Exodus

  1. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    Now that is just mental!!! Novels in a text message??? That completly defeats the purpose of reading! It's kind of cool that they are coming up with new ways of getting people to read "novels" but i guess you can't really call that a novel. It must be a completely new kind of media. It seems almost like a soap opera in text form. Cliff hangers and the like, haha. Oh well, whatever floats your boat I guess. But yes you're right, I prefer to be able to hold the book, fold the pages, etc. Cal me old fashioned but I think I'll stick with my paper rather than my phone. :rolleyes:
     
  2. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Fantastic images, 73.

    I didn't know about the slave urchins. My own urchins in Exodus and Zenith were a take on the South American 'sewer urchins.' Sadly, real life is often more surreal and cruel than anything you could invent in fiction.

    Here's another sea/ sky city image from among my hoard. There's another that I prefer but it was too big a file to upload. You can have a look on: http://solarvoyager.com/uploads/JanL/future_city_scene.jpg

    303198332_adc2b6b2c1_o.jpg


    Must dig out a few images I found that are very close to how I envisage the Noos (the New World's cyber-universe).
     
  3. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    I hadn't seen 73's pictures yet, those are amazing! The Dubai Towers...totally New Mungo!! That almost exactly matches how I saw them too! That is amazing.

    Something else in the books that I have been thinking more about recently (actually I am writing a paper in my Sociology class and I am including Exodus and Zenith in my paper) is the socialisation of these kids in the future. The norms and beliefs they have based on how the world has changed. I love thinking about what could have changed or what may have been forgotten to make the people of Pomperoy worship the Man in the Middle (AKA Colonel Sanders!!). Or how Mara could have never heard of Mcdonalds or Irn-bru. They all have different values and even different knowledge of what kids today have. (This is a rare moment where I am truly excited about writing a paper! :)) Anyone notice any other little things in the socialisation of these kids in the future?
     
  4. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    Does anyone remember the film water world (i'm guessing there was a book which preceded it, but i've never looked), it was basically mad max on sea but it invisioned a world where the polar icecaps had melted and the world was flooded. Dirt was seen as an extremely valuable comodity because it could be used to grow food and also because it suggested that there might still be land somewhere out there. I tried briefly to find a picture of their floating villages and towns but I can't find one, they looked a bit like forts.

    Another issue brought up recently in my lectures (I'm studying ecology) was kelp growth, i can't remember the exact figures and i can't find the notes that said it but they were comparing the gowth of kelp to terrestrial agricultural crops. The kelp grow fast because it would only take one large storm to destroy them, i think it was mentioned that in terms of forces a 5mph current under water would be the equivilent of a 25mph wind on land, so the kelp are under much greater forces, more likely to break so they need to grow and reproduce faster making them a much more useful crop providing we would all be willing to start eating it. That's not really a new idea though, its mentioned in Omen 2 and Soilent Green, in both its used to feed an overpopulated world and i think noos food is made of it isn't it (just dolled up to look like real food)

    If my post seem scattered by the way i currently don't have a computer or the internet at my house so i'm only online in the library, yay!
     
  5. Mary Hoffman

    Mary Hoffman Writer

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    I belong to the "other SAS" - Scattered Authors So
    The collective name for all three books is His Dark Materials. The Golden Compass is the American title of Northern Lights and hence for the film, otherwise it wouldn't get distributed in the US.

    I don't know why your thread has been invaded by Philip Pullman, though, Julie.

    Mary
     
  6. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    So, the movie is over only the first book after all? I thought it was all three and that's why they came up with a whole new name (The Golden Compass). I did not realise that this was the name for the first book in the U.S. Why do Americans feel they must do that? Change the name to make it their own? For example, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone, it just causes more confusion. I sure hope that Exodus stays Exodus when it comes out over here next year, I can not wait!
     
  7. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    What could they rename it as? Probably something lame like Sky Cities or The Drowned World.

    I think the renaming was something to do with a mix up with the publishers, but i can't remember what the exact mix up was. Renaming HP: Sorcerer's Stone was silly but at least they didn't change the name for the film.

    I doubt it is the american people who actually want these names to change, its just the perceived opinion of the publishers. Like the old ethos that children were incapable of understanding adult concepts and so all their stories should be happy and simple, not that they always were, but that was how many people thought they should be, or at least expected them to be, which was why adults reading Harry Potter on the tube was a big deal.
    Even JK Rowling is known as JK because the someone (presumably the publishers) didn't think that boys would want to read a book writen by a woman.

    Ok, just to put the focus back to Exodus, what were peoples reactions when they first picked up the book? I personally wasn't impressed so I put it back down again, it was only when I was next in the shop without a book to take on holiday with me did I consider it again and decided to get it. I think the blurb sounded quite fantasyish, and I was fantasyed out at the time.
     
