Exodus

  1. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Brilliant, Namorvia, thanks. Love the 'green-orange' windmill. :cool:

    Here are those links in easy-click form. If you or anyone else spots any other everyday green-tech and can be bothered posting it up, I'll do something on it on my green blog (on my website) soon.

    World's 'first' solar-powered mobile phone unveiled | Reg Hardware

    Orange goes green for festival phone-fuelling | Reg Hardware

    Astrolab electro-solar hybrid, designed like a Formule 1 and works with very little energy .html

    Mara could so have done with one of those dinky wind-chargers in her backpack....

    Hi portymatt, welcome to the forum. Hope you enjoy your visits, and also enjoy the book - sounds like you have a great teacher! ;) Say hi from me.
     
  2. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    Those articles are fantastic! I have been using some of them for doing a Situational Analysis in my Environmental Studies class. :p I really like Orange's creation of a wind-powered phone, that would be handy in Scotland!
     
  3. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    Hmm, ok. This pretty much a fake post. My post count is 14 and i need 15 for the links. So the next one is the real one, didn't see much point giving you the [remove the spaces] version so yeah, whatever. It's worth it.
     
  4. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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  5. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    Yay for posting links! :) That article was really cool. Do you guys think that maybe one day it will be completely normal for people to walk around with that on their legs? Oh, who knows what the future holds!
     
  6. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    I have a question for anyone out there willing to give their opinion.
    There is lots of talk about how Global Warming is completely blown up by the media and the government and that human contribution to Global Warming is about 6%. In other words, if human's change the way they live, temperatures will still go up 96% as much as before so it makes little difference.
    Do you believe this? Do you think that if human's change their lifestyle it will make a difference? I'm not entirely sure what to think...
     
  7. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    I'm not sure about the percentages, but the counter argument to "global warming" was always "climate change" i.e. the world has natural cycles of hot and cold, both due to geological cycles and our distance from the sun (gravitational pull of other planets and all sort of things makes us wobble just slightly but it makes a big difference).

    A diagram I saw a couple of years back mapped the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere alongside global temperature and although they couldn't tell whether CO2 raises temperature or temperature raises CO2 there is a link, and we now have lots more CO2 in our atmosphere than their has been in a long time.

    The idea that it's a controlling technique by world governments isn't rediculously far fetched either. The oil is running out but if anyone admitted that then oil prices would skyrocket, the east would become superpowers overnight and the world would grind to a halt. Much smarter to tell everyone that if they don't turn out their lights when they leave the room and support the contructions of wind farms then their grandkids will all drown. I don't really believe all that, but I can understand how people do.

    So basically, I have no idea how responsible humans are for global warming, but if we can stop it we should, and if we can't no one can think ill of us for trying.
     
  8. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    Lol, i just happened to have a lecture on this just a few minutes ago.

    I could probably actually attach all the lecture notes as an attachment but i think someone from the university would probably hunt me down if they found out.

    But I will steal the diagram I mentioned before.
    [​IMG]

    And I'll quote his quotes from the IPCC:
    IPCC 1995 (First Assessment Report)
    "Global warming has occured, and it may be due to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions"
    IPCC 1998 (Second Assessment Report) concluded that:
    "The balance of evidence suggests a discernable human influence on global climate."
    IPCC 2001 (Third Assessment Report) concluded that
    "Most of the observed warming over the last 50 years is likely to have" been due to the increase in greenhouse gas concentrations
    IPCC 2007 (4th Assessment Report) concluded that
    "The arguing is over"
     
  9. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Great posts, Namorvia. I always say, when asked if my 'vision' is true: I've written a story, a once upon a time about the future. It's not a prediction.

    There are no absolutes about climate change; as soon as I read one thing which seems definitive, I find another bunch of scientists who disagree completely. (That graph and conclusions seems pretty definitive but no doubt there's somebody out there who will say they can prove different.)

    So what I think is: we don't know. But the evidence seems to be piling up. I agree that governments have all kinds of vested interests in turning us 'greener' and as Namorvia says, and not all completely altruistic.

    But even if we don't know absolutely, I'd like to live in a less polluted world. So 'green' seems to make sense as an insurance policy and as a better way to progress. If climate change is nothing to do with us then at least we've developed a less polluting way to live on the planet (the world population explosion and diminishing resources are no myths). And do we really want to take the chance of doing nothing? Just seems a pretty big risk.... what do you think?
     
  10. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    I agree. I think that even if our actions do not actually prevent global warming, it is nicer to be cleaner. Take care of our planet in any way we can. And also, I hate to waste things, and the diminishing resources problem is getting a bit crazy. I often think that one day we may end up all living like Mara (cut off from the world through diminshed resources, no energy, no transport etc.) even if we are not surrounded by water.
    I suppose the diminishing resources is also due to the population growth. But then there are countries who are worried because their population is declining, and I don't understand why some think it's good and some think it's bad. Although, I feel guilty because I am one of those kids from a big family who wants a big family... so I do nothing to help the growing population :(
     
  11. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Retrospective serendipity?

    Proof that real life is at least as strange as fiction?

    Reading the following article in today's Independent newspaper (UK), I had the most unnerving sense of deja vu. It's tells of the floating villages of Chong Khneas, 'one of the great spectacles of Cambodia' and the deadly threat of pollution and climate change to their precarious watery existence. I was well aware of 'boat people' in various parts of the world when I wrote about the refugee boat camp outside the sky city walls in EXODUS and imagined Tuck's floating pirate city in Zenith, but I didn't research, I imagined how it might be possible to live in such a way, if that were the only way to survive. And here, in the real world, is how they do.

