Winds of Dune (Caution! contains series spoilers)

Arwena

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2009
Messages
58
The Winds of Dune, by Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson
This is the latest in the Dune series, which has gotten quite prolific - perhaps a never-ending franchise. Brian, of course, is the son of the late Frank Herbert, writing in association with author Kevin Anderson, equally prolific. This volume is part of a mini-series within a series, describing the activity of some people designed as "heros" of Dune, which all take place between the death-by-going-out-into-the desert of Paul Atreides, the regency of his sister Alia, until Leto II finally takes over by incorporating himself into a sandworm. This volume is devoted to Paul’s childhood friend, Bronso of Ix, who is being hunted by Alia and gang for his blasphemous destruction of the Muad’Dib legend. He does prove to be a real hero. The book includes two flashbacks to Bronso’s relationships with Paul and his mother Jessica., so it’s told in almost equal chunks of present story - flashback - present story - flashback - present story. Personally, I can’t turn down a Dune novel, I have to know how it turns out, though, of course, in the mass of prequels and sequels that now exist, the original Dune still holds the first place as a startling ecological statement. Mr. Herbert and Mr. Anderson still tell a good story. They are not as sharp writers as Frank Herbert was, and maybe there are too many constrictions from the necessity of continuity. Without changing the Dune universe, how do you tell a story that doesn’t at times become trivial detail? The new characters that enter the saga do not seem as clearly drawn as the Frank Herbert originals. I often wonder, too, about Frank Herbert’s religion. You cannot help noticing the parallels with Islam - a desert people - hardened by the harshness of their environment - warriors set free to carry on the jihad and conquer the known universe. Islam, however, was strictly monotheistic and drank deeply from the traditions of Abraham. Frank Herbert’s religion has almost nothing to do with God and is an import into Dune, mostly by the Bene Gesserit, scientific nun- geneticists. They do try to remain faithful to one characteristic of the Frank Herbert novels, their complexity, the "plots-within-plots" intricacies. Jessica has to admit that she "knew that neither Paul’s worst critics not his most ardent admirers fully understood her son .... Muad’Dib’s calling was infinitely complex, his goal too tangled, subtle and long-term for anyone, even her, to comprehend fully." The next volume, Throne of Dune, will undoubtedly deal with the Corrino attempt to reclaim the empire, and Irulan will be the next hero. That is hinted at, none to subtly, in later chapters of the book.
 

Rodders

|-O-| (-O-) |-O-|
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
3,968
Thanks Arwena. I have read a few of these books and to me, they never managed to pin down the feel of Herbert's world or the book itself.

I found the Anderson/Herbert books ideal for the train journey to work, Simple and absorbing enough, but not really a series of books to make you think.
 

Abyssimal

River Crossing
Joined
Dec 11, 2007
Messages
26
Thanks Arwena. I have read a few of these books and to me, they never managed to pin down the feel of Herbert's world or the book itself.

I found the Anderson/Herbert books ideal for the train journey to work, Simple and absorbing enough, but not really a series of books to make you think.
I agree. Their writing style is entirely to simplistic for this era in the Dune Mythos. Writing a prequel to the prequels would be better served I think.
 

Rodders

|-O-| (-O-) |-O-|
Joined
Nov 6, 2008
Messages
3,968
I think they need to let it go for a while. I mean they've released about ten books over the last few years.
 

iansales

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 8, 2006
Messages
3,430
Indeed. Frank Herbert's corpse is spinning so fast in its grave, there's likely to be a major earthquake soon.
 

End of Time

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 3, 2014
Messages
55
This stuff is too stupid, I've read more intricate and better fan-fiction.

Inserting their own creations into the original mythos, and building them up as important to the point of overshadowing the original characters, is the least of the many insults they've hurled at the reader and at Frank Herbert himself.
 
Top