  8. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    That's interesting, Namorvia. What kind of blurb would have made you pick up the book first time? Or was it the cover? When Exodus was published the publishers thought they had two big problems:

    - catastrophic climate change was, barely five years ago, still very much seen as a fantasy scenario and that was the angle they took

    - the books are cross-gender and, though not marketed as crossover, have proved to be so. Publishers are much more at home targetting a clear male/ female audience. And a specific age group.

    Once the book went out into the world and did its own thing, which is the wonderful thing that books can do, those 'problems' came to be strengths.

    You are spot on about publishers and film people making patronising decisions on behalf of audiences - going for bland and simple instead of complex and risky. A small example recently is my US publishers making the 999 emergency number Mara dials (in the phonebox after the storm surge on Wing) 911 - but Mara is not American and all they had to do was omit the number. As woolleywrld says, why do Americans have to do that? But it was the publishers, not the people.

    woolleywrld, it will be Exodus, Zenith then Aurora in US, as here. I almost didn't get to keep Zenith in the UK as the word was 'too difficult and unknown' and 'reeked of sci-fi'! :eek: Before anyone shouts at me here, that was a publisher's view, not mine. I read so widely that labels are meaningless, just get in the way, for me. A book should go out into the world and find its own place, not be boxed in by a label. I know labels make it easier to find a book, but they are also barriers and keep you from books you might love.

    Hi Mary, I'm a big fan of Mr Pullman so it's fine by me if he pops up here, in whatever form ;) Can;t wait for the film. Also want to see Neil Gaiman's Stardust. It's an odd and beguiling little book, which kind of niggled me because I wanted it to be more than it was. That's a back-handed compliment. So for once the film may improve on the book. (Back to Namorvia - I suspect Waterworld wasn't based on a book because the film's big problem was: amazing idea, but no story).

    I almost had to do a TV slot for a Channel 5 documentary on Neil and the film but it was very last minute and I was booked to do something else so I managed to enjoy myself in London instead of facing my personal terror - a TV camera. Why does anyone want to be on TV? Doing TV is horrible. Give me a hall full of rowdy teenagers any day (http://blogs.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/10/how_to_engage_teenage_readers.html)

    (That was a bit rambling and off-topic...sorry. Must be coffee time.)
     
  9. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    Haha, loved the blog thingy. Actually laughed out loud, which isn't wise in a silent computer lab.

    Why can't (didn't) the american publishers just keep the 999, pretty much everyone in the world knows their emergency number what with all the countless tv shows with people screaming "Call 911" etc etc. Doesn't help the countries reputation for being oblivious of the rest of the world when the most simple of cultural references is removed. In the context what she's doing with the telephone then surely your average, bright young reader will put two and two together and will not only understand the passage but actually learn something in the process.

    I always found that the worst thing about being a child was not being understood, and that the worst thing about being an adult (so far) is that people both expect to be able to understand you and for you to understand them.

    I'll get back to you about what I first thought of the blurb after the weekend, I'll need to read it again and I don't have the book at uni, but I'm back home this weekend and I've got someone I want to lend it to so I'll re-read it and see if I can rememeber what I thought.

    Stardust does look good, I may have to hunt out the book sometime but I've never heard of it before. I quite expected the latest Harry Potter film to be better than the book, but alas, and the last two were getting quite good I thought.

    Waterworld was quite a fun film, if entirely pointless, but who says sitting in front of your telly for 2-3 hours should be thought provoking. I'm a fan of most films even if they're no good.
     
  10. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    They did actually release two different versions of the Philosopher's Stone film. Theyreleased one in which they actually say Sorceror any time that Philosopher is mentioned! It would have caused a lot less bother if they had just left it alone! (To be honest, I quite liked the last film, I think the director did a good job in editing it down. But the film is never going to be as good as the books, that verrrrry rarely happens!)
    That is true that it is the publishers, not the people that change things. Like the 999 to 911. But still, why? Like Namorvia said, they would learn a little something new! AND (I repeat), it would cause less bother.
    I did see the film Stardust, it's fantastic! It has a bit of everything, comedy, action, romance. I never knew it was based on a book though, I would love to read it.
    I also enjoyed the blog, it was funny. I have heard people say before that it's easier to talk to kids than adults. Which audience do you think is more critical of your work? I also liked your other blog, and the responses from everyone! There was a lot. I hope that when Exodus comes out over here it will be a big deal, I hope it really makes people think. I will totally do my part to try to help it be a big deal, word of mouth does wonders...
     
  11. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    We haven't had a pic for a while so here are some pics of where I am (imaginatively): up in a storm-blasted steeple with Fox about, ooh, 108 years from now....You can probably see why, in Exodus, Mara calls it the great wizard hat.

    View attachment 15384


    And here is the turreted building where Mara's face is in the stone. (And it really is - I found her there.)

    View attachment 15386

    Woolleywrld:
    Talking to children, teens and adults is all very different, I find. Adults are more polite and well-behaved (occasionally you get a mad, ranting one!) while young audiences are definitely harder work - but if you win over a young audience you get far, far more back. You can really feel the 'click' of connection as you talk. But you have to earn it... :)

    Please do spread the word - there's nothing more powerful than someone saying, you just have to read this!

