Gentleman Bastard Series. (Caution! Spoilers!)

HoopyFrood

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Spoilers herein. Beware. Really.

Recently did a reread of The Lies of Locke Lamora and Red Seas Under Red Skies. I'd forgotten how enjoyable these books are. I think the thing I really like about this particular series is the setting; I admit I do get a little tired of the medieval type, the king-and-courts setting, that crops often. This Italian-esque world, with its unusual glass structures everywhere, and shady and often bloody goings-on happening all the time in the dark alleyways and rambling streets, is refreshing. After reading these two books recently, even though the sequel does have pirates, I'm inclined to say that I prefer the first. It twists and turns all over the place, has some entirely shocking moments that you just don't expect. I mean, killing off Nazca so abruptly, and then Calo, Galdo and Bug, too! But I really enjoy the ending, when Locke returns to Raven's Rest to try and convince everyone of the Wraithstone in the sculptures. Hilarious.

Anyway, there are a few things that I really want to know (damn this series for being so mysterious and addictive):

- When is the next book going to be released?? I want the Republic of Thieves already! I've looked on Amazon, but it's being secretive...I hear it's supposed to be sometime this year, but does anyone know when?
- More about the elusive Sabetha, of course. Lynch is really drawing this one out!
- More about the Eldren Glass. Being a King fan, I can accept when not everything is explained, but this one time when I really do want to know more about this stuff.
- Locke's real name! The only hint we have about it is when he tells Jean, and Jean says no wonder you wanted to change it (or something along those lines). So it could've been perhaps an important name, or infamous, that Locke was better off without....or it's just an entirely naff name and Locke Lamora just sounds better.
 

soulsinging

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I rather liked the first book, but the second book seemed to inflate the few problems I had with the first rather than correct them. The interludes in book two served almost no purpose and the bad guys were so easily taken by whatever half-hearted tricks Locke pulled that it was unbelievable (the strictest casino in the world brings him to the top level just because he wins a lot? I don't think so). There were many obstacles that seemed thrown in their paths for no reason other than seeing them show off to beat them or pad the page count (the whole interlude on the cliff in book two contributes nothing, and Locke stealing clothes at the end of book one is a hugely pointless waste of page count).

That said, he is a very good writer and so much in this world is utterly fascinating. He also has show-stopping scenes that rival anything else I've read (the eerie atmosphere of their trip into the pirate town, the battle on the pirate ships) and the Elderglass and Bondsmagi offer intriguing mystery. I hope in book three he rights the ship a bit and learns to tighten his plot and make the villians as interesting as Locke and Jean.
 

HoopyFrood

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Yes, the bit with the clothes does go on endlessly -- but then it also shows that sometimes he doesn't always manage to win through first time, I guess. The bit with the cliff is also a little deviating...but very funny, nonetheless! Seeing them hanging at the end of the rope (literally) while someone robs them is an interesting turn of events.

Does Locke get taken up to the top floor to see Requin just because he's winning a lot? I know Selendri comes over and congratulates him on doing so, but the reason he gets taken up to see Requin is because he walks up to Selendri later on and says to her "Madam, I have been cheating!" or something similar.

The beginning pages of the second book really serve to drag you in (especially when you've read the first book and know the relationship between Locke and Jean) but I think when you finally reach that moment later on in the book again, it's explained a little too quickly -- whoops, Locke didn't see the hand signals. Understandable, to a point, particularly as he and Jean have had a few fall-outs in the duration of the book...but still, it feels ever so slightly like a cheat to me, after the drama of the opening scene.

Defintiely looking forward to the third book, though.
 

HoopyFrood

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November, eh? Still a long time to wait, but at least there is a prospective date now.

Thanks, K.
 

JDP

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I thought that tLoLL was the best debut novel I've ever read; it's just a really well crafted, engaging novel. IMO RSURS was not up to the same standard - though, to be honest, I think it would be a pretty tall order to keep writing at this level!

It's perhaps my dubious memory misleading me a bit, but I though RSURS was a considerable amount less piratey than I was originally lead to believe? Or is that rubbish?

Last I heard about the new book was that Lynch had missed his deadline a couple of months ago.
 

Werthead

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The Republic of Thieves is currently planned for release in the UK in April 2010, and in the USA shortly thereafter.

Scott is due to deliver the book any day now, so April 2010 is the earliest possible release date. Any bookshop showing an earlier date is wrong.
 

No One

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The beginning pages of the second book really serve to drag you in (especially when you've read the first book and know the relationship between Locke and Jean) but I think when you finally reach that moment later on in the book again, it's explained a little too quickly -- whoops, Locke didn't see the hand signals. Understandable, to a point, particularly as he and Jean have had a few fall-outs in the duration of the book...but still, it feels ever so slightly like a cheat to me, after the drama of the opening scene.
I can't help but wonder if there's more significance to that moment than was played out. About half way through the first book I did consider the possibility of Jean betraying Locke at some point, as unlikely a notion as that seems, given their close bond.

Who knows, what if there wasn't a hand signal from Jean? Maybe, just for a moment Jean did consider the betrayal and maybe this is something that'll come back to the fore in later books. Or maybe it was just a bit underhanded from Lynch (which would seem to be the case).

Agreed with Soulsinging though, that the clash between the Poison Orchid and Dread Sovereign was a terrific scene and carried the highest point of emotional impact in the story.
 
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