Reasons why you SHOULD read WoT (no spoilers).

Erin99

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...and reasons why authors should especially read it. :D

My partner's a huuuge WoT fan and convinced me to give it a go. Well, without giving any spoilers (I've only just started book four, so please no spoilers!), I can say that I curled up on the couch and opened the first page. After a loooong prologue that I enjoyed enough to finish (and it left sooo many questions!), I flicked to chapter one... and was immediately back in the Shire. While I don't know if this was a wise move of Jordan's or not, I enjoyed my trip to the Shire (*cough* The Two Rivers *cough*). This gave the first quarter of the book a cosy feel and I got lost in the pages. However, the plot seemed generic - how can my partner LOVE this? I thought. But I read on, following the book's one POV character (well, just about!), and things got interesting. Overall, though, I really enjoyed some aspects even though I would say the book wasn't wow.

So, that doesn't sound like a good way to start a thread titled "Reasons to read WoT". Fear not. After constant cajoling from my partner, I picked up book two even though I felt there were better adventures I could go on in other books. Well, that went right out the window from chapter... three or so onwards (I can't remember exactly)! Suddenly, I discover Jordan had made a wrong decision - or a right decision, in some respects - to start the opening of book one very Tolkienish. It left Tolkien behind and became its own thing - a beast of a monster, with a world very different - and a society very different - to other series. The plot just spiralled and left me whizzing through the chapters, enjoying tons of new POVs (from characters I already knew) and moments of awe and wonder. Book three has gone exactly the same way, and has turned out to be my favourite. I've been assured I will like book four even more. :eek:

So, since I’d heard a lot about the negatives of WoT over the years, I thought I would start this thread to balance that. In fact, I think Jordan is a true master. Everything he does has been so top notch, and his world is so rich and vivid, I don't care that his prose is only "plain glass" as opposed to "stained glass", as Brandon Sanderson calls it.

So, here are the things writers can learn from Jordan:

1) Worldbuilding. It's absolutely jaw-droppingly amazing! Rich world, beautifully described, vast, with lands that really feel unique. People sound different depending on where they come from, and they look and act different from each other. And some ideas/places leave you in awe of their sheer creativity and beauty!

2) Characters. They feel fresh and original, and have proper cares and interests that have shaped them - and continue to influence them, for good or ill. Yes, characters change and grow. Also, the characters aren't intrinsically "good" or "bad", or - what seems to be preferred these days - "grey". They're human. Understandable. Relatable. Emotional. I like them all, so far, though one POV character - who starts from book three onwards - does seem to stand out, for me, because he's a fun, active character who's got free-reign to do what he wants instead of being herded and prodded by the world's puppeteers (yes, there are some people who try to... push people to follow what they want them to do). Saying that, even his reactive characters are loveable because of the situations they're in, and that's incredibly hard to do. Most reactive characters are boring, because they follow and nod, not leap off the page like Jordan's do.

3) Plot. This is up there on-par with Jordan's worldbuilding. His interweaving of epic plotlines works seamlessly through the novels I've read, and collide into each other at the end of every book - with spectacular, world-changing results. The plot is so epic in scale, even if it is a "farmboy needs to save the world" plot. There's not a single chapter that is wasted or "filler". I've learned a lot about plotting from reading it, because I realise that chapters I thought were needed in my novel really aren't up to par - at all; whenever Jordan opens a new chapter in someone else's POV, we're whisked away by mystery or action within pages. There's always something unexpected and gripping going on all the time, along with a huuue over-arching plot. Really, if a writer wants to learn how to make an amazing epic fantasy, this book is a must-read. I place it higher than GRRM (whose prose seems quite dry in comparison). Also, the ending to book three just leaves you.... wow. Oh, I wish I could say! Jordan has turned something on its head and left me dreading - and excited – to find out what the real... issue(? Can't think of a better word – I’m tired) is like.

