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what are your favorite post-apocalypse books?

Pyar

anticipating destiny
Joined
Feb 4, 2006
Messages
264
Location
New York
Alas Babylon
World War Z
The Stand
Where Late Sweet Birds Sang

These are all wonderful books. Though I have to say The Stand did get a little long winded near the end (it was so long!).
 

Connavar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 1, 2007
Messages
8,411
I Am Legend by Richard Matheson
Damnation Alley by Roger Zelazny
Wolf in Shadow by David Gemmell. A post apocalyptic western/fantasy.
 

AE35Unit

]==[]===O °
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Somewhere near Jupiter...
I'm not sure about books but a film called The Quiet Earth is one of my favourite such movies. I believe it was based on a book/story by an Australian author Greg Harrison.
 

blacknorth

Stuck Inside a Cloud
Joined
Jun 14, 2009
Messages
579
I'm not sure about books but a film called The Quiet Earth is one of my favourite such movies. I believe it was based on a book/story by an Australian author Greg Harrison.
I've seen that film, it's rather good.

One of the more obscure items in the post-apocalypse canon is John Boland's novel White August. It concerns a radio-active snowcloud over the UK during the summer months and then goes to some very Cold War and speculative places to find those responsible. Boland is not a SF writer and is probably most remembered for writing the heist thriller The League of Gentlemen.

White August is one of several novels which deals with a UK only holocaust event - I think the most effective of these is probably Peter Van Greenaway's Graffiti which I'd thoroughly recommend. It was his second UK only apocalypse, the first being his debut novel, The Crucified City. Graffiti is about a Soviet nuclear strike on Britain - the survivors discover the location of the Government's bunker and march there in Aldermaston fashion for a confrontation. The ending is bizarre - you'll either throw the book out the window in disgust or start muttering darkly about censorship, in this case an author censoring his publisher.

It's often a difficult read, but well worth seeking out.
 

dask

dark and stormy knight
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Nov 1, 2008
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3,415
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Pacific Northwest
ALAS BABYLON by Pat Frank
ON THE BEACH by Nevil Shute
Z FOR ZACHARIAH by Robert C. O'Brien
"The Gunslinger" by Stephen King
"Second Variety" by Philip K. Dick
 

Vargev

he who never sleeps.
Joined
May 16, 2009
Messages
141
Has anyone ever heard of the Endworld series by David L. Robbins?

I read some of them a few years back, but couldn't complete the series as i couldnt seem to find the other copies. they are a little short, but in my opinion a great series of books.
 

rai

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2007
Messages
204
I too am a fan of Brin's book; The Postman. Enjoy!
I just read 'The Postman', it was OK but to me it seems fairly tame and watered down. Was a fun read but (IMO) not someting I need to re-read.

I am currently re-reading 'The Stand' will be my 3rd time and love it.. :)
 

weaveworld

~Behold my sparklies!~
Joined
Sep 4, 2005
Messages
577
Location
With Sanityassassin and our cats :)
The Stand by Stephen King
I am Legend by Richard Matheson
The Road by Cormac McCarthy
A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr
The Death of Grass by by John Christopher
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood
 

WizardofOwls

King of Typos
Joined
Dec 17, 2005
Messages
252
Location
Wytheville, VA USA
I dont know if it has been mentioned yet, but right now I am reading Andre Norton's No Night Without Stars, and I must say that I am thouroughly enjoying it. My favorite post apocalyptic books are post nuclear, and have mutants and radiation in them. I know that technically this is science-fantasy. We all know that if there were a nuclear war and there were mutations, the vast majority of mutations would not be good. But I still enjoy this sort of book. Reminds me of one of my favorite role playing games, Gamma World.
 

paranoid marvin

Run VT Erroll!
Joined
Mar 9, 2007
Messages
2,146
The Stand is a great novel - for the first 2/3rds anyway. Not too impressed with the later chapeters.

The Cell is great , but seems...unfinished - not at all like King who seems to bring closure in the vast majority of his novles
 

blacknorth

Stuck Inside a Cloud
Joined
Jun 14, 2009
Messages
579
Another couple which spring to mind:

The Cataclysm by RC Sherriff, originally published as The Hopkins Manuscript - standard Earth-Moon collision written in an archaic style.

Junk Day by Arthur Sellings - interesting, this one, published posthumously, I think - after a nuclear holocaust a non-comformist continues the habit of a lifetime by plotting to overthrow the leader of a survivalist community. Moving book by the under-rated Sellings.

I wonder if Philip Wylie's The Disappearance qualifies?
 

chopper

Steven Poore - Epic Fantasist & SFSF Socialist
Joined
Feb 4, 2005
Messages
2,256
Location
Sheffield, SoYo
hmm. here's one that nobody has mentioned.

Riddley Walker, by Russell Hoban.

written in the vernacular, and pretty tough going. interestingly, it also inspired the song "Widders Dump" on King Swamp's eponymous 1989 album.
 

Rodders

|-O-| (-O-) |-O-|
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I've read it and thought that it was really good. Enjoy.
 

Celtic_Bardbarian

New Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2019
Messages
3
Location
Michigan, USA
I would have to put I am Legend by Richard Matheson in my list. But I'm really surprised that I havent seen the Silo series by Hugh Howey. It doesn't have the same feel as a lot of other post-apocolytic stories, but it is one of the first I think of.
 
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