Why the Federation/Starfleet is a totalitarian regime

Whitestar

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#1
When Gene Roddenberry attempted to spread his “tree hugging” New Age philosophy for Next Gen, he wanted to create a government that respected and cherished the differences in its people, especially when encountering extra terrestrials. While the Federation/Starfleet initially appeared to be a benevolent government, there's a lot of evidence to suggest otherwise. In fact, it's a totalitarian regime and here are some examples.

During the initial development of Next Gen, Roddenberry sought to incorporate a ship counselor stationed on the bridge because he wanted the role of the counselor to help the crew adjust to life onboard a starship in deep space. This is understandable, but another reason for this was because at the time the show was made, therapy was the latest fad, it was considered cool and hip. Thus, the character of counselor Deanna Troi was born. Plus, he wanted the character to have empathic abilities, for he felt that she (and probably every Betazoid) would make ideal candidates as spies for Starfleet Captains, using the ship counselor title as cover. Don’t believe me? Well, let’s examine the episode entitled, “The Loss” for instance. In that episode, Troi loses her empathic abilities, albeit temporarily, and becomes angry and hostile towards her shipmates. To makes things even more dramatic, she threatens to quit her job as ship counselor because she felt that she could no longer perform her duty. The question is, why would she do that? Didn’t she bragged in nearly every episode that she has a degree in psychology? Even if she lost her empathic powers permanently, that doesn’t mean that she was incapable of performing as ship counselor because she’s a trained psychologist, or least, she keeps reminding us of that misleading impression. So what does this so-called “professional ship counselor” do? She complains, whines, and cries like a little spoil brat, rather than adjusting to this “handicap” as a mature adult and move on. But in typical Star Trek fashion, Troi miraciously gets her empathic powers back and everything is the same as before, as though the episode in question never happened. It would have been far more interesting if Troi had lost her empathic powers permanently and seek guidance from other professional counselors, who do not possess her former abilities and do their job very well without it. Plus, the crew would have felt more at ease than having Troi poking around in their minds!

The universal translator is another example of the Federation/Starfleet totalitarian mentality. The way it is depicted in Star Trek, this device is capable of deciphering an unknown language whenever the Enterprise crew encounters a new species for the first time. But what’s really stretching plausibility is that it does so instantaneously. The problem with this plot device is that it takes time to understand an unknown language. To get an idea of what that’s like, try watching a foreign film without subtitles in it and figure out what the characters are saying, and I guarantee you that you will not understand anything. Although it helps to figure out what the characters are emoting, judging by their voice intonation and body movement, its not enough for you to fully comprehend what’s happening in that particular scene if you don’t know the lingo. The only exception to this rule is the Next Gen episode entitled, “Darmok”, which highlights how rocky communication can become when words are shared, but not concepts. Which leads to a terrifying prospect: the universal translator operates by scanning the minds of alien beings, thus, breaching a code of ethics in terms of privacy. It scans, reads, and interprets the unknown language accordingly. If that is the case, why the frell does Starfleet need beings like Troi or telepaths in the first place? If it is so good at reading minds, we can forgo all the courtroom dramatics and equipment crises in Star Trek. And since it can read minds effectively, it is also an ideal focusing device for starship control panels. There goes half the episodes! I’m surprised that Troi never once felt that her job was threatened by the universal translator. If Starfleet had any brains, they would have fire her eema the moment the universal translator was invented, and I wouldn’t have minded one bit because I hated her character anyway. No doubt, this technology is something that the Borg would wilt before it. Speaking of which, it amazes me on how the Federation goes so far as to advertise all over the known galaxy on how evil the Borg are, with their plans for assimilating all intelligent life into their collective hive. At least the Borg are upfront about their objectives, but the same cannot be said of the Federation/Starfleet, who uses the universal translator as a mind scanning device, cloaked in the form of extra terrestrial brotherly love and understanding.