4) Prose. Wow. Just... wow. I know I said Jordan was "stained glass", but that has no effect on how his writing makes you feel. I find his writing cosy like no other. It's writing that isn't dry and bland. It evokes feelings in the reader and really captures a sense of the place he's writing about. And if you're reading with your reader's brain instead of your writer's brain, the descriptions really flesh out the world - and some of the images created leave you with such a feeling of wonder. Writers can learn a lot from him about word use and richness. I see so many wannabe authors being very... technical... in their writing, for want of a better word, picking the best words for the job required. But Jordan goes beyond this and his prose comes to life.


Now... I'm going to go out on a limb here and say something. I might regret it later, once I've read the whole series, or you might come on and say I'm wrong, but... all these people that complain about how Jordan's stories are slow and have too much worldbuilding in them... I think the few-book lag that I've heard about in the middle of the series is the cause of it. I can't see how anyone could hate it, otherwise. Right now, where I am in the series, I have nothing but awe and amazement that one man can pull off such a well-paced, well-plotted, intricate, epic story with loveable and exciting characters. Everything is first rate. I wonder if old fans would be less harsh if they’d not had to wait two years plus between weak books. I'll find out, I suppose... Oh, and my partner says the series finishes strongly, so that bodes well. I look forward to my adventure!


Right! After that long post, I’m off to rest. I hope I've convinced some to give the series a try. :)


EDIT: And please, no spoilers in this thread for people who haven't picked up the books!
 

Talysia

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I'm glad you're enjoying them, Leisha.:)

I must admit, when I picked up The Eye of the World for the first time, I found it difficult to read because of the similarities to Tolkien. As time's gone by, though, when I reread the series, I was able to appreciate it better, and I enjoyed them a lot more. I also found that my opinions on certain characters changed a lot, too, although that probably has a lot to do with hindsight.

I will say one thing, though - watch out for foreshadowing as you read. As you get further into the series, you find that Jordan dropped quite a few clues into the early books.;)

Because I'm primarily a reader first, I've never thought to read the series from the point of view of a writer. Now that the series has finished, I wonder if I should reread it again at some point with that in mind. Well, that or to pick up on some of the earlier examples of foreshadowing.

Hope you enjoy Book 4!:)
 

Brian G Turner

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I tried reading "Eye of the World" one time, but only got a few pages into the prologue. I think the biggest reason for not reading further is that I've seen too many threads complaining about how the overall story had turned into novels about little digressions.

I do have it back on my shelf, though, as I figure I should at least read book one, even if no further!
 

ragtagblues

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Well it's quite pleasing to hear so many positives about WoT and Robert Jordan Leisha and as you say - The Wheel of Time must always have balance . . . .

Leisha please prepare yourself for books 6, 7, 8 and 9! They are very poor books; but please persevere with them as it starts to get better by book 10 and by book 14 you'll be a wreck of a human being.

My advice for the series is perseverance and to ignore the majority of female characters wherever possible . . . .
 

Memnoch

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I think the key to this thread is you have just started book 4, I'll await to see similar enthusiasm at the end of book 8 .... I stopped there. Just bad, frustrating memories of months of my life reading those. Still I hope you find something I didn't in them.
 

Erin99

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Grrr! I realise now that I should have written "functional", not "technical", in my first post. It alters the whole meaning - in the wrong way! I knew there was something bugging me about that word! Shows I shouldn't write when I need rest. :mad:

Anyway, another positive of Jordan's is that he's got a fantastic magic system - one of the best. I LOVE it! And his plot puzzles. I LOVE puzzles!


Taly, I hoped you would reply. I knew you were a huge fan, so I thought you might like to know that I've joined you. I've been studiously watching out for foreshadowing, too - it's my default in all books. I love puzzles, I write them in my own work, and WoT is FULL of them! It's like at the end of every chapter my head does a roundup of all the puzzles and tries to guess what they all mean. I've guessed some right so far! Some obvious ones I missed, though... And I know there'll be even bigger, more subtle ones I'll have missed for later books.

