Bernard Cornwell

chump

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Mar 13, 2005
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84
I'll second that recommendation. The whole series is very good.
 

Erunanion

Lazy student
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Dec 13, 2008
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(Be wary - this is a fan-boy post)

I was lucky enough to meet Bernard Cornwell when he was doing book signings for Sharpe's Fury (not his best, but still an enjoyable romp), something which I never tire of telling anyone who will listen :p I was working at the store he came to first after crossing the Atlantic - 4 hours before - for the tour and, after downing a full bottle of red wine, stood for the best part of an hour and talked to people. It was fantastic; so as well as being a terrific author, he's a nice chap too (who can really drink).

I think Cornwell has influenced me more than any other author - he writes ction better than anyone else I have read, and he consistently writes very enjoyable characters. I have yet to read his American Civil War and King Arthur books, and the few one-off modern-day thrillers based around sailing:)confused:) but aside from that I think I have devoured just about everything else he churned out - I am that much of a fanboy :p

So I will recommend his work to anyone, but particularly anyone who likes great action, entertaining characters, and a clean, simple writing style which certainly appeals to me.


Wyrd bid ful araed, and God save Ireland :D
 

annis

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Nov 19, 2008
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Posted by sloweye
Moved on to 'Fallen Angles' now. took it out thinking it was a stand alone book but it would seem there was a book befor it.
It's actually part of a trilogy which Bernard Cornwell co-wrote with his wife back in the 1980s, under the pseudonym Susannah Kells, though I think the first two have been reprinted since. They go:
1) Crowning Mercy (set during the English Civil War)
2) Fallen Angels ( French Revolution)
3) Coat of Arms aka The Aristocrats (Modern era)
 

chump

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Mar 13, 2005
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84
(

I think Cornwell has influenced me more than any other author - he writes ction better than anyone else I have read, and he consistently writes very enjoyable characters. I have yet to read his American Civil War and King Arthur books, and the few one-off modern-day thrillers based around sailing:)confused:) but aside from that I think I have devoured just about everything else he churned out - I am that much of a fanboy :p
You should really read his King Arthur books as they are definately some of his best books.
 

nj1

monkey is magic
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Nov 28, 2007
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How is Azincourt? I got it brand new in hard cover for 75% off, i couldn't beleive it so i had to take
I think i posted about Azincourt in the 'what Historical Fiction are you reading' thread. It was a solid BC book IMO. Not as good as the Warlord books or the Saxon books, but an enjoyable read, as usual good background, well researched, solid characters and realistic battle scenes.
Enjoy.
 

cornwellforums

New Member
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Jul 21, 2009
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Hi Guys,

I am a great fan of Bernard Cornwell and the Sharpe Series. In response to a few posts here, Azincourt was an excellent read and Bernard did not dissapoint yet again. It compeled me to go and find out more about the battle of Azincourt, (something which Cornwell's books do so often to me). I have decided to set up a forum dedicated to the whole collection of novels from Bernard Cornwell. I hope to inform you all about how the forum does.
 

this charmingm manc

Science fiction fantasy
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Aug 6, 2009
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15
Anyway to answer the orignal post id suggest start with the first written which is sharpes eagle

If that book does not grab you the seies wont, i still think it is one of the better sharpe books.
 
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sielah

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Jul 20, 2006
Messages
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I stopped reading the Sharpe novels after "Sharpe's Tiger". I made the mistake of going to a signing / reading event for the next book after that. Maybe we caught him on a bad night, but Cornwell was an arrogant, rude, patronising turd. It was a very unpleasant evening, and I think he lost a few fans that night, including myself.
 

Clansman

Lochaber Axeman, QC
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The last post notwithstanding, I want to read the Sharpe series to compliment my enjoyment of the naval side of the Napoleonic conflict that I received at the hands of Patrick O'Brian and C.S. Forester.

I do not wish to read Sharpe in publication order, but in order of the stories' chronology (I know, HERESY!). Is there anyone who can assist with a list, in chronological order by story, of the Sharpe novels?
 

chump

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Mar 13, 2005
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84
The last post notwithstanding, I want to read the Sharpe series to compliment my enjoyment of the naval side of the Napoleonic conflict that I received at the hands of Patrick O'Brian and C.S. Forester.