And the ultimate abomination is the transporter. This device has so many problems in Star Trek that I don’t understand why the writers insist on using it, plot convenience aside. When Roddenberry realized that he couldn’t land the Enterprise or a shutlecraft on a planet every week due to budget constraints, he had to figure out another creative way to get Captain Kirk and his crew from the Enterprise to a planet. Thus, he invented the transporter (well, not really, he stole it from the classic film, “The Fly”). Very convenient. Not only did it solved the budgetary problems of its time, it also removed the necessity of landing starships onto a planet, which would have been time consuming at best, boring at worse. Anyway, let’s examine for a moment on how it functions. Based on the writers description, it works by separating crew members at the atomic level, which is then converted into energy and sent through a matter stream. Once the energy arrives at the appointed destination, the process is reversed. Sounds neat. Too bad it doesn’t work as a means for transportation and I’ll explain why. The transporter cannot separate crew members atoms due to the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, which states that one can measure an atom’s position and velocity with great precision, but never both at the same time. To measure one, cancels out the other. A good analogy to this the heads-or-tails scenerio. When you flip a coin, you can either have heads or tails, but not both. Same thing goes for the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. Plus, it also converts crew members into energy, which is Einstein’s most famous formula, E=mc2. To convert a 50 kilogram person into energy, the energy equivalent would be somewhere in excess of a thousand 1 megaton hydrogen bombs! If we were to take that energy and reconvert back into matter, it would result in a clone, thinking that he or she is the original person. Thus, the transporter is actually a form of capital punishment as oppose to the ultimate transportation device. Some claim that the Empire in Star Wars is ruthless, but at least they don’t subject them to the horrors of the transporter by willingly destroying themselves as raw fuel, only to be cloned! Besides, if they wanted to get inside a captured ship, all they have to do blast their way through the doors. Crude, but effective. Roddenberry should have placed more careful thought in creating a teleportation device that displaces its occupants, like a wormhole or hyperspace, rather than destroying and cloning his characters.

The absurd part about all this is that this is coming from Roddenberry himself, who said from the beginning of the original series that he would never allow Starfleet vessels to be equip with cloaking devices because the Federation/Starfleet are not spies, and yet he fully endorsed Troi (and possibly other Betazoids) as pseudo-ship counselors to read (and invade) the minds of every people or being they come into contact, without their consent and he has the gall to state that the Federation/Starfleet are not sneaks?!? Like hell they’re not! The Federation is a totalitarian regime who does not care for its citizens well-being. It must be overthrown and replaced with a more benign government (if there is such a thing).
 
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Dave

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#3
Whitestar said:
The Federation is a totalitarian regime who does not care for its citizens well-being. It must be overthrown and replaced with a more benign government (if there is such a thing).
Oh Yeah! You and who's army. Tha's fightin' talk!

Seriously, I agree with everything you said (and I've read it before too), except that much of that later development was beyond Roddenberry's original concept.

What about the 'Prime Directive'? That doesn't strike me as the ideology of a Totalitarian regime. It doesn't work though. Star Fleet Captains break the 'Prime Directive' on more occasions than they mention it. Kirk and Janeway break it everyday before breakfast!

I much prefer Iain M Bank's idea of the 'Culture'; a regime that constantly interferes and tinkers with other societies to set them back upon what they deem to be the right path. Much more like our own Governments do today.

Have you ever seen this website?:
The Fascist Ideology of Star Trek: Militarism, Collectivism, & Atheism
 

Whitestar

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#4
Dave said:
Oh Yeah! You and who's army. Tha's fightin' talk!
LOL! Actually, there's a LOT of people who feel the same as I do, you'd be surprised. :)

Dave said:
Seriously, I agree with everything you said (and I've read it before too), except that much of that later development was beyond Roddenberry's original concept.

What about the 'Prime Directive'? That doesn't strike me as the ideology of a Totalitarian regime. It doesn't work though. Star Fleet Captains break the 'Prime Directive' on more occasions than they mention it. Kirk and Janeway break it everyday before breakfast!