So, I hope you get some enjoyment out of rereading with your writer's eye. There's so much you can take from the series. Sure, there's a lag in the middle (what huge series doesn't have it, and other flaws?), but there's so much positive. Reading these books has been very transformative for me. I've changed my whole outlook to my series (for the better, I hope!). I've heard that the WoT has inspired so many greats, too - Sanderson, Rothfuss, GRRM (you can definitely see the scenes that inspired GRRM’s A Song of Ice and Fire, and he included a nod to Jordan with one of his golden-quill banners in A Clash of Kings), etc. And Jordan was inspired by the man himself, Tolkien! :D

I suppose part of the reason I've got into these books is that I find I write in a similar style (not as good, though, grrr!) and I actually have two almost identical scenes to some of his in his second book (oops!) and some others, and certain word choices he uses are making me unsettled, and a fair few of his ideas, because I'm now going to have to go back and rephrase so I don't seem as if I'm copying him. I'm even having to change my rulers' titles - High Lords and High Ladies - so I don't seem as if I've nicked those, too. :eek: I especially have to be careful, since I've turned out to be so big a fan - don't wanna look like I've stolen everything when I haven't; I'd written mine years and years ago!

I prefer Jordan's style, though - with formal narration in between direct and indirect thoughts - as opposed to authors who use very close POV all the time, like Abercrombie. I think it fits the genre better (in my opinion), and it's what I write.

And thanks, Taly. I am LOVING book four! It's sped off from the opening page, and there's so much going on...


Brian - the first book gets about 3-3.5 stars on Amazon, and while it's a good enough adventure story that builds to a very good climax, you *have* to get halfway through book two before you decide how you feel about reading on. I probably wouldn't have picked up book two for years if Seph hadn't cajoled me into doing so (I'm thankful he did!). By halfway through book two, max, you'll have seen that Jordan very much comes into his own and has created something vast and new. And, by that point, you should be hooked. ;)

But please, don't put the book down before you've even begun it because of reviews of later books. That's putting other people's opinions over your own, and it's not being fair to the phenomenal first few books. People will always prefer to complain than sing praises; when people are happy about something, they don't get so up-in-arms about telling the world how awful the thing is. And, by all accounts, the series has a slowness for three books, then roars along till the end. That can't be too bad, especially since we wouldn't have to wait years between reading books. :)


ragtagblues (nice name, and hello!) - yes! Thought I'd get some saidar out into the world to balance the saidin I see everywhere on these forums. ^_~


And don't worry, I WILL read all the books. I'm actually curious to see the difference in a reader reading them without pausing, when I'll be more forgiving than you guys who waited years. I've heard differently to what you say, though. My partner's a huuuuge WoT fan, though he, like everyone else, was frustrated at the slow books. He says it's only books 8-10 that are slow. Apparently, in his opinion, book seven is still hailed as a great, though it's a wee bit shorter and starts to lag a little near the end; book eight is just slow; book nine is slow but has a phenomenal ending, really fantastic (which makes it worthwhile); and book ten is just slooooow. But, from then on the pace picks up and the books return to being full-length, marching on with the plot. And then Sanderson comes in for books 12-14 and ruthlessly hacks the rest so they're *very* pacy and incredible...

... though he struggles a bit to keep some of the characters' voices consistent to what readers have come to love, until the last book or so. Speaking of characters, I have no problem with the women. I don't even have a problem with braid-pulling (that just one character's flaw, like mine is serious lip-biting and nail-picking). I find the women believable and true to their backgrounds, not made to fit what our modern-day selves think women should be.

Anyway, what I'm looking forward to is reading the final chapters of the series. They will repay my months of reading. I will be satisfied, I think, because it closes brilliantly (from what I've heard) and is one of the best tales out there. Plus, I need to know what happens to the characters! Apparently, Jordan wrote the ending to the series before anything else, because he knew exactly how it should be. I'd love to see that, the blend of Branderson/Jordan until the final, epic ending by the great man himself. That would be so sad, to think the man never lived to see his dream ending in print... And yet, the ending would also be fitting. The man rounds off the series he started, bring his beautiful, epic tale full circle.




