywood, or any book publisher, I would want one blockbuster after another.
 

BAYLOR

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Hollywood will put new material on so-called 'streaming services.'

And I'd like to see some documented proof about how Hollywood loses money on films that make money. Sure, there could be problems later but that's what attorneys are for. Or how money made somewhere else is moved elsewhere to avoid certain taxes.

If I was Hollywood, or any book publisher, I would want one blockbuster after another.
If so, It might best to insist on being paid upfront for your book rather then via net profit.
 

Overread

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I suspect cinemas might be like food outlets. We will see many close and major chains contract over the year. Some of those will be in areas where contraction/closure was going to happen in the next 5-10 years anyway (eg rural pubs); however some will happen in busy areas too. After Corona is removed as a major issue and we can go back to normal social life I would expect to see rebound. Food outlets I'd expect to rebound rather quickly, though if work-from-home takes off in a big way we might see some areas have less individual outlets.
Cinemas might well recover as well. Heck the post-corona-celebration lifestyle that might arise might even result in a boom for those that are still open.

Hollywood and the like might well not have to do anything ,though they might now split their movies between streaming and cinema display. Certainly the "direct to stream" period of time after a cinema buys the films to show will likely be even shorter.
What's also interesting is that the whole direct to stream issue has put some bad blood between major cinema groups and Hollywood producers so there's some bad feelings there that might well persist.

Thing is if the Hollywood machine feels it doesn't need cinemas to make a fortune they might well not really care what happens; or on the other hand they might decide its important to maintain (that way they don't have to compete with TV series and the like also on streaming services and groups like Amazon who are fast heading to their own film franchises and such). So they might decide to invest into the preservation of cinemas in high population areas.

I urge everyone to have their contracts reviewed by an attorney before signing.
And to make sure its an attorney practising and experienced in that specific field of work. Many a person has "their lawyer" look at something, but if the lawyer is used to one type of work, then they aren't going to know the tricks, pitfalls or issues that might arise from a contract about an area so far outside of their field of work. Good lawyers will point that out and even refuse because they can't give reliable/valid/accurate advice.
 

KGeo777

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I knew someone (a lawyer) who had a friend who came up with a reality show concept and told the idea to someone who then took the idea to a big movie person, and his company made the show. The one who came up with the idea wanted to take it to court but the law firms contacted said they couldn't touch it because if they did they would be ostracized due to the influence of this big movie person. So that was a case where the law didn't matter. Hollywood can be quite thuggish.
James Garner sued Universal over royalties due to him for the Rockford Files since he took a pay cut to make the show.
When the show ended--one week later he was at a traffic stop and had a car accident and an ex-Green Beret beat him up so badly he was in hospital for a week. He still sued and won.
The guy who successfully sued over the Poltergeist script did not get a career advantage from it.
 

Timebender

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My thought is that maybe, as the technology used to make movies becomes more widely available and more accessible to the layman, if what we're seeing is an increase in competition for Hollywood like never before, and as such they're less willing to take risks and invest in anything except the big crowdpleasers.
 

JohnM

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I suspect Hollywood will be seeing less competition from the layman. A friend in Hollywood, and some research, shows it is very difficult and very time consuming. At least to put together something that is up to the standards most people are used to. The complaint for many years is that Hollywood doesn't take risks. Yet there is a category of films outside of the mainstream that do get made.

In book publishing meant for general audiences, it is possible to put out interesting material that was also enjoyable for the writer to produce. A conversation I had with a videogame producer boiled down to: "Yes, we can make unusual or niche games, but why should we?" These electronic games can make as much or more than a Hollywood film, but that market is glutted.
 

KGeo777

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News media has been bypassed by many small operators.
In theory the same should be true of other culture media.

Things like Deep Fakes--I bet at some point someone will try
making a new 1960s Star Trek episode using the technology.
Could be grotesque in results but I think such things will be done outside of
the corporate influence.
 

CupofJoe

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Has anyone else read this?
The gist seems to be that if a studio want a guarantee of a $500m - 1b run for it's big films, it is going to have to do something...
 