I much prefer Iain M Bank's idea of the 'Culture'; a regime that constantly interferes and tinkers with other societies to set them back upon what they deem to be the right path. Much more like our own Governments do today.
Yes, you're quite right about the Prime Directive. While I don't particularly like the character of Kirk, I do however, agree with him disobeying it whenever it suited him because its a very unattainable ideal. Not only is it easy to violate the Prime Directive; in fact, it is hard NOT to violate it. Now if Starfleet actually followed the Prime Directive to the letter, they wouldn't achieve their objectives which involves from tentative exploration to outright colonization, and that alone is a violation of the Prime Directive. In addition, its also a scientific impossibility. For instance, we know that behind the Prime Directive is the idea that it is possible to observe a society without actually affecting it. Based on this observation, the Prime Directive is a direct violation of the aforementioned Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, which again states that observers always interfere with the things they're observing. Just like in the beginning of the movie, "Insurrection" (which by the way was originally called, "Prime Directive") Starfleet is spying on the Baku village people through a cloaked observation dome (sneaky, aren't they?). No observation is or can be neutral. You can't have it both ways and neither can Star Trek. Whether the Federation/Starfleet likes it or not, observers are indeed participants. Even Picard who was more strict in adhering to this principle had violated the Prime Directive at least nine times in his career and everytime he had a good damn reason for doing so. Ditto for Kirk. Thus, violating the Prime Directive is not really a matter of principle but of degree. I addressed this in my thread entitled, "Prime Directive: Why it should be abolished" on the following link:

http://www.chronicles-network.com/forum/11065-the-prime-directive-why-it-should-be-abolished.html

The problem is, historically speaking, there is no such thing as exploration for exploration's sake. Exploration usually leads to empire, and empire leads to war. Roddenberry was aware of exploration being a poor excuse for conquest and empire, hence, he created the Prime Directive because he wanted the Federation to as a corrective to this bloody history of exploration. Some consider Christopher Columbus a hero, but I don't because he deliberately killed innocent men, women, and children. Anyone who commits this type of atrocity is a coward and a criminal in my book, and he was both. Its no wonder he always considered himself a failure till the day he died. But getting back to the subject at hand, I think that maybe the Prime Directive should not be abolished, but remodified. It should state that the Federation/Starfleet's mission is to explore strange new worlds and civilizations and whenever they encounter new species that are a spacefaring society, they can establish commerce and trade, thus, forming alliances and allies. They should do this even with the primitive worlds as well because they will appreciate getting their technology jump-started by a thousand fold and will no doubt have something of value to the Federation/Starfleet too. Its a win-win situation, I think.

Yes, I came across that link a few years back and its a very good one. :)
 

Whitestar

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#6
Here is another example of why the Federation/Starfleet is a totalitarian regime. During the DS9 era, the war between the Federation and the Cardassia ended when both factions signed an armistice, consisting of the Federation surrendering colony planets which originally belonged to Cardassia. The problem was that there were many Federation officers and citizens who were living on these colony planets and refused to leave. However, the Federation has offered them to relocate elsewhere under Federation rule, but the Maquis's loyalties lied more with their homes colonies, as opposed to the Federation. The moment the armistice was signed, Maquis felt the Federation had abandoned them, leaving the impression that the Federation was a totalitarian regime. Faced with no other alternative, the Maquis began to rebel against the Cardassian government by attacking their ships, outposts, and militarized zones. The Maquis generally tended to avoid attacking Federation ships, advising them to get out of the way instead. In response to these attacks, the Federation and Cardassia has labeled the Maquis as terrorists and both have pursued them relentlessly ever since. However, there were many within the Federation who considered the Maquis heroes and sympathized with their cause.

In the DS9 episode entitled, "For The Cause", paints the Federation in a very unflattering light when former Starfleet officer, Michael Eddington has become a member of the Maquis and provides a very convincing argument on why the Federation/Starfleet is a totalitarian regime:

"Why is the Federation so obsessed about the Maquis? We've never harmed you. And yet we're constantly arrested and charged with terrorism, starships chase us through the Badlands, and our supporters are harassed and ridiculed. Why? Because we've left the Federation, and that's the one thing you can't accept. Nobody leaves paradise. Everyone should want to be in the Federation. Hell, you even want the Cardassians to join. You're only sending them replicators so that one day they can take their 'rightful place' on the Federation Council. You know, in some ways you're worse than the Borg. At least they tell you about their plans for assimilation. You're more insidious. You assimilate people and they don't even know it."

