Douglas Adams, Hitchhiker Trilogy.

  1. Tiffany

    Tiffany Well-Known Member

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    I found this series today, in a charity shop, Picador paperback version, I don't know who published it before.
    It isn't actually a trilogy, as there are 5 books in the pack.
    I have read the first two before & seen the TV series & the feature film, but didn't know until today there were more. I am very happy to have found them all together & seemingly unread as well.
    Just noticed their original price, £34.95. Good Heavens!!! I paid £4.:D
     
    Mar 3, 2012
    #1
  2. Jo Zebedee

    Jo Zebedee writes books about people.

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    Enjoy them, you have a treat ahead. And whatever you do, DON'T PANIC.
     
    Mar 3, 2012
    #2
  3. HoopyFrood

    HoopyFrood Have brain, will travel

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    Yup, the trilogy of five parts :D

    Well, technically six if you include the Eion Colfer-written last book. I've heard people say good things about it, and I really like the dude, but I prefer to just concentrate on Adams' brilliance.

    My name is a bit of a give away as to how much I like this series.
     
    Mar 3, 2012
    #3
  4. Ursa major

    Ursa major Bearly Believable Staff Member

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    I read that book fully prepared to dislike it. But I couldn't.

    It isn't Adams, but it's probably as near as we could or should expect it to be. My brief thoughts on the book (no spoilers).
     
    Mar 3, 2012
    #4
  5. hitmouse

    hitmouse Well-Known Member

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    Might have to look out the Coifer book. He is a good writer.
    The first two Hitchhiker books were brilliant, but I felt he went off the boil a little after that, and the fifth was a bit of a disappointment.

    I still think the original radio show is the highlight, and I can lay claim to have listened to the first broadcast of the first episode one night when I was about 11.
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #5
  6. Dave

    Dave Wherever I Am, I'm There Staff Member

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    Yes, it had cult status when I was in Sixth Form. I thought the books messed with the story too much, and the TV series and film even more so. The only thing they missed was making the Hitchhikers Game.
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #6
  7. pyan

    pyan Great Old One Staff Member

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    Mar 4, 2012
    #7
  8. Tiffany

    Tiffany Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to you all.
    I'll look out for the Eion Colfer book as well, Ursa major.
    I also have cassettes of Hitchhiker & Goodbye & Thanks for the Fish, but have not listened to either. They are very long. You need a few hours to sit & listen to them.
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #8
  9. Abernovo

    Abernovo Well-Known Member

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    Tiffany, if you like the books, you might want to check out the radio show recordings. You could probably borrow/rent them on CD from your local library.

    Just don't listen to them on headphones, walking down the street. Laughing to yourself gets very funny looks;):).

    EDIT, Ah, I see you've got copies of some of them. As Springs says, you're in for a treat. Have fun.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2012
    Mar 4, 2012
    #9
  10. Tiffany

    Tiffany Well-Known Member

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    I will try those too.:D
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #10
  11. Connavar

    Connavar Well-Known Member

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    Near ? It isnt Adams is enough for me not to be lured in by people trying to milk his fame when they cant copy his writing, humor.

    Im always alittle surprised by fans who are fan of series and not the author. Hitchhiker is nothing just another series without Adams writing.
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #11
  12. Dozmonic

    Dozmonic Well-Known Member

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    I've not read the Colfer one, but I grew up being well educated in Adams by my dad. I didn't enjoy the recent movie with its deviations from the book and radio, even with Zooey Deschandrooooool starring! The BBC series did a good job of covering it :)
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #12
  13. Vertigo

    Vertigo Mad Mountain Man

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    My first exposure was the radio series and I still love them the best. I have the whole lot on tape but it's been awhile....
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #13
  14. TheDustyZebra

    TheDustyZebra Inspired. Or possibly insane. Could go either way. Staff Member

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    After you're done with those, when you're wishing for more Adams, go for Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency and its stand-alone sequel, The Long Dark Tea-time of the Soul. Very different, but very Adams. :D
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #14
  15. HoopyFrood

    HoopyFrood Have brain, will travel

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    Let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all.
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #15
  16. j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd like to challenge you on some assumptions there, Conn.

