Hobb's characters

Chrischa

New Member
Joined
May 9, 2005
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4
I've recently finished reading a fantasy book in which the main character is tortured to the point of breaking his will, by somebody who's entire life was dedicated to studying torture. Indeed he behaves like a broken slave afterwards.
But then, by explanation of a simple magic trick, he regains his personality and the rest of the book carries on as if nothing happened.

This annoyed me to no end and made me wish that Robin Hobb would come in and teach this writer a lesson or two!

One thing I tremendously like about her books is the psychology behind the characters. Fitz is beaten to death in Regal's dungeons, and afterwards he has subtly changed. Serilla in the Liveships books is raped, and she becomes what is described as an empty shell. So is Kennit.

It's all brilliantly done and I dare say that she can portrait people like no other writer I know; every character in her books carries the weight of his/her past with them and Hobb brings them to life like no-one else.
 

Talysia

Lady of Autumn
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Oct 26, 2006
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4,981
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Lincolnshire, UK
I agree. The characters in her novels do seem to be truly deep, with a history that is carried with them as she writes. Very few authors can get that sense of past to stay with their characters.
 

Rahl Windsong

Last of the Windsong Clan
Joined
Mar 15, 2005
Messages
642
Location
Squamish, BC, Canada
Yes definetly, her characters grow right along with whatever happens to them in her stories, brilliant characters!

Here is a quote from George RR Martin about the quality of Hobb's characters and her writing in general. This came from him reading "The Golden Fool"

Quote: "Robin Hobb (Bantam Spectra, 2003). I'm a big Robin Hobb fan, as I've confessed before. I think she's doing some of the best stuff in contemporary fantasy... and I'm bloody envious of how fast she writes. GOLDEN FOOL is the second volume in her current "Tawny Man" trilogy. It picks up right where FOOL'S ERRAND left off and never looks back. This one also brings some Bingtown Traders to the Six Duchies, tying Hobb's two previous trilogies (the "Assassin" and "Liveship" series) together in some interesting ways. As ever, it's a page turner, well crafted and full of vivid writing and finely-drawn characters. I'm already looking forward to the next one."
 

Kitera

Dreamer ~
Joined
Dec 20, 2006
Messages
261
I've recently finished reading a fantasy book in which the main character is tortured to the point of breaking his will, by somebody who's entire life was dedicated to studying torture. Indeed he behaves like a broken slave afterwards.
But then, by explanation of a simple magic trick, he regains his personality and the rest of the book carries on as if nothing happened.

This annoyed me to no end and made me wish that Robin Hobb would come in and teach this writer a lesson or two!

One thing I tremendously like about her books is the psychology behind the characters. Fitz is beaten to death in Regal's dungeons, and afterwards he has subtly changed. Serilla in the Liveships books is raped, and she becomes what is described as an empty shell. So is Kennit.

It's all brilliantly done and I dare say that she can portrait people like no other writer I know; every character in her books carries the weight of his/her past with them and Hobb brings them to life like no-one else.

That's why she is my favourite author! :p
 

sassy1

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2007
Messages
149
I've recently finished reading a fantasy book in which the main character is tortured to the point of breaking his will, by somebody who's entire life was dedicated to studying torture. Indeed he behaves like a broken slave afterwards.
But then, by explanation of a simple magic trick, he regains his personality and the rest of the book carries on as if nothing happened.
Hahahaha i was trying to work out which RObin Hobb book that was... until i read further on anyway haha


But i agree that Robin Hobb writes about her characters in such a way that they are so believable. There are reasons in the characters' pasts that help to explain why they are the way they are, and the story changes them as it goes along, making them different people than they were when the story started.

I really hate books where there are some poor people who get thrust into war or whatever, then at the end when peace comes round again, everything goes back to how it was. cant think of any examples at the mo, but i know there are a few books i have read that are just like that. none of which were written by Robin Hobb, obviously :p
 
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