See link for more information:

United Federation of Planets - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Unfortunately, the Dominion eventually anniliated the Maquis, except the ones stationed on board Voyager, the last surviving remnants when they were stationed in the Delta Quadrant at the time. It should also be noted that its not actually known if the Federation/Starfleet actually forces other species to join them, considering how hard it is to apply for membership and many are turned down. But they certainly give that impression. For those wishing for a new Trek show with a cool premise, I got one for you: the Rebirth of the Maquis!
 
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Trek Fan

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#7
I just had to register to speak out against this madness. These are the rantings of an insane man. The Federation gives people the choice whether to join or not, perhaps you would be happier roaming around as a Borg drone, because that's what would happen if the Federation were not there to stop such threats. Oh and citing technology without any relation to what you are talking about as some sort of justification for your delusions just proves what an insane ****** you are.
 

Teresa Edgerton

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#8
If you just registered, you won't have had time to forget our rules against personal attacks. In the future, please stick to attacking the argument, not the individual, or your time with us may be brief.

Although, as it happens, in this case you are addressing your remarks to someone who hasn't posted in this thread in six years or been seen on these forums for months, so you may end up talking to yourself.
 

kshRox

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#9
I just had to register to speak out against this madness. These are the rantings of an insane man. The Federation gives people the choice whether to join or not, perhaps you would be happier roaming around as a Borg drone, because that's what would happen if the Federation were not there to stop such threats. Oh and citing technology without any relation to what you are talking about as some sort of justification for your delusions just proves what an insane ****** you are.
Wow! Lighten up.
I love the original Star Trek series and the reboot with Chris Pine.
At the same time though I also love the way the movie Galaxy Quest gently pokes fun at us and the series while simultaneously paying homage.

Somewhere in the 80's people behind the franchise started taking themselves way too seriously and squeezed all the fun out of it.

Hopefully the reboot will take us back to a more tongue in cheek presentation where valid social issues can be digested along with the entertainment rather than force fed to us like a lecture by a pretentious professor.

I'm just sayin' :)
 

Dave

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#10
The problem with Trek Fans personal attack on Whitestar is that he produced no argument against what he had said, except that Starfleet's use of technology has nothing to do with it and that planets are given a choice to join the Federation or not.

The kind of technology that is employed and advanced is a reflection on a society's morals. I can think of several areas today where some countries allow certain technologies and other have banned them. I'm not saying that I agree with banning technological progress, only that it happens.

Giving planets a choice to join the UFP is all very well if they had a choice. As he points out himself, the choice is often one as stark as membership versus becoming Borg dones. This is not a choice.
 

Dozmonic

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#11
It's difficult to refute wild and completely unsupported claims. Trek Fan was pretty spot on, except for his needless final couple of words :)

Troi's powers are a part of her life and of course she'll struggle once she loses them, as much as you or I would struggle losing our sight or sound if our job relied on it. This doesn't make her a spy, that is a ridiculous conclusion. A musician who loses the power of sight and suddenly has to play from memory, which they can, will struggle but it doesn't make them a spy. That's the level of logic linking going on throughout here.

The same can be said of the universal translator. It translates communication attempts. It does not read minds, with all the layers of subtlety and intent, and extract full meaning from them. If this were the case, no aliens would be capable of lying through it. Troi has no fears of the translator because 1) she isn't a spy and 2) it doesn't work as claimed.

The flaws of the transporter technology have been apparent to anybody who's thought about where consciousness resides and what it actually is. But it's a plot device, plain and simple. A writer's tool. Poetic licence.
 

Abernovo

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#12
If that is what you believe, Trek Fan, then how about a reasoned, polite argument opposing Whitestar's assertion? Polite debate is welcomed.

