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Patrick Rothfuss-The Name Of The Wind-Book one of The King Killer Chronicles

Discussion in 'Patrick Rothfuss' started by Ambriel, May 22, 2010.

  1.  
    Clansman

    Clansman Lochaber Axeman, QC

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    Failing to mention, of course, that the songs played were specifically written for three-stringed guitar. You don't bust a string mid-song, written with six strings in mind, and practiced as such, while playing a six-stringed instrument, and manage to hit all the notes.

    Pure BS on Rothfuss's part, and he even says so. He simply imagined what it was like to play.
     
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    Vertigo

    Vertigo Mad Mountain Man

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    I haven't read the book yet but am planning to. However I wanted to comment on the broken strings bit. Whilst I think it would be difficult to play guitar with two broken strings it would not necessarily be impossible depending on the nature of the music being played.

    The story goes that Paganini deliberately filed his violin strings so they would break on stage:

    However note from Wiki:

    Also of course it depends on whether your lute player is only picking out a melody with only a single string being picked at a time.
     
  3.  
    GreenKidx

    GreenKidx Well-Known Member

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    Hello, I personally enjoyed Name of the Wind. While Kvothe was indeed a "perfect" musician/magician/scholar/craftsmen etc. I still found him intresting. It as often his own perfection that got him into sticky situations. And we must also remeber that he was consciously building his own reputation at the time. So, then if Kvothe is the greatest hero of legend of this time/world how could you expect anything less than a stellar childhood? I also think others have overlooked a subtle point that Rothfuss beat us over the head with. Kvothe once was the greatest man/mage/hero of the age, now he is a broken shell of a man, with little of his former glory. The perfect picture we were shown was to provide a dramatic contrast.

    That being said. Let's also remember, where art is concerned, greatness is a matter of pure opinion. IE- While I moderately enjoyed The Hobbit, I hated the rest of the Rings books. Could not even finish. And I really don't like when I notice the writing in a story at all. I just want to read with out the language being used as a character in and of itself. I know it takes talent and skill to do that, but, it annoys me.
     
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    soulsinging

    soulsinging the dude abides

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    That's an excellent way of putting it. I'll take a great story with pedestrian writing over a good story with amazing writing any day. I think Rothfuss and even Rowling both did this well... the writing is smooth and serves its purpose and doesn't really call attention to itself. But prose fireworks do nothing for me mostly (I'm thinking of every postmodern novel I ever read like Delillo, McCarthy, Franzen, etc, even Kundera). Although oddly enough I love Raymond Chandler who might be culprit number one as far as style of writing being noticeable. Guess the exception proves the rule?
     
  5.  
    Werthead

    Werthead Lemming of Discord

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    Rothfuss has completed The Wise Man's Fear. Final publication date: 1 March 2011.
     
  6.  
    Clansman

    Clansman Lochaber Axeman, QC

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    :eek::eek:

    *Clansman removes the glove from his waist, slaps GreenKidx across the face with it, and throws it to the floor*

    I demand satisfaction. My second will call upon yours.

    I believe that it is customary for the challenged to choose the weapons. Pistols or rapiers?

    Or, you could refuse to pick up the glove, and accept shame and dishonour on you and your progeny for 6 generations. The choice, sir, is yours.

    :D:D:D
     
  7.  
    Ambriel

    Ambriel Active Member

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    WOW I'm amazed that a thread that I started got so much feed back. You guys are awesome. What did everyone think of the second book now that its out. I loved it.
     
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    chongjasmine

    chongjasmine Well-Known Member

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    I have difficulties reading this book. The beginning is kind of boring to me. I cannot read past the first 100 pages of this book.

    But seeing so many recommendations for this book, I may give it another try some day.
     
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    Hilarious Joke

    Hilarious Joke Fool

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    I really liked it. Although I did feel it became kind of like 'The Adventures of Kvothe' for part of it; i.e. it felt a little contrived and episodic if that makes sense.

    BUT I very much enjoyed the university scenes and the book has some of the best moments in the series so far, imho.
     
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    Symphinity

    Symphinity Member

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    I love the story and the character of Kvothe. I did feel that story got a little long in the middle of the book. However, Kvothe's visit to the fae, is also one of the best parts of the entire series so far, and this happens in the middle of that long section. Can't wait for book 3!
     
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    Brian G Turner

    Brian G Turner Writing and reading Staff Member

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    I've started this book, but am immediately put off by chapter 2 - a group of deserters politely rob a lone man, and even leave him with food and money to go away with - despite the fact the point has already been made that food is becoming scarce and the roads dangerous.

    I suspect the intention is to make the scribe appear clever - he had money hidden away in his boot and other places - but it just makes the world utterly convincing to me that a bunch of desperate outlaws will politely half-rob a lone traveller during a time of war.

    EDIT: There's also a character at the start called "Graham". Does no one research the origin of names these days??
     
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    HareBrain

    HareBrain Big Rabbit of Chrons Staff Member

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    To be honest, I doubt many readers do.

    But having now done so, what's the problem with Graham? Surely the author could argue that it stands for a name in his world's language that has an analogous derivation? (Gravel + homestead, apparently.) Tolkien did that a lot, with his hobbit names especially.