I do not wish to read Sharpe in publication order, but in order of the stories' chronology (I know, HERESY!). Is there anyone who can assist with a list, in chronological order by story, of the Sharpe novels?
Bernard Cornwell - The Author's Official Site - Sharpe Books dot com

Follow the link to find the choronological order as of now but he is still filling in gaps with new books.
 

annis

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Nov 19, 2008
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Not long now- the 5th "Saxon Story" is due out 1 October (in the UK)!

It's called "The Burming Land" and for those who'd like a taster, BC has posted an excerpt on the front page of his website, bernardcornwell.net
 

Cayleb

Elderly book lover.
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Sep 23, 2009
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Having read through this thread I feel I must respond to some of the comments on the various books by Bernard Cornwell. I am not a publicist for the man nor am I anything to do with his publishers, but I am somebody who enjoys and appreciates a good historical novel, well written and historically accurate. His books fill those criteria for me.

Yes, some of them do run pretty slowly on occasion so some people may become bored in reading them. But the pace of any historical novel must, to some extent, reflect the pace of the period being written about and if there were a few years where nothing much happened, then it must be very difficult for an author to generate excitement for his characters during those periods. But, to my mind, this is one of the areas in which Cornwell scores as he is able to maintain the reader’s interest (well, my interest at least) even through such times by introducing period detail about which one would otherwise be unaware.

As for other areas in which he shows his mastery, there are few better authors at writing battle scenes and through his pen I have stood with the Confederate regiments in the cornfield at Sharpsburg, my mouth dry from biting cartridges, wondering if the flood of blue clad figures will ever stop. I have heard the French cannons at Waterloo and known that there can be nothing which might prevent Napoleon’s army from running right over us, unless Blucher comes. Many other places I have, from the comfort of my armchair, come as close as any modern man might to living through the world changing battles of which Mr. Cornwell writes – all because of his genius at describing such events.

No doubt there are bits and pieces of historical criticism which might be aimed at some of his books. This, I think, can probably be said of almost any author of such works, but if there are I am sure they are few and far between and, to be honest, a few small errors of the “but the Fifth Hussars had blue saddle blankets not green ones” really don’t matter to me in the wider interests of telling a jolly good story. I am content to sit back and enjoy it and be thankful that I am able to be sitting back to do so rather than having to be out there, a couple of hundred years ago, (or however long ago it was) doing it.

Those of you who have not yet read his works, I recommend them wholeheartedly and, in the case of the Sharpe series, do start at the chronological beginning, with “Sharpe’s Tiger” and do not concern yourselves with irrelevant questions about why he may have written them in the order he did. Just read and enjoy.

Bernard Cornwell stands very high up on my long list of well-liked authors and, I suspect, I have many, many companions in this view.

For my first post on this forum this is probably long and opinionated enough, but the object of a forum such as this is, I think, to discuss and offer opinions on such matters, so there is my two pennyworth.

I offer my respects and good wishes to all here and I am sure I shall enjoy myself reading your words and perhaps even commenting on other threads.

Cayleb
 

joolzred

thingywhatsit
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Sep 13, 2009
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I've only read the Harlequin series, and quite enjoyed them however as a middle-aged lady (probably not his target readership!) I found the long battle descriptions quite tedious and enjoyed the general storyline and themes much more entertaining.
 

Lacedaemonian

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I am currently wading through the Sharpe series (think there are 24 books) and they are the usual BC fare. As stated by others, these books do not match the staggering quality of the Warlord trilogy. However, BC is a master story teller and you are always thoroughly entertained and educated by his works.

I have read the first eleven books in the last few weeks and I continue to enjoy them. :)
 

Connavar

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Apr 1, 2007
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I'm reading Sharpe's Tiger currently.

I had read the first book in his Merlin,Arthur series and The Last Kingdom. Both books was not good enough reads for me that i didnt finish but Sharpe is well written,great historical detail,a strong,compelling character. So im enjoying it naturally.
 
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