As to the Federation, it's a fictional entity, so nobody can truly be for or against it.
 

The Ace

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#13
Remember, both sides considered the Maquis to be criminals ( largely because they had the potential to re-ignite the hostilities neither side wanted) . Which is better, a couple of years in New Zealand or a show trial followed by a death sentence ?

Having read that last sentence, I'll get back to you later.:rolleyes:
 

Whitestar

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#14
I just had to register to speak out against this madness. These are the rantings of an insane man. The Federation gives people the choice whether to join or not, perhaps you would be happier roaming around as a Borg drone, because that's what would happen if the Federation were not there to stop such threats. Oh and citing technology without any relation to what you are talking about as some sort of justification for your delusions just proves what an insane ****** you are.
:LOL: Oh wow! I had no idea that this thread was still going on after all these years, considering that I’ve subscribed to it and yet, I never received any notifications. It was just by chance that I was surfing around the site today and found it, weird. Also, it has been a while since I’ve posted on this wonderful forum, but I have been very busy lately.

Anyway, Trek Fan, you may find this surprising, but I am amused by your comment. Obviously, I struck a nerve and quite honestly, I am flattered by your response because you seem to care about what I have to say! :LOL: While your disagreement on my view in regards to Star Trek is appreciated, your hostility towards me is not. First of all, you don’t even know me. Second of all, if you have read my previous posts on other threads, you will have noticed that I always treat every member on this forum with dignity and respect. Therefore, I refuse to stoop down to your low level childish mindset, consisting of tactless remarks and an ill-mannered demeanor. I have no problem with you disagreeing with me on my views on Star Trek, but there is no need for belligerence. I would imagine that you are of adult age, so grow up and act like one!

Now, having said that, Star Trek fans are supposedly renowned for their liberal philosophy of accepting various and different opinions, and viewpoints on all things that deal with the human condition such as race, religion, and politics, etc. However, when it comes to criticizing the low-points of Star Trek itself, not all fans, but a great portion of them will go off the deep end. Granted, no tv show is perfect and people have the right to point out the pros as well as the cons too because it makes for interesting discussion, besides, it’s only a tv show for goodness sake! :rolleyes:

Recall the philosophy of I.D.I.C. which stands for Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations, which basically means there is room for all kinds of opinions and viewpoints. If you claim to be a Star Trek fan (as your username suggests), you would not be responding in the manner you did. I should point out that this is not the first time I have encountered a tense situation like this with other fans in the past. People like you have proven to me (as well as everybody here) that you are not a true Star Trek fan simply because you are inflexible and intractable of accepting other peoples’ opinions that differ from your own.

While it is quite clear you disagree with my assessment on Star Trek, you have not made any effort to challenge me on the subject. If you have a problem with my differing views on it, please elaborate, in fact, I look forward with great interest. Prove me wrong (or not), hell, I might even believe you.

Should you decide to respond, it’s possible that even after reading your follow-ups (that is, if you choose to respond after all these years), I still may not agree with your opinion, but I am willing to disagree in a civilized fashion, I hope you are too! :)

Wow! Lighten up.
Agreed! :)
 
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Brian G Turner

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#15
Apologies about that, @Whitestar - that sort of comment would not normally have remained. It's a few years old, however, so I suspect I was more bemused than anything by the reply, and probably wondered if it was a joke. :)
 

Whitestar

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#16
Apologies about that, @Whitestar - that sort of comment would not normally have remained. It's a few years old, however, so I suspect I was more bemused than anything by the reply, and probably wondered if it was a joke. :)
Hi Brian! :) Well, that was certainly not my impression. He was quite clear in terms of his unwarranted hostility towards me. The man should lighten up! :)
 

WaylanderToo

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#17
... and our supporters are harassed and ridiculed. Why? Because we've left the Federation, and that's the one thing you can't accept. Nobody leaves paradise. Everyone should want to be in the Federation. Hell, you even want the Cardassians to join. You're only sending them replicators so that one day they can take their 'rightful place' on the Federation Council. You know, in some ways you're worse than the Borg. At least they tell you about their plans for assimilation. You're more insidious. You assimilate people and they don't even know it."
A amusingly enough Brexiters (and I suspect, though for different reasons, Scottish Nats) know how it feels lmao.


