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Winners of Ditmar Awards announced

Discussion in 'General Book Discussion' started by SFF Chronicles News, Oct 20, 2013.

    SFF Chronicles News

    SFF Chronicles News Well-Known Member

    Oct 20, 2013
    10th September 2010 05:23 AM

    Elaine Frei


    The winners of the Ditmar Awards for Australian science fiction were announced Friday, 3 September 2010 at NatCon-Dudcon III, the Australian National Science Fiction Convention, at Melbourne, as part of Aussiecon, the 68th Worldcon.

    To be eligible for the Awards, nominees had to have been either Australian citizens or permanent residents of Australia in the year the nominated work was released.

    Slights (Angry Robot), by Kaaron Warren, was named Best Novel, while the Best Novella or Novelette was “Wives” (X6), by Paul Haines and “Seventeen” (Masques), by Cat Sparks, was named Best Short Story.

    Paul Haines also received the prize for Best Collected work, for his Slice of Life (The Mayne Press).

    The Best Artwork price went to Lewis Morley for his cover art for Andromeda Spaceways Inflight Magazine #42, while Peter M. Ball was named Best New Talent.

    The Best Fan Writer was Robert Hood for Undead Backbrain (Roberthood.net/blog), while the Best Fan Artist was Dick Jenssen, who won for his body of work. The Best Fan Publication in Any Medium was Steam Engine Time, edited by Bruce Gillespie and Janine Stinson.

    The prize for Best Achievement went to Gillian Polack and others for the Southern Gothic banquet at Conflux

    Finally, the William Atheling Jr. Award for Criticism or Review was given to Helen Merrick for The Secret Feminist Cabal: A Cultural History of Science Fiction Feminisms (Aqueduct).

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