Les Rois Maudits / The Accursed Kings by Maurice Druon

Joined
Mar 25, 2013
Messages
5
This classic series by French author Maurice Druon is being reprinted and repackaged in English by HarperCollins. The first volume, entitled The Iron King, has just been released.

I've been wanting to get my hands on these books for a couple of years but the previous English translations are out of print and copies are relatively rare and expensive. Hopefully these new versions are successful enough that HarperCollins will release the entire series.

For those who aren't familiar with the books, the series was originally written in the 1950s and covers the fall of the French Capetian dynasty and the rise of the House of Valois during the 14th century.

GRRM sums it up well:

"Iron kings and strangled queens, battles and betrayals, lies and lust, the curse of the Templars, the doom of a great dynasty – and all of it (well, most of it) straight from the pages of history, and believe me, the Starks and the Lannisters have nothing on the Capets and Plantagenets. Whether you are a history buff or a fantasy fan, Druon's epic will keep you turning pages. This was the original game of thrones"
- George R.R. Martin
 
Let me know how these go - they're being promoted quite heavily as a major influence on GRRM, but my reading list is absolutely packed. I can make room for mediaeval historical fiction, though, if convinced it's good. :)
 
Just put it on my Kindle. I'm working through Patrick O'Brian's first book, but will get to Druon thereafter.
 
I vaguely recall watching the first (French) TV adaptation of Les Rois Maudits on BBC2 in, I think, the mid seventies. My main memory of the series, apart from the minimal scenery (which didn't seem to be a problem), is of intrigues during the reign of Louis X; later on, the "She Wolf of France" provided a focus for the story.
 
I have giving up half way through and will not be continuing with the series. I am not too sure what George was on when recomending the series, maybe he got a large fee, but his own works are far superior. On the HF front Sharon Penman also does a better job.

My main gripe, amongst many, is the painstakingly obvious plotting of the story.
 
I don't recall seeing this thread back when it was started, but as soon as I saw the title today I thought I recognised the books, but since I'd never heard of the author I was getting very confused. Then the ah-ha moment came!
I vaguely recall watching the first (French) TV adaptation of Les Rois Maudits on BBC2 in, I think, the mid seventies. My main memory of the series, apart from the minimal scenery (which didn't seem to be a problem), is of intrigues during the reign of Louis X; later on, the "She Wolf of France" provided a focus for the story.
My memories are even vaguer, just the title and the She-Wolf of France, and a feeling of being utterly entranced by these intrigues!
 
I gave this another go a few months back and on second reading I can see the attraction. The style is similar to another writer, Hella S. Hasse, who in my opinion wrote one of the greatest works ever in HF. Her novel In A Dark Wood Wandering is evocative, philoshopical, contemplative and exciting in almost equal measures. She has a description of Agincourt in it that was seared into my memory. All told from the French side, which was interesting in itself.
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
J Star Trek (TV series) 0

Similar threads


Back
Top