Edit: oops! I called Sanderson "Branderson"! Argh! I keep doing that! It was a slip of the tongue about a year ago, and my brain has never forgotten it. I suppose it's trying to cut unnecessary words, like I do in my writing. ;p

Oh, and hello, Memnoch! Please read my above paragraph to ragtagblues. It sums up how I feel about those slow books. ^_^
 

Erin99

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Just a further thought - Memnoch, how can you put a series down because of one book? I know the series gets slow, but if you love the characters, world, and story, you'd keep going because you have to.

Perhaps you didn't love the series at all, then, rather than one book?


And, remember: I am not you. You can't put your opinions on me (that sounds worse than I mean it! :eek:). I already have my thoughts, from long hours reading. Yes, I've just started book four, but I've also lived a long time with the characters - I'm not a noob starting at the beginning - and I've made my choice about the series because I've fallen in love with it. If, by the end of book fourteen, I get a satisfying ending, I will be happy. More than happy, actually. :)



Oh, and I should make something clear. Some of the opinions about future books in my past post were mine, not Seph's, from hearing hints from various sources (but not spoilers!). Oh, and the post makes it look as if Seph believed that book seven is hailed as great by some, whereas that was actually my opinion (oops!). Some find it great, others don't. It divides opinion, with some saying it's got a really good end and only tiny parts where it lags. And it might not lag as much as I've come to expect, too... Ooh! I'm very excited to read and find out!

RAFO, as the great man himself would say. :)
 
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Talysia

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Thanks to this thread, I'm going to reread the series again - this time with a writer's eye for details and plot points. My own style tends to be rather simple, so I might just learn something, even if it's only for the writing contests here. I'm hoping that something can inspire me to write again, as my muse has run off with my backbone, so to speak (I've been struggling with both inspiration and confidence of late.:)).

The first time I read through the series, I didn't pick up on half the clues and foreshadowing that was mentioned in the books. I read about some of them here, or on other forums, and some I picked up after a reread, but it really surprised me at how many of these little clues were mentioned later in the books, or became plot points later on. I think I'll be paying attention to all of Min's viewings on this readthrough, given the ending.

I've made the same observation myself about the issues some have with later books. Personally, I came to the series 5 years ago, and was able to read through it fairly quickly. The lack of action in the later books didn't strike me as hard as some, as I could just move straight on to the next, but for those who waited two or more years for a book in which the story didn't seem to advance as much as they were hoping, I can understand the frustration. I've heard it said that those slower books (for want of a better word) might have been improved by a bit more editing, but it's a matter of personal taste, I suppose. It's hard to talk about which specifics of the story have gathered the most negativity amongst fans/readers without giving away spoilers, but I think it's great that you're forming your own opinion as you go.:)

It's nice to see the opinions of someone reading through the series for the first time. Welcome to the club!:)
 

Erin99

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Glad to be in the club!

If this thread has helped someone to give the series a go, or - in your case - give it another read with a different eye, I'm glad I started it. I hoped the thread wouldn't just turn into a "No, it sucks. Here's why" type.

And really, I feel the amount of negativity the series gets is unfair, based on what I've read. For the sheer enjoyment I've had out of books 1-3 alone, I could not slate Jordan. I've loved every minute.

So, anyway... I've always paused on Min sections. There seems to be a lot of weight behind her talent, so I've never shrugged her off. Mustn't say more here, though.

Glad to hear you didn't find the book lags impassable, though. That's heartening! From what I hear of the lags, yes, they could have been edited more, but I think the main issue is that Jordan dragged out one or more plot threads too far, so the thrust of the story halted. I'm interested to see what he dragged out! I've not read spoilers.





I hope you find your confidence, though. We all suffer those periods. If there's anything I can do to help you, let me know. I always enjoyed your entries in the challenges, back when I used to take part. Yours were stories with heart, which I think sums you up perfectly. :)

How about writing an intricate fantasy novelette, if you haven't done so already? Or a short story (like, up to 7,000 words)? Or a different genre altogether, if not a different style? Might help your muse and confidence better than getting bogged down in huge novel. And you might find it easier to place in a market, which would give you added confidence to write more...
 