    First: Are you sure this is their motivation? Perhaps it is, but perhaps it is rather -- as is quite common in the literary world, where even great authors have indulged in it -- a desire to emulate, to carry on a tradition, to perform an hommage to using the original writers' most famed creation... all of which are good, reasonable motivations, even if the result is seldom (though not never) great art.

    Second: Unless one is attempting to an entirely slavish imitation/pastiche, one should never try to copy the other writers' writing (by which I assum you mean style, idiom, etc.), though they may, while still remaining true to themselves, be in tune with the original writer's humor. It is much the better thing, if one is motivated by something such as I mention above, if they do try to remain true to their own voice while singing a song in honor of a friend, as it were.

    Third: One can be a fan either, or of both. And just because one takes pleasure in writings dealing with the original writer's creation which are performed by others is not necessarily a lack of respect for the first. It, too, can be motivated by many things, from simply enjoying further play in that particular mind field to a form of hommage of its own. Often it is a combination of many things.

    Several instances come to mind immediately. Harlan Ellison wrote an hommage which takes off from Fritz Leiber's "The Girl with the Hungry Eyes" and, "Nedra at f:5.6" is by no means his most successful work, it nonetheless has considerable merit. There have been anthologies of works by various writers dealing with Moorcock's characters and multiverse, all from each individual writer's perspective, and done with the encouragement and even participation of Moorcock himself; and many of the stories included in them are damn' fine pieces. Even before such anthologies, a number of writers were writing stories centering on his character of Jerry Cornelius, which he then published in New Worlds; such writers included Norman Spinrad, Brian Aldiss, M. John Harrison, James Sallis, Langdon Jones, etc. Lovecraft enjoyed seeing what other people did with some of his material, feeling that citations of such things by a number of writers added to the verisimilitude of the works, giving them the feeling of genuine myth, especially as some presented contradictions, just as all myth cycles tend to have variants of their prime tales. Honoré de Balzac wrote a direct sequel to Maturin's Melmoth the Wanderer, titled "Melmoth Reconcilie", which affectionately spoofed what he considered to be one of the great novels of all time. The German Romantics quite frequently borrowed from one or referred to one another's creations, utilizing them in their own works. The list is well-nigh endless.

    What makes the difference, I would say, is a combination of the actual motivation, and the honesty of the second writers' own approach -- that is, is it merely imitation, or an extension from their own artistic vision. If it is the former, most often such an effort fails because it lacks a life of its own. If the latter, it often succeeds because it is done with affection, respect, and integrity, and becomes a new facet in the prism of the original creation; not the same, no, but not necessarily lesser, either.

    Please note: I have not read the piece in question, nor do I expect to anytime in the future. While admiring Adams in many ways, I've never been that captivated by his work personally, so am not particularly inclined to follow on with it, no matter how good this one might be. But I do think it is important to question such a set of blanket assumptions which would rule out not only the lackluster pastiches which deserve no consideration, but also the many fine works which have enriched the world's literature as well, simply because they carried on where another writer left off.
     
    Mar 4, 2012
    #16
  17. gully_foyle

    gully_foyle Here kitty kitty kitty!

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    I read the book by Eoin Colfer. I think it is a homage to Adams, but not a replacement. The tone was off and the focus was not on Arthur. The quest for the cup of tea, or as I interpret it, sanity and calm in the face of an increasingly absurd universe, was mostly forgotten. Hitch Hikers was about Arthur and the Colfer book wasn't really.

    And for the record I thought Thanks For All The Fish was excellent, mainly because at the time I was in love with someone whose feet didn't touch the ground when she walked.
     
    Mar 5, 2012
    #17
  18. Galacticdefender

    Galacticdefender SUN STEALER

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    And don't forget your towel.
     
    Mar 24, 2012
    #18
  19. MontyCircus

    MontyCircus Well-Known Member

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    I thought the sequels very much paled in comparison with the first book, which I loved from cover to cover. I did like the third book (I think it was?) as it had a bit of a plot. The others I found virtually plot-less, repetitious and just not very funny.
     
    Feb 14, 2013
    #19
  20. Stephen Palmer

    Stephen Palmer author of novels

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    book 2 ain't bad, but the slide did begin imo from the third one.
     
    Feb 14, 2013
    #20
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