Brian Aldiss - short and long fiction

clovis-man

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Not sure how Amazon works for New Zealand, but Kindle editions of each Helliconia volume are available for $3.99 U.S.
 

Fried Egg

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Grrr. Need to vent...
Well, the used copies of the 3 Helliconia books arrived from Ebay - all different sellers. I specifically searched high and low for copies descibed as excellent or very good condition. Turns out that they are all in very 'average' condition (i.e. beaten up, badly cracked spines, water damaged etc, and I just cannot read/own such books. Given the shipping was much more than the books themselves, I cannot return them without being more out of pocket, so I shall be throwing them out and now I still don't have readable copies of the books and I'm about NZD$50 down! Bollocks, as they say. Not that that's in any way a commentary on Aldiss or authors or SF, its just me mouthing off, but I needed to. Grrr.
Surely, they would have been worth reading through once, even if you didn't keep them? :confused:
 

Caliban

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I've always thought that with Aldiss the vast majority of his work isn't very good and then there are about 5 novels and a handful of shorts that are beyond compare 10 out of 10s. Which I just find odd.
 

tylenol4000

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I picked up Helliconia Spring. Looking forward to eventually reading it. I heard Brian Aldiss was really disappointed that the series never became more popular. It's not exactly considered a classic, from what I can tell.
 

clovis-man

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I picked up Helliconia Spring. Looking forward to eventually reading it. I heard Brian Aldiss was really disappointed that the series never became more popular. It's not exactly considered a classic, from what I can tell.
Since it's a multi-generational epic, it doesn't hang together quite as easily as something like Zelazny's Amber novels or Cherryh's Faded Sun series. Nevertheless, it is quite absorbing and quite worth the effort to piece it together.
 

Stephen Palmer

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I picked up Helliconia Spring. Looking forward to eventually reading it. I heard Brian Aldiss was really disappointed that the series never became more popular. It's not exactly considered a classic, from what I can tell.
It is well thought of, but for some unknown reason it isn't deemed a classic - which it should be.

Aldiss himself once remarked to Dave Langford that an SF trivia quiz book he'd been involved with was earning him more than Helliconia...

That's sad. :(
 

TonyHarmsworth

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I find it very hard to pick any particular favorite from this author. All of his work seems to be good, solid writing. I am mostly familiar with older works, so I might think of Cryptozoic (AKA An Age) for a long work and "Poor Little Warrior" for a short work.
Cryptozoic was a really difficult one to get your mind around. You had to believe the scenario in order for the book to be readable and, of course, the scenario was nonsense. I think Aldiss' real skill was in forcing you to believe in nonsense because you knew a brilliant story was contained within it.
 

TonyHarmsworth

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In response to Venusian Broon's avatar.
This is not a reply to your post, but a compliment upon your avatar. I was a great Dan Dare fan and have all of the Mike Hicks hardback compilations of the stories. Shame he never tackled the ones which weren't in the normal format - he couldn't make them fit the compilation format. Anyway, your avatar took me straight back to the Mekon. He looks good with a tash.
 

Fried Egg

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I've finished my re-read of 'Helliconia Spring' and still think it is a classic but stand by my original observation that the human characters are not really the central focus of the book. This is evidenced by the fact of how abruptly the story ends with various plot lines left unresolved and one can only wonder what happened to many of the characters.

As I've said previously, I don't really see this as a flaw but I can see why some readers don't like this.
 

Stephen Palmer

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The beauty of the novel is that, while Helliconia is vast and grand and the focus, all the human characters are small and flawed and so are wonderful to read about. It's an exceptional trilogy.
 
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