Talysia

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I think you've hit the nail on the head about plot threads in those later books. There were a couple that I thought were unnecessary and dragged out, and didn't really add much to the overall story, but I won't go into details. I found there were a few too many different POV characters sometimes, too. It didn't detract too much for me, though. Maybe I'm just easy to please with books.

Looking forward to your opinions on the other books, too.:)

Thanks for the compliments about my entries in the challenge. I'm starting to write again, although inspiration is still a little scarce. Once I get a good idea or two, I'll just write it down, in the same way I used to, and let it flow. Trying to keep it short will help, too. Thinking too much makes me hesitate sometimes.
 

ratsy

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I did a reread of the first 4 books and then have plodded through all the way up to the 12th which i am currently reading. Besides a few dull story lines along the way, this series has been great. I know people seem to have many critisisms about Jordan but IMO he has created a masterpiece when looking at it from a broad standpoint.

People have cited similarities between it and LOTR and The Sword Of Truth but all in all they are completely different. I am more than happy that Harriet selected Brandon Sanderson to finish the series. He is my top Author at the moment and his addition seems to be fantastic (i am 120pages into his first wot book)

There are many great reasons to read this series and I am more than thankful I decided to take the journey. It has caused me to get behind in reading a lot of other stuff I want to but its worth it.

I actually ordeded A Memory of Light cover print signed by the artist Michale Whelan, Brandon Sanderson and i guess Harriet Jordan and the WOT editor signed it as well.

It is a pretty cool thing and even though i have never bought something like this it is worth the 100 dollars. It is 2'x3' ...check out the artists website
 

Clansman

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Another reason to read it: it is a modern epic fantasy that is actually finished. A rare breed indeed.

(are you listening, GRRM?)
 

Memnoch

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Just a further thought - Memnoch, how can you put a series down because of one book? I know the series gets slow, but if you love the characters, world, and story, you'd keep going because you have to.

Perhaps you didn't love the series at all, then, rather than one book?


And, remember: I am not you. You can't put your opinions on me (that sounds worse than I mean it! :eek:). I already have my thoughts, from long hours reading. Yes, I've just started book four, but I've also lived a long time with the characters - I'm not a noob starting at the beginning - and I've made my choice about the series because I've fallen in love with it. If, by the end of book fourteen, I get a satisfying ending, I will be happy. More than happy, actually. :)



Oh, and I should make something clear. Some of the opinions about future books in my past post were mine, not Seph's, from hearing hints from various sources (but not spoilers!). Oh, and the post makes it look as if Seph believed that book seven is hailed as great by some, whereas that was actually my opinion (oops!). Some find it great, others don't. It divides opinion, with some saying it's got a really good end and only tiny parts where it lags. And it might not lag as much as I've come to expect, too... Ooh! I'm very excited to read and find out!

RAFO, as the great man himself would say. :)
You may have misread my post. It is but my opinion, I also, as stated hope you derive more pleasure from the series than I.

I gave up after 8 books or maybe 9, the one with Winter in the title, I have it in hardback on one of my bookshelves. So as you can see it is a judgement based on more than one title. I have a real dislike for the series now to be honest similarly to Terry Goodkinds work, a great premise spoiled by the author after a few promising novels, then find they have wasted my time, like a three month relationship and finding out the person you are with are not really who they lead you to believe. As I say just a simple readers opinion.
 

Erin99

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Oh, Memnoch, I'm sorry if my post came across as argumentative. :eek: Anyone who knows me knows I wouldn't do that! I apologise sincerely for it, if it's the case. I was in quite a bit of pain after writing the long post, because working on the computer causes me difficulties, and I didn't give myself enough time to rest before writing the other one. I don't think as straight as usual after working for long periods (I feel like my thoughts are between cotton wool), and I was rushing to post, so I could have been far clearer and nicer-sounding. But that's not an excuse. I need to give myself more time before I reply to posts, even if I feel rushed to reply, or else things like this can happen.