    Neil Gaiman is a great storyteller and I loved Stardust as a graphic novel, but felt it was a little underworked and disjointed as a novel. The film seemed to build on the graphic novel beautifully. I loved the idea of Waterworld and enjoyed the first half, then got bored because they seemed to have forgotten to have a story amid all that sea.

    So I will get on with my story and return to the tower and see what Fox and Pandora are up to....
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2007
  12. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    There a good debate on climate change on another part of this site.

    If you want to drop in, go to the top of this page and click on the red Science Fiction Fantasy Chronicles Forum link then look down at the bottom of the main page to the Discussion section and you'll find the Science/Nature forum where people are Arguing That Global Warming Exists.

    :( Is it true or just a lot of hot air?
     
  13. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    For readers of Exodus and Zenith:

    Great images of Dubai in the fog the other day, looking very much like a sky city. And a pic of 'Global Warming Island' which has been discovered under the melting ice at the top of the world....
     
  14. DeLune

    DeLune New Member

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    Hello everyone! Just felt the need to join and voice my opinion as i've just finished Exodus (must be about the 4th time i've read it!) and i forgot how much i love this book! Last time i read it must of been a few years ago!
    I was so unbelivably excited when i found out about Zenith (bout half an hour ago!) and have promptly ordered of t'internet. It will be with me by Wednesday- yayness!!!!!

    I don't want to read too much into the forum at this point incase there are any spoilers for Zenith!
     
  15. woolleywrld

    woolleywrld Noosrunner

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    I love all the pictures you are sharing with us on here, Julie. It reinforces the pictures I have in my imagination already. But I don't really know Glasgow all that well, so it's always nice for some reminders! :) And did you really find Mara's face in the stone? Did you base her apearance on the statue, or was it complete coincidence that her face really is there?
    I am currently ordering multiple copies of Exodus from my brother in Scotland to give away as Christmas presents over here. I am definitely making sure the word gets out before the book does!!! I cannot wait until it's out over here. Exodus comes out in April '08, right?
     
  16. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    It may just be the computer I'm using but I'd like you all to try typing the word "afforestation" into Word and seeing if it recognizes it. Kind of worrying that mine doesn't. Have to wonder about society, I accept that when I type "Cnidaria" or something its likely not to know it, but "afforestation" really isn't that obscure a word.

    (And incase your wondering I'm writing an essay on the implications of Mangrove deforestation in Indonesia)
     
  17. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    Exodus is published on April 1st 2008 in the US, woolleywrld. There are haunting stone faces all over the old buildings of Glasgow, a few of them are said to be Thenew, also known as St. Enoch, the mother of the city's founder, St. Mungo, according to legend - the same legend that Mara discovers in Exodus. Wandering round Kelvingrove museum and art galleries one day I became fascinated by the statues, each one symbolic of a different element of the city - one girl holds a book, another a boat, and so on. And one of those faces just held me.

    It's hard to get a photo as this particular statue sits in an awkward high place but I'll try, and if I can get a decent image I'll post it here.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2007
  18. Julie Bertagna

    Julie Bertagna author

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    The Christmas card here (see EarthSpace) is for Namorvia, re the afforestation post above.

    Wishing all the Chroniclers a fun and happy Christmas! A SPARK GAP
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2007
  19. Namorvia

    Namorvia Noosrunner pro

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    [wont let me post links till after my 15th post (grr) so copy and paste them into the adress bar, stick the www on and delete the spaces]

    Just been doing a bit of research on solar power, which is probably my favourite sort since it works so well for trees. Basically it comes down to me wanting a Cyberwizz and wanting to charge my batteries like Mara can so... reghardware .co.uk/2007/06/18/hitech_solar_phone/
    bit pricey, but what isn't when its new. Also reghardware .co.uk/2007/06/14/orange_prototypes_wind_phone_charger/
    just because, it was linked to in the first article and because the guy that wrote it has my name :D

    There also seems to be quite a few solar powered car battery chargers on amazon too so I'm guessing (though I couldn't find them (i didn't look very hard)) they do them for normal household stuff too.

    venturi.fr/electric-vehicules-astrolab-concept .html

    The problem with solar powered cars is not that they're slow (this one isn't apparently, but then its a hybrid), or that they run out of power if you live somewhere that doesn't get any sun. Its the fact that they're incredibly ugly. It's good to know they have research going into stuff like this.
     
  20. portymatt

    portymatt New Member

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    Hi! My reading group at school is just starting to read 'Exodus'. My teacher is really enthusiastic about it and has told us what a great book it is, so I'm really looking forward to reading it. I like that it is set in Glasgow, because I live in Edinburgh and have visited Glasgow. My teacher asked me to find out about you and to see if I could even get in touch with you, so I was really pleased when I saw the link to this forum. :)
     
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