    A poisoned paradise: water water everywhere - Asia, World - Independent.co.uk

    What really shocked me was that my imagined sea urchins, like Wing, who paddle through the floodwaters in junk vessels like car doors and washtubs exist here and now, as water babies and bucket gangs, in our world.

    And they shouldn't.

    See here:
    Tonle Sap an introduction to Cambodia's great lake
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2008
  12. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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  13. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Lots of questions by email. One that keeps coming up is how did I get the idea for the Noos - the mind-blowing cyberuniverse of the future in Exodus; it wasn't so much part of the story in Zenith but it's key to Fox's story in Aurora.

    In the meanderings and detours that I always do when writing (or when I should be writing but it's hard to get the ideas flowing when staring at a blank screen), I discovered trails of beautiful images that echoed each other. A map of internet connections, 'flu viruses, galaxies of all kinds (real and synthetic), even strangely beautiful tumours.... and so my idea of the Noos developed from images like these.
     
  14. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    The one on the left, that's the internet one? What exactly is it showing. Looks amazing.

    Ever since reading Exodus I have wanted to experience the Weave. Its just an intoxicating idea that you could have the vastness of compiled in a visual form that you could zip through as fast as your brain could handle, with the data forming buildings and then cities. That might just be me though, the woman that assessed me recently to see if I was dyslexic said she got the impression I was far more interested in the cyber world than the real one.
     
  15. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    The image on the left (in my post above) is a 'map' of internet connections.
    The middle one is a 'synthetic' (computer-created) galaxy.
    The one on the right is a 'flu virus.

    What's fascinating is the way the internet mirrors our brain patterns, as if we are recreating an image of our own brains - a vast explosion of human consciousness, for good and bad - in cyberspace. So that might explain your fascination, Namorvia.

    The writer William Gibson invented the term cyberspace and visualised the internet before it came to be, in his 1984 novel Neuromancer - I too loved the idea of cyberspace as a 3-D experience with data formed into a vast 'city'. So I just took it a stage further and imagined it as a ruined city abandoned in cyberspace by a lost world....

    The image on the left (below) is of blogosphere connections:

    "The visual study featured here by Matthew Hurst reflects a plot of the most active and interconnected parts of the blogosphere from collected link data over a period of six weeks. Green links represent one-way links (that is, blog A links to blog B), and blue links indicate reciprocal links (blog B returns the favor).

    1 - On the map, white dots represent individual blogs, sized according to number of links. This one in particular represents DailyKos which is visited by 500,000 people every day.
    2 - The popular site Boingboing, a "Directory of Wonderful Things".
    3 - LiveJournal users (an isolated, close-knit online community of bloggers).
    4 - The blue blob represents a balanced sociopolitical discourse (most links are reciprocal).
    5 - An outlying island of blue represents the linked-up world of bloggers who traffic in the latest news and gossip from the world of pornography.
    6 - A group of sports enthusiasts in the outskirts, many of whom, unlike the lonely pornographers, have links back to the central hot spot of the blogosphere."

    And the image on the right (below) represents the electronic connections of the human brain: Technology Review: A Working Brain Model


    Google Image Result for http://www.brown.edu/Research/dichtung-digital/2004/1/Ryan/ryan-space_files/image002.jpg

    Stunning!
     
  16. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    The first one you posted on the left, that is EXACTLY how I imagined the Noos (except blank whiteness instead of dark blackness)

    Those pictures are amazing!! It's incredible the activity we can see in a diagram that normally would never have been seen by a human eye! Technology... I am just waiting for them to come out with a Cyberwizz like Mara's.

    By the way, isn't it tomorrow that Exodus comes out in the United States???!!! Julie, are you doing anything special? Is there anything going on? I can't wait to see Exodus on the shelves!
     
  17. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Thanks, woolleywrld - I'm so touched that you remembered!! Rather pathetically, I had to sing a chorus of "Happy Publication Day To Me" at breakfast-time before anyone in this house remembered... but I am promised a nice celebratory meal tonight.

    April 1st as Publication Day seemed a bit ominous. I just dropped in on the US Amazon to check it's not an April Fool, but Exodus is definitely on sale, as of now. The response from reviewers has been amazingly good - but it's early days and people have all sorts of views about books, so you never know. What one person loves, another will hate. I just hold my breath and cross my fingers. (Which does make it difficult to type, I confess.)

    I'm just about to do a blog post on the website on what's been happening.

    I do plan to visit the USA in the not too distant future - but not today. I planned something really special for today, writing-wise. I will now sit up and assume bold type for a grand announcement:

    Today I am writing the end of AURORA.

    It gives me a tingly feeling to be writing the end of the story on the very day the beginning of the story comes out in America. It feels good.

    The bad news is that there's a big bit in the middle still to be written. Sorry. But the ending is giving me goosebumps and a very big lump in my throat. That's a good sign, (I think!)

    So... here I go. Wish me luck.
     
  18. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    I thought I'd put up a celebratory pic. The spectacular one I wanted was too big to upload. But these flying penguins are pretty spectacular too. ;)
     
  19. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    That was the first thing I saw when I came to the page and it made me soooo happy!! That is really exciting! :) And only what? ...two years until we all get to read it!!! :p

    To be honest, I have had the publication date for Exodus in the U.S. down as an alarm in my phone since you last told me. I think it's safe to say that I was looking forward to it. I am so excited that it is out here finally! I am going to Barnes and Noble this weekend to get my copy! So, do you know where in the U.S. you would be visiting? Mulitple locations?

    That celebratory picture is amazing. At first glance it looked like there were drops of water on the lense of the camera! It's incredible to see that they are penguins flying through the air. :p
     
  20. Mark Robson

    Mark Robson Dragon Writer

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    LOL! Wish I'd seen this on April 1st. Great picture, Julie. :D
     
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