I'll try to be clearer, although I have been super tired these last couple of days. What I meant was that you said "I think the key to this thread is you have just started book 4, I'll await to see similar enthusiasm at the end of book 8", which makes it sounds as if my opinion about the series isn't as valid as people who've read further (which is right in one way, but not in another). So, I was trying to get across that, even if I've only read a handful of books, I've still spent enough time in the world to know how I feel and, like I said, I have a feeling I might be more forgiving of its flaws because I haven't had to wait years between books.

I'm sorry you've come to hate the series as vehemently as you have, though. I couldn't imagine giving up on the characters - I love them too much, and I *have* to know the endings to all the mysteries. I've heard that the ending is very satisfying, so if you ever pick up the series again, you might get a happy ending. :)

And I also meant that you gave up on the series - several books in or more, at least - after disliking one book, not that you gave up the series after the first book. Oh, how I wish I'd been clearer! So, I wasn't being argumentative, only trying to find out how you could give up on something you'd invested so much time - and love - in. I was trying to understand. :)

See, I started this thread with the intention that it would be a positive one to balance out the many negative ones here, and your post didn't take cognisance of that (indeed, your posts may even put off some would-be fans) even though you were nice and wished I would find more enjoyment out of the books than you did. Any non-Jordan fan looking through this Jordan sub-forum would not give him the time of day, looking at all the negative thread titles. But I think he IS worth it, so this thread is my way of attracting more readers, because I believe the first few books alone merit a huge amount of praise. In fact, given how much enjoyment and wonder I feel for the books, it would not be a lie to say the WoT is my all-time favourite series.



But... I shall have to disagree about Terry Goodkind vs. Jordan. ;) Terry's very preachy, or so I've heard. It's been years since I tried to read his first book; I've forgotten most of it.



ratsy - wow! I looked at the artist's site - http://www.michaelwhelan.com/ - OMG! I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE his work! And I love the site. You're very lucky, having the signed print.


Clansman - exactly! It's nice to know I've started something that I'll be able to finish, and - if the hearsay is true - it will finish with a very satisfying end. I'm excited to be on the journey, more excited than I've ever been with any other series, weirdly.
 

ratsy

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I think one of the problems people have with the series is the pacing of books 8-10. I can understand their trepidation if they had to wait 2 years between books. But reading them all in a row, the pacing felt fine. I am looking at it as a massive story rather than 1 book at a time.

I will agree with you that this has become one of my favorite series, mainly for the huge scope in which it covers. Jordan could have plowed through this story in 5 books probably but it would not have been the same and I am glad it was stretched to the limit.

And I cannot wait to see what happens!
 

woodsman

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I have yet to read the last book but found it to be something like this:

The first three books comprise one of my favourite trilogys with the next being almost as good after that he wondered further from the beaten track before pulling it all back together (with brandersons help!). His portrayal of women annoyed me though, I still can't think of a single one that I liked.

World building is one of the things I appreciate most in a book and on a slow afternoon its not that unusual to find myself somewhere in his world.

(Hope you and Speh are both well leish!!)
 

Erin99

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For any of you still unconvinced, here's a few words from John Jarrold, posted with his permission:


John Jarrold said:
I was the original UK publisher of the first three volumes, back when I ran Orbit in the late 1980s/early 90s. I can still recall the huge enthusiasm with which I read THE EYE OF THE WORLD. Jumped up and down at my colleagues and insisted we took on the series!

I still tell new writers to look at the first fifty pages of EYE, to see how the author uses POV thoughts and dialogue to put across the background and characters with no info-dumps, while also engaging the reader in the story. It's terrifically well done.

I know there are negative thoughts about later books in the series, but I find it both stupid and arrogant of new writers to sneer at Jordan. Those opening books in the series still fill me with pleasure when I re-read them and I would recommend them to anyone who loves fantasy fiction. He is one of the best storytellers with whom I've ever worked. He told me that he'd spent a year building the world before he wrote the first word of the first book.

