Other Writers Doing Lovecraftian Mythos stories

BAYLOR

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#1
There are more then a few writer who delved into Lovecrafts universe of horror. Who are yor favorites ?
 
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#2
That's... quite an inquiry. Let's see:

T. E. D. Klein
W. H. Pugmire
Thomas Ligotti
Caitlin R. Kiernan
Ann K. Schwader
Ramsey Campbell
Gene Wolfe
Joe Pulver, Sr.
Laird Barron
Fritz Leiber
James Wade
Clark Ashton Smith
Colin Wilson
Fred Chappell
F. Paul Wilson
Gary Meyers
Will Murray
Brian Stableford...

That's just for openers.....

Here's a very limited list of anthologies of such writings:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cthulhu_Mythos_anthology#The_Disciples_of_Cthulhu
 

w h pugmire esq

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#3
Actually, it's Gary MYERS. He's a delightful fellow, and I was thrill'd to meet him at ye Lovecraft Film Festival and have him sign my copy of his Arkham House collection.

I have become entirely entranced with the Lovecraftian weird fiction of Brian Stableford, and am leaning toward a conclusion that he is indeed my favourite living Lovecraftian writer.

Another writer is Peter Rawlik, who has written a couple of fun Mythos novels.

For a fascinating study of contemporary Mythos, S. T. Joshi has revised, expanded, and updated his book-length study, and this new version, THE RISE, FALL, AND RISE OF THE CTHULHU MYTHOS, will be publish'd this summer by Hippocampus Press. I was able to go over the text of this new edition in pdf, and it is wonderful!
 
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#4
Sorry; the additional "e" was simply a typo overlooked due to exhaustion. And I've not encountered Rawlik before... I'll have to look him up,

Glad to hear about a new edition of Joshi's book; along with the massive Jarocha-Ernst Bibliography & Concordance, I'd suggest it as a great place to start....
 

Deep Space Nina

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#5
August Derleth is one. Though he has given a guy my surname. I can grant it is not a first name. But I loved to read what Derleth has written and he did a lot to make HPL popular.
 
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#8
I don't know if this list adds anything, but between it and the wikipedia thing I see innumerable authors in the Pile I need to explore. Already known authors listed (while possibly just for an atypical one-shot) include Kuttner, Moore, Leiber, Farmer, Zelazny, Ellison, Shirley and even Sterling and more. I have read just a touch of Bloch and even Ballard and look forward to more. Some others as well.

So of the list of eligible authors, it'd pretty clearly be Bruce Sterling for my very favorite but that's certainly atypical in both a Lovecraft and Sterling sense. My favorite "lovecraftian" author, for sheer variety including and beyond that and longevity and peak skills and so on would probably by Fritz Leiber.
 

Deep Space Nina

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#9
The Wikipedia-list is quite incomplete. I know that their plenty of anthologies in languages other than English. (Even I edited one in German language, O.K., never became famous, but there are certainly outstanding HPL-anthologies in different countries.)
 

JaimeRetief

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#12
There were several relatively recent C'thulhu anthologies , like the two volume Black Wings of Cthulhu edited by S. T. Joshi.Those had several pretty good stories by prominent authors that are actually still among the living.

Cthulhu's Reign
, also a recent short stury collection, however the average quality was inferior in comparison to Black Wings.

New Cthulhu had a few decent stories and I enjoyed far more than I did Cthulhu's Reign.

I would recommend that you stay away from the Cthulhu Unbound and Future Lovecraft collections, they were all quite bad.

Historical Lovecraft is somewhere in-between, the stories were better than those in the last two anthologies I mentioned, but overall I was not very satisfied.

There is also something called Cthulhurotica, I have no idea if it is good or not, or how much smut and bad tentacle romance might be involved.

Stross and Gaiman are probably the two most prominent currently active writers that have written in the Mythos universe.
Stross' writing is somewhat dryish and not all that original, but if you wish to see a combination of spy thriller and Lovecraftean horror with a snarky sysadmin as a narrator he is your man.
Gaiman's C'thulhu/Holmes crossover was not all that good if you ask me, I hope he stays as far away from Lovecraft as possible.
 

