Famous enough? and referencing ebooks

AnyaKimlin

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I include the following line in my story and want to know firstly if the address is iconic enough do I need to include a second sentence about the character or would the footnote be enough? Also I have never referenced an ebook before is the referencing OK?(I'm opting for footnotes so it is not in the text).

The lines:
…We met the next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B Baker Street of which he had spoken at our meeting…1

The reference:
1. Arthur Conan Doyle, The Complete Sherlock Holmes Collection [Kindle Edition], Study in Scarlet, Chapter Two.
 
Iconic enough for me.

Nice link, Springs. I wish I'd known it when I was doing my French dissertation!
 
It asks for a page number? ebooks don't have them. Because it is going in a fiction book I'd like to use the Latin system if I can as it is less obtrusive.

Figured as long as it was correct it wouldn't be rejected for it. But have never referenced an ebook before.
 
Anya, I read your first line. As soon as I saw reference to an iconic address, my mind immediately shouted out: 221b Baker Street! Sherlock Holmes is instantly recognisable. At least to me.

Harvard referencing is always good. My only question is why do you need to reference a book that way in a story? Unless it's in the form of a mock journal, like the Flashman novels, it's normally the sort of thing that's reserved for non-fiction.
 
I'm assuming I do as I've used the line ? I thought it was a better way to reveal the book than giving the title to the book he is reading. (I'm happy to be corrected). This is the context. In the text it is indented. I could have it all wrong lol.

My eyes dart to the door to check the key is in the locked position as I really don’t want to be caught reading the banned text from the old world. I turn to the second chapter:

We met the next day as he had arranged, and inspected the rooms at No. 221B Baker Street of which he had spoken at our meeting…1
 
From examples that I've seen, you normally get permission to use it (or the publishers do), and you put a mention in the frontispiece, one of the pages just before the story.

The line on page X comes from Study in Scarlet, by Arthur Conan Doyle, with kind permission from his estate.

Or something like that. I'm not sure, but with the age, it may be out of copyright across the world. Double check that, of course, but if so, then you simply put the accreditation in the frontispiece to show your dues.

That's how I think it goes. Best to check, though. :)

EDIT: There is a Sherlock Holmes society, that could probably give you info in your case. They're always keen to have the works publicised (in a positive way).
 
A Study in Scarlet can be had in a Project Gutenberg format so I would be willing to bet it is fully out of copyright. "inspected the rooms at 221B Baker Street" were enough for me to not need the foot note. But as far as pay for a Kindle or Nook editions, I believe you're paying for the cover and formatting.
 
It could just be me :) I feel wrong doing it and not giving it a reference. So you think just leave it ? I know it is out of copyright but I just wasn't sure how to do it without a page number.
 
Conan Doyle died on the 7th of July 1930, so his copyright became void on 1st January 2001 (because EU copyright persists for 70 years after the date of death, ending on the 31st December of that year).
 
Oh dear, do you really have to reference lines in other books that you use? I use Harvard for my uni work, it would look a little silly in text: 'from Atwood, (1985)...'
 
There's a reason I want to use the latin one if I need to ;) It could just be an erroneous assumption on my part. I'm paranoid about plagiarism because I have a stupid memory that comes out with lines that belong to other people. I now know if it doesn't sound like my work it probably isn't.
 
If you were worried about attribution, I think a much better way of doing it in the midst of a fiction piece would be simply to identify the book being read in the narrative.
 
There's a reason I want to use the latin one if I need to ;) It could just be an erroneous assumption on my part. I'm paranoid about plagiarism because I have a stupid memory that comes out with lines that belong to other people. I now know if it doesn't sound like my work it probably isn't.


You are quoting the text as he reads it from the book. If you had one character say it as a line, then I'd understand your concern on attribution.
 

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