I got on really well with Jim Rigney - Jordan's real name. The last time we met and chatted was at the 2001 World Fantasy Convention in Montreal...
I really don't know how else I can convince people to give the books a try. They're SO engaging! Lately, I've even been thinking I should go back and re-read book one, now I'm as huge a fan as I am. My mind forgets things VERY quickly, in hours sometimes, yet I realise that there were so many things I loved about the first book, since there are mentions of them in book four and I suddenly think, "Oh! That was cool! How did I forget about that?!" And then, even though I remember loving it, I struggle to recall what exactly made it so cool/intriguing/mysterious/terrifying, since I read book one over three years ago.

I wish I had a photographic memory! Or any sort of memory, really. :D


Ratsy - you make me VERY eager to get to the "slow" books, now. I want to see what my opinion is. Perhaps, as you say, the overall story won't seem so dipped in pace if you read the books together.

Woody - long time no see! SO glad to see you still around! Hello, friend (Ogier?) Woodsman! (Oh, I LOVE Loial!!!)

Seph and I are doing very well - been together for... five years, thanks to this forum (blimey! How the Wheel of Time passes!). He's at uni, being an A student, and I'm... well, the same as ever. But still trying to write!!! I'll never give up writing! And at least when I have to rest on the couch, I have the WoT to visit when my cotton-wool mind will let me. ;)
 

Gamblor

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I just started reading the first book - I am reading from a writers perspective and have, so far, found the writing to be very good, if a little long winded. The world building aspect is particularly well done but in those first 200 pages or so I did think perhaps there is too much going on.

Maybe I am a little cynical but often I was like 'woah - calm down Jordan!'

Still, excellently well done. I will probably read the first 4 books because I have heard so much criticism for the later ones, I am not sure I will have the patience.
 

Erin99

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Feb 28, 2007
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Hello, Gamblor!

I think the "long-winded writing", as you put it, actually benefits the story. If you shut off your writer's eye and just read as a reader, the world becomes so fascinating and rich. I can't get enough of the details. Once I finish the series, I shall be reading The World of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time and the novella, New Spring, which are on the bookshelf in front of me. :)

Also, I think I differ slightly from you in that if I see a book or opening that has lots going on (which lives up to what it has set up), I see it as a fantastic thing. It shows from the off that Jordan's writing epic fantasy, with multiple plots and characters. The story only gets more epic and intertwined - but it's rip-roaring all the way through (and I'm on book four!).

And, Gamblor - once you get past book three and its OMG(!!!) ending, you won't be able to resist book four. And let me tell you, there's two chapters in book four, in the middle, that will have you shaking (and putting the book down to reflect on the momentous moment you've just seen!). You see things you never thought you'd get to see..........

Book four beats book three, IMO.



Edit: Another point I should make, for any would-be readers, since this point has been raised a few times: you need to remember that female characters are females grown up on Jordan's world, not ours, so you can't expect them to share our traits and feministic views. I praise Jordan enough for reversing gender roles in the series already (though you don't get to see much of that in book one, unfortunately, which is its downside because it makes the world more unique). Personally, I think his females are true to themselves, based on where they grew up and what influences were on them as children.
 
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Gamblor

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Jun 10, 2010
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Hey Leisha,

I think it is a fine line an author has to tread between 'enticing' and 'too much'. As a reader looking for epic fantasy, I think Jordan has done an exemplary job in this opener - I don't what it is when I put on my own 'author' cap but I just get a bit more cynical, hence my previous point.

I read the first book of Stephen Kings 'Dark Tower' series, The Gunslinger and I thought this was an excellent opening for its light sprinkling of references to the world around it. Perhaps somewhere in between the two is good for me (the second book of Dark Tower I thought terrible though and have not picked up the third yet).

Anyway, I am really looking forward to the next 3 WoT. Bring 'em on!
 
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