    I would have trouble with the name for other reasons, however: it just sounds too much like the name of a modern person you'd get working in a mobile phone shop. Maybe Rothfuss was trying to outdo Donaldson's High Lord Kevin.
     
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    Remedy

    Remedy Eat, Sleep, Write, Repeat

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    I just finished this book... Where has it been all my life!

    Mr Rothfuss makes the mundanities (sure, Remedy, that's a word) of life seem interesting and worth exploring. Sometimes more than the adventures.

    I found it difficult to get into on two previous attempts. But once it hit the first person POV (like others here have said) I was hooked.

    I found myself following Kvothe's purse situation very closely - wanting him to get those precious coins so that he could continue. Money seems to be a big theme, which makes sense from Patrick's eternal-university-student background.

    I did often wonder why Kvothe didn't employ his trouper skills sooner, in Tarbean - singing for his supper and all.
    But it made for tremendous reading when he finally won his pipes.

    I'm looking forward to reading the second book when it arrives. I'll read something else in-between.
     
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    Brian G Turner

    Brian G Turner Writing and reading Staff Member

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    I've just tried re-reading this, but I keep being thrown out by the historical anachronisms. For example, the innkeeper is "pulling pints". And the problem with the name "Graham" is that it's next to a "Jacob" - an old English and Jewish name side by side, without any apparent nod to the huge cultural differences between them.

    I know it sounds petty, but it's like if I read Tolkien and found "Denethor and Kylie went for a drink at the one pub in Gondor that had a pinball machine". It completely throws me out of the story. I am going to try and push on, though, as I feel I need to read this.
     
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    Jo Zebedee

    Jo Zebedee Come away, oh human child - Waters and the Wild

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    I think this might be one where your research is getting in the way of enjoyment. ;) None of this impinged on my enjoyment - I took it as a fantasy world and didn't get hung up on names.
     
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    Boneman

    Boneman Well-Known Member

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    And Graham existed in the 12th Century... possibly derived from the town of Grantham. In the 11th Century, the Domesday Book lists it as both Grantham and Graham (and Granham and Grandham). By our lady hell, Lacobus (latin) or Lakobus (greek) later became Jacob was a Hebrew name,(Ya'aqov) before he became one of the 12 founders of the 12 tribes of Israel. If Granham had been stood next to Ya'aqov, we'd probably never have known...

    Occasionally names do trip me up/annoy me, where they're so complex a construction as to be wildly artificial. But generally, Rothfuss keeps his names short and sweet, so even Kvothe trips past my eyes happily.
     
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    Adam Collins

    Adam Collins Member

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    Read it about six months ago and was blown away with the writing. The story was just a wee bit slow, but what a masterclass! A must read for all aspiring writers.
     
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    Boaz

    Boaz Thaphireth!

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    I read The Name of the Wind back in 2010. Also read The Wise Man's Fear and The Slow Regard of Silent Things. I knew nothing about The Name of the Wind before starting it.

    Ostensibly, it is a coming of age tale... but not in the present tense. The great thing about the story is that it is a memoir of an old man waiting to die. (Of course, Kvothe is probably mid-twenties while telling his story, but he feels that he's experienced enough for three or four lifetimes already.) I think anyone comparing Kvothe's story to Harry Potter's is missing the point that Kvothe has already lived his adolescent adventures whereas Harry is just beginning them. Kvothe's anger has been tempered by time. His successes have scrutinized by historians. His sorrow runs strongly throughout the story. He's learned to show mercy, because he's desperately needed it at times. He no longer sees himself as righteous, as infallible, or as a savior... but he gets very nostalgic when speaking about his friends.

    Kvothe's successes are legendary. He's Jimi Hendrix, Gandalf, Casanova, Robin Hood, Leonardo da Vinci, Cyrano de Bergerac, and Hercules rolled into one. And his failures are tragic... and are more present in his mind than his triumphs. He feels more defined by his failures than successes... His prejudices, his petty jealousies, and above all, his pride have imbued him with a sense of compassion and a wariness to hurt people with his involvement.

    Actually, the story is about Kvothe coming to terms with what he's done. The good, the bad, the beautiful, the ugly, the grace, the judgement, the passion, the politics, the animosity, etc... are all trying to be put into perspective. If the story starts like Harry Potter, then I assume it will end like Druss. I am expecting Kvothe to rally for one final stand against evil...

    Brian's comments regarding names hits home with me. I had to get over GRRM's mishmash of names (Hebrew, Greek, Latin, Celtic, English, German, French, Norse, etc.) for his characters living in Westeros, i.e. medieval England. But hey, even JRRT did not make up all his names.
     
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    Hilarious Joke

    Hilarious Joke Fool

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    The saddest thing about narrator Kvothe is that he doesn't play any music, even though it was so essential to his existence as a young man. Something awful must have happened to have led to that.
     
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    Secher_Nbiw

    Secher_Nbiw Member

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    I kinda get where you are coming from, and were the tale set on Earth, even an alternate one, I might see the point. But it's not. The names maybe familiar to us, but from the story perspective, they will have very different origins from the ones we know. Don't let it spoil a good story! :)
     
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