The Next Lovecraft

  1. J-WO

    J-WO Pretentious Avatar Alert.

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    Rocking the sociology Professor look!
    That's not crazy, JD. Happens all the time with me. But mentioning the phenomena to non-writers always gets me strained smiles and panicked eyes searching for exits.
     
    May 28, 2010
    #41
  2. j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator

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    Yep... very few seem to "get it". Those that do, always grin broadly....
     
    May 28, 2010
    #42
  3. w h pugmire esq

    w h pugmire esq Well-Known Member

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    I linger within ye shadows of Sesqua Valley, dream
    And I love it. It sounds like a "bad" thing, to not be in control of one's work -- but it is a part of the weird magick that comes from being a writer. It's all flowing out of the same brain and psyche -- sometimes it just doesn't happen as one has planned and plotted.
     
    May 28, 2010
    #43
  4. j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator

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    Exactly. That is part of the creative process... and can apply, by the way, to nonfiction and critical writing as well as to fiction or verse (though only in the original version; everything will necessitate some polishing and revision -- most likely, anyway -- and at that point one is in conscious control... which may be why that part is also one of the dullest parts of the process....)

    To tie this in with HPL specifically, this (from his "Notes on Writing Weird Fiction"):

    There are, of course, other steps he goes into, but I think these are partcularly important because they give a good idea of why, for example, Lovecraft's writing still makes such a vivid impression where that of so many of his contemporaries (especially from the pulps) does not: he was never bound by any plan, but let his artistic instincts guide him throughout the process, sometimes requiring numerous versions of a tale (and certainly, if one looks at his manuscripts, requiring an enormous amount of interlineation, alteration of phrasing, elimination, refinement, etc.) as he was led by what seemed the most powerful emotional and imaginative ideas connected to the central conception of the tale.

    And, as Wilum says, that is one of the aspects of writing which is the most fun and enjoyable: being surprised by the work yourself, at which time it really does take on a life of its own....
     
    May 28, 2010
    #44
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