BAYLOR

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#13
August Derleth is one. Though he has given a guy my surname. I can grant it is not a first name. But I loved to read what Derleth has written and he did a lot to make HPL popular.
August Derleth is very good writer ,his lovecraftain stuff, well worth reading. The Trail of Cthulhu excellent stuff as is Lurker at the Threshold which completed from Story fragment by H P Lovecraft. (y)
 

Ningauble

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#14
August Derleth is very good writer ,his lovecraftain stuff, well worth reading. The Trail of Cthulhu excellent stuff as is Lurker at the Threshold which completed from Story fragment by H P Lovecraft. (y)
Actually, Derleth didn't "complete" it since there was nothing to complete. The plot is all Derleth's. The text is all Derleth's also, except for the quotation from the Necronomicon (slightly altered) from "The Dunwich Horror" and the quotation from Of Evill Sorceries Done in New-England of Daemons in No Humane Shape -- Derleth's contribution is more than 96% of the text. In addition to these two genuine pieces of Lovecraft text, Derleth used Lovecraft's description of a mysterious tower and a strange window. That's it. Lovecraft's texts can be seen here: http://crypt-of-cthulhu.com/fragmentsthreshold.htm

As for its quality... well... In the third section Derleth regurgitates 48 Mythos names in the space of three pages, like a fanboy munchkin playing Call of Cthulhu. Not his proudest moment.
 
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#15
Actually, Derleth didn't "complete" it since there was nothing to complete. The plot is all Derleth's. The text is all Derleth's also, except for the quotation from the Necronomicon (slightly altered) from "The Dunwich Horror" and the quotation from Of Evill Sorceries Done in New-England of Daemons in No Humane Shape -- Derleth's contribution is more than 96% of the text. In addition to these two genuine pieces of Lovecraft text, Derleth used Lovecraft's description of a mysterious tower and a strange window. That's it. Lovecraft's texts can be seen here: http://crypt-of-cthulhu.com/fragmentsthreshold.htm

As for its quality... well... In the third section Derleth regurgitates 48 Mythos names in the space of three pages, like a fanboy munchkin playing Call of Cthulhu. Not his proudest moment.
Not only that, but he completely changes direction in that final section, basically throwing out everything he had introduced before, at least as far as the actual supernatural element is concerned.

I still find some very appealing things about the book, but overall, my view on this one has become very... jaded.

Oh, and it is now three, not two, volumes of Black Wings....
 

Ningauble

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#16
Oh, and it is now three, not two, volumes of Black Wings....
Four -- the fourth volume was released by PS Publishing recently. The fifth has already been completed, but I don't know when it will be published. The sixth volume has been greenlighted, but Joshi has not started working on it yet.
 
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#17
Four -- the fourth volume was released by PS Publishing recently. The fifth has already been completed, but I don't know when it will be published. The sixth volume has been greenlighted, but Joshi has not started working on it yet.
Ah, thanks for the update. Even more to catch up with, then....
 

w h pugmire esq

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#18
I've had this obsession with owning the AH edition of THE TRAIL OF CTHULHU--so I finally found a copy for $70 and went ahead and got it. I wanted to have the original edition because I love that dust jacket. I am now trying to reread the book--and it's difficult, because I find it rather awful.

BLACK WINGS V has been completed edited, and after a wee break S. T. will begin to solicit stories for BLACK WINGS VI. NEW CTHULHU 2 was publish'd some months ago and is quite good. Darrell Schweitzer's THAT IS NOT DEAD is a slim anthology of new Mythos fiction publish'd by PS Publishing and it has some very good stories; and PS will soon release INNSMOUTH NIGHTMARES, edited by Lois Gresh--I've just read many of ye tales in pdf and the book is magnificent!

I have a new book, written in collaboration with David Barker, just publish'd this month by Dark Renaissance Books, and it is intensely Lovecraftian; and sometime this summer, Hippocampus Press will bring forth my newest book, MONSTROUS AFTERMATH, which is completely Lovecraftian and will include, as appendix, HPL's entire Fungi from Yuggoth.
 

BAYLOR

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#19
Actually, Derleth didn't "complete" it since there was nothing to complete. The plot is all Derleth's. The text is all Derleth's also, except for the quotation from the Necronomicon (slightly altered) from "The Dunwich Horror" and the quotation from Of Evill Sorceries Done in New-England of Daemons in No Humane Shape -- Derleth's contribution is more than 96% of the text. In addition to these two genuine pieces of Lovecraft text, Derleth used Lovecraft's description of a mysterious tower and a strange window. That's it. Lovecraft's texts can be seen here: http://crypt-of-cthulhu.com/fragmentsthreshold.htm

As for its quality... well... In the third section Derleth regurgitates 48 Mythos names in the space of three pages, like a fanboy munchkin playing Call of Cthulhu. Not his proudest moment.
I read it some years back and thought it was quite good .(y)
 
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#20

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