CupofJoe

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News media has been bypassed by many small operators.
In theory the same should be true of other culture media.

Things like Deep Fakes--I bet at some point someone will try
making a new 1960s Star Trek episode using the technology.
Could be grotesque in results but I think such things will be done outside of
the corporate influence.
But imagine what a "new" Marilyn Monroe, James Dean or River Phoenix film might be like?
If it is done well....
We are already well on the way to it with the de-aging of actors or recreating them ala Carrie Fisher [in Rogue One?]
 

KGeo777

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I think it's part of Hollywood's insanity that they are focusing on China. If you have an Italian pizza business, you don't expect to make pizzas which cater to Chinese patrons AND Italian ones at the same time. It would make no sense. The pizzas would satisfy neither Italians nor Chinese. But that is how Hollywood looks at culture.
In 1960, the idea that you could make a film that caters to all audiences in the world would have been seen as bizarre.

As for the resurrection of actors--there's two problems with it. One is the amount of work, even if computer-assisted, to make a fake that would trick everybody is the Mt Everest of problems-especially if you want a performance. You could probably compromise by doing a performance of someone taken from a different angle (i.e. Humphrey Bogart in a scene from one of his movies, but the camera located somewhere other than the original position. Since in that case, you aren't necessarily making a performance from scratch but extrapolating from the available data).
The other problem and this was mentioned in reference to the Peter Cushing scenes in the Rogue One movie--yes, they made a Peter Cushing that sort of resembles him despite the voice being off. But what if instead they just hired someone like Charles Dance to do his own performance of Tarkin?

Is the fake Cushing superior as a dramatic character to a real Dance portrayal? I think that's the problem with this DeepFake thing. It's an interesting special effects technique but I suspect much of the time the use will come across as ill-fitting unless done as an experiment.

Beyond the moral questions of putting a famous actor in a new movie which they may well not have been wiling to do, like James Dean in some upcoming Vietnam movie.
I think it is depriving newer actors of resonating with audiences, but with Hollywood's other problems, probably way down in the list.
I have to wonder if the virus just gives Hollywood an excuse to shut down theaters.
It happened with live theater in 1900--the ownership of theaters became centralized and the first thing they did was shut down a huge number and increase prices.
 

KGeo777

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Re: the article. It is very interesting that China and Asia has apparently recovered fully from the virus originating there, and yet the West is expected to radically change, losing economic and cultural infrastructure.

"And without Hollywood movies, local films have had a bigger chance in cinemas," Wong adds, citing the success of Chinese drama My People, My Homeland and Japanese Anime movie Demon Slayer: Kimetsu No Yaiba.

Imagine that--if Hollywood didn't have monopoly control and stifle competition, more artists could reach audiences.
 
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BAYLOR

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Re: the article. It is very interesting that China and Asia has apparently recovered fully from the virus originating there, and yet the West is expected to radically change, losing economic and cultural infrastructure.

"And without Hollywood movies, local films have had a bigger chance in cinemas," Wong adds, citing the success of Chinese drama My People, My Homeland and Japanese Anime movie Demon Slayer: Kimetsu No Yaiba.

Imagine that--if Hollywood didn't have monopoly control and stifle competition, more artists could reach audiences.
The Chinese Science Fiction film The Wandering Earth did big Box office China .
 
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Rodders

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It may have done well, but i tried to watch it and turned it off after maybe half hour. It wasn’t a great film. Well made, though.

My problem with Hollywood is it’s over reliance on set pieces. Sometimes you can watch a movies and its just non-stop action.
 

CupofJoe

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It may have done well, but i tried to watch it and turned it off after maybe half hour. It wasn’t a great film. Well made, though.
My problem with Hollywood is it’s over reliance on set pieces. Sometimes you can watch a movies and its just non-stop action.
You maybe on to something. For the recent Marvel and DC films when I watch them on disc I have to stop and do something else every 30-45 minutes, even it is just make a cup of tea or make room for one. A film can't be at 11 all the time.
but I watched Le Mans '66 no problem.
 

BAYLOR

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I wonder how long the movie companies can keep pushing back the premiers of their films ?
 
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