What I've always liked about Clarke's work...

Rosemary Fryth

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...is the believabilty of his novels. They all seem to be based on solid scientific principles. With fantasy I can accept the totally wild and bizarre, however with sci-fi there must be a strong element of 'this could actually happen' running through his books.

Clarke I think was called somewhere a modern day prophet for his accuracy in predicting the creation of satellites, and I think in 'Imperial Earth' I recollect him mentioning a device very similar to our current tablet computers.

My favourite Clarke novels would have to be '2001-A Space Odyssey' and 'Rendezvous with Rama', although I do enjoy reading his short stories.
 

J-Sun

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"The best way to predict the future is to invent it." -- Alan Kay

It seems to me it wasn't so much a "prediction" as a proposal that was then carried out, which I find much more impressive than a prediction. But, either way, you're right he's intimately linked with the concept.

I like many of his stories and novels, too. Have you read The Fountains of Paradise? That deals with the space elevator idea and is quite a good book besides.

I'm not sure what my favorites are but your two are excellent. I also liked Childhood's End from reading it a zillion years ago and just recently was really impressed with The Deep Range. And, of course, there are other good ones.
 

Rosemary Fryth

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Yes I own 'Fountains of Paradise', although have to admit its been decades since I last read it.

Another interesting book he wrote was 'Lost Worlds of 2001' which was a behind-the-scenes account of the making of the film '2001 - A Space Odyssey' as well as Clarke musing on his role.
 

Rosemary Fryth

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Oh and just as an aside, counted up my entire Arthur C. Clarke collection - 21 books in all. I really ought to start re-reading them all again...
 

AE35Unit

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I first got into Clarke when I read 2001 in paperback in the 80s while listening to Beethoven. Never looked back!

Oh and in the movie the crew are seen using tablet devices, and Steve Jobs had the audacity to suggest that Apple corp had the rights to the design! That movie was made in 1968!
 

Vertigo

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I'm very much with you on this Rosemary. I'm by no means exclusively into hard believable SF but I do get an extra buzz from reading stuff based on solid science and I do love ACC's work for exactly that reason.

In case you missed it you might be interested in Ian Sales new venture that he posted on recently (http://www.sffchronicles.co.uk/forum/532813-new-anthlogy-rocket-science.html). Looks very interesting and I think I shall be taking a much closer look when it appears.
 

AE35Unit

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I've always like his massive imagination, and since I've grown up, I've discovered his honeyed narrative voice. A pleasure to read for the prose alone, unlike clunky Asimov and far too witty Heinlein.
Yes he always insisted that his writing should be clear and straightforward. No nonesense. No swearing either, something he shared with Asimov! Now I adored Asimov as a person but a lot of his fiction leaves me cold, not so Clarke although i find his Childhood's End a struggle!
 

JT Griffiths

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...is the believabilty of his novels. They all seem to be based on solid scientific principles. With fantasy I can accept the totally wild and bizarre, however with sci-fi there must be a strong element of 'this could actually happen' running through his books.

Clarke I think was called somewhere a modern day prophet for his accuracy in predicting the creation of satellites, and I think in 'Imperial Earth' I recollect him mentioning a device very similar to our current tablet computers.

My favourite Clarke novels would have to be '2001-A Space Odyssey' and 'Rendezvous with Rama', although I do enjoy reading his short stories.
Yes I too like 2001 and Rendezvous with Rama, but to choose a favourite Clarke story would be very difficult.
 

ParallaxBrew

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I read an interesting article on this recently. The article was about how sci-fi authors predict technology. Really, though, what they are doing is taking an existing technology to its next logical level.
 

BAYLOR

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One of the most forward looking science fiction writers of all time His stories alway seemed ahead of the curb in stye and concept. (y)
 

Bick

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Yes, I like the believability of his novels and plots too, and I have a soft spot for some of his later work that garners less praise in the main. I really liked "The Songs of Distant Earth", for example.

His stories alway seemed ahead of the curb in stye and concept.
Indeed, and also of the curve ;)
 
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He was a scientist too. He even had a patent, for the organization of communication satellites' orbits.
 

Bick

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Having a patent to your name is no indication of merit in and of itself, though, to be fair. I have 8 or 9 patents, but I wouldn't claim it means anything much.
 
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Well, in his case, he simply described how geostationary orbits could be used to build a communication network... which is simply the basis for all telecommunications nowadays. So, if it's a "legit" patent (ie not "this guy discovered it but I patented it before he had a chance to do it himself"), which I think it is, it's a really important and useful patent.

Out of curiosity, what kind of patents do you have ? (y)
 

BAYLOR

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The way he conveys and describes space travel.
 

BrightStar*

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I like that he writes with an easy and lightweight style, it reminds me of Bradbury writings but not so poetical. He also uses wider philosophical themes for his novels, and creates great environment and landscapes. For example the beginning of City and the Stars is a masterpiece. I like how he describes the domed city, and how the city takes care of everything and stuff. Its like he is describing the ultimate utopia but at the same time you know there is something wrong there. I only wish I could write so well.
 

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