(Found) need help finding author and title

fallenkitsune

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2010
Messages
6
Years ago (5+) my grandmother had my aunt buy her an ebook from an author who recently died (at the time) and it was published after her death. The author believed she was reincarnated from the alien creatures from this story, its strange enough for me to remember that part of the prolog. I started the ebook but didn't finish it and i'd like to continue reading it but i've forgotten the title and author.

It was a book about people who were descended from vegetables and evolved into humanoids with green skin. They lived on a planet that had very harsh winds/weather and people died on a regular basis from it. I think they farmed moss in caves and other veggies to survive and if they did not get regular sunlight they wilted away and died. They believed the weather was sent to them by 'Gods' as punishment for something. Later in the story a young man was born with strange physical features and was herding sheep like creatures from patches of moss and found melons which tasted like nothing they'd eaten before. Eventually the story skipped several generations and the people are living under domes to protect them from the elements.

I stopped reading shortly into this part, does it sound familiar to anyone?
 

fallenkitsune

Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2010
Messages
6
Never mind i called my grandmother and she had the title and author written down. Its Gods of Green Mountain by V.C. Andrews.
 

Vertigo

Mad Mountain Man
Supporter
Joined
Jun 29, 2010
Messages
7,639
Location
Scottish Highlands
Thanks for updating us fallen! I must admit I have not come across that author and it does sound like a pretty strange story!
 

dannymcg

"Hold my beer, wait and see this!"
Joined
Sep 9, 2016
Messages
4,025
Location
Cumbria UK
Update on this old Search query:

I got a copy based on the original query, it sounded interesting.

Take my advice and don't repeat my mistake, it's utter sh*t.

The author is the same who wrote "Flowers in the attic", if you've read that and liked it then you might enjoy this, if you didn't then avoid it like the plague
 

Ravensquawk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2006
Messages
47
Update on this old Search query:

I got a copy based on the original query, it sounded interesting.

Take my advice and don't repeat my mistake, it's utter sh*t.

The author is the same who wrote "Flowers in the attic", if you've read that and liked it then you might enjoy this, if you didn't then avoid it like the plague
I like these kinds of warnings. There are some SF stories I can, to my endless regret, never unread.

Then, of course, there are others that leave me feeling *awful* but are good stories, of the Third Type Asimov called "If this goes on....." stories.
Like "Memorial" by Theodore Sturgeon.

Then there are the ones in between. George R.R. Martin leaves you feeling crappy - but they're so *good*.

Then there is the remedy for useless, unhealing illness: stopping reading any Neil Gaiman.
 

hitmouse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
1,816
Can you expand on your disdain for Neil Gaiman please?
 

Ravensquawk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2006
Messages
47
I would, but the detail is lost. A friend lent me a book of his short stories, and while (per my above post) I value dire-threat "If This Goes On" stories as gripping moral warnings, his stories just left me feeling revulsion and depression and being grossed out. I'm not even sure which it was - Fragile Things or Smoke and Mirrors? I think I've gotten through How to talk to Girls at Parties online twice. All the stories I find life-changingly memorable, and I don't remember whether I even want to remember that one.

Some of Martin's stories did too, and I don't overdo him any more, but "The Monkey Treatment" and "Sandkings" left me feeling about the same way, they were still goood. I just may never read them again!
And then, while "With Morning Comes Mistfall" was sad, it was just litlingly sad, without the revulsion.

I've noticed that some stories and occasionally films that people just looooooove leave me feeling revulsion without giving any value -- a good moral story, good interactions, thoughtful learning -- in return.
(Hey No Country for Old Men and The Talented Mr. Ripley and The Godfather -- I'm talkin' to YOU!)

I'm not putting a dog in a fight; I'm saying how really, egregiously, sickly *lousy* I felt after his stories.
Not even saying I won't give it another try, but there are a lot of things I would do and read first.
 

hitmouse

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
1,816
@Ravensquawk thanks. I was curious. Fair enough. I think you are possibly missing out here. An author as varied, complex, funny, and basically humane as Gaiman is arguably worth judging on more than a dimly- remembered book of short stories.
 

Ravensquawk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2006
Messages
47
@Ravensquawk thanks. I was curious. Fair enough. I think you are possibly missing out here. An author as varied, complex, funny, and basically humane as Gaiman is arguably worth judging on more than a dimly- remembered book of short stories.
It could happen! I replied because other stories by other authors left me feeling the same way. You know, at the other end of the spectrum from the many SF stories I crave so much I have to reread them every few years.

If I never read "The Last Article" by Harry Turtledove again, it will still be too soon.
Same for "The Man Who Came Early" and "A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court".
Maybe even "Sandkings" is, to quote Herb Caen or someone, like having children or washing the car: better to have done than to be doing. Once is enough. I'm over it.
(Well, unless I'm unfortunate enough to think about it.)

(Someone with the sensitivity better than that of a cactus might even notice that there is a common theme of violence against decent people. But I didn't decide that and then grade stories like I were reviewing a thesis; I just noticed that was a characteristic, after the fact of feeling sick and revulsed.)

Lovecraft does not leave me feeling that way, because his stories are fantasy, not science fiction, and you already know they are horror stories.
But those others -- too real. Now that is horror.
 
Top