Back on topic - really enjoyed that thread, thanks (y)
 

Frost Giant

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#18
Wow, a lot of analysis and strong feelings here for a TV show. While I certainly admit there are flaws in the concept and writing of the show, perhaps a more rational response is called for. Right now we appear to have the two extremes in this thread. Since I have a little time to kill and I happen to enjoy some Trek from time to time, I'll plunk in my two cents....
As has been stated earlier in the thread, planets are indeed given a choice whether or not they wish to join the Federation. Worlds in places dominated by the Romulans or Klingons don't get to choose. The elected representatives of the Federation Council vote when they make a decision, the Federation isn't run by a single leader or an elite group.
Starfleet has always been a shown as a military organization, just like America has the US Navy. Sometimes the Enterprise is protecting a world by fighting an enemy, sometimes they are explorers, sometimes they are rendering aid. Just like ships of the US Navy have fought enemies (Battle of Midway), helped in exploration (USS Hornet recovered Apollo Astronauts, for example) and rendered assistance (in 2007 USS Ronald Reagan rendered aid to a crippled cruise ship, saving at least one life). Starfleet and the US Navy are very similar and while neither one of them is perfect, I wouldn't consider them evil.

Troi is hardly a master spy. The one time she acted as such (on the Romulan warbird, disguised as a Romulan) she had to be abducted and forced into it.
For her to regularly act in that capacity one of her main duties would be to warn Captain Picard that the ship in front of them is about to fire. I can't think of a single time she said "that seemingly harmless ship is preparing to fire on us!" She always seems as surprised as anyone when the Enterprise is hit by incoming fire. In my opinion, attempting to kill over a thousand people would elicit a pretty noticeable emotional change in a typical enemy commander. Even if she was a spy (which I don't think she is intended to be) - that would be good. It's not like every government on Earth today doesn't use intelligence operatives. In my opinion every starship should have a ship's telepath (not an empath) stationed on the bridge. It would help protect the ship and make first contact encounters easier.
The loss of her powers made only one real difference that she was apparently too stupid to grasp - it's the difference between asking the shrink go-to question of "how does that make you feel?" versus simply knowing how the patient feels. As for your general depiction of Troi being a lame character, I agree. In my opinion her best role was in the episode Power Play.

If we had to wait in real time for the several months (or longer) the Universal Translator might take to process new languages, well, that would be a pretty boring TV show. Darmok was a good episode, but to have every episode be that way would be somewhat tedious and the point is to entertain.
Starfleet doesn't use cloaking technology on starships because they agreed not to in the Treaty of Algeron. While it's not used in ships, we've seen them use it on the ground - in Who Watches The Watchers the Federation scientists hide behind a holographic "duck blind."

The Transporters overcome the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle by using Heisenberg Compensators, as explained in the show. In TOS they talked about converting matter into energy and back into matter again. In TNG they explain it as the body being converted into "kiloquads of data", so there may be a refinement in the explanation there that deals with the amount of energy produced as well as the probable death of the original person who "arrives" at their destination as a copy. That being said, I agree that the transporter is one of the least plausible technologies postulated on the show. However, the fact that the Transporter occupies such a huge grey area is a gold mine for a story teller. The machine in question has allowed them to write some pretty fanciful Twilight Zone type scripts.

Lastly, and I believe this might be of great help to you, there is a portion of the Mystery Science Theater 3000 theme song that may address your original post in general and soothe your nerves:
If you're wondering how he eats and breathes
And other science facts,
Just repeat to yourself "It's just a show,
I should really just relax...."
 

Whitestar

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#19
A amusingly enough Brexiters (and I suspect, though for different reasons, Scottish Nats) know how it feels lmao.


Back on topic - really enjoyed that thread, thanks (y)
Glad you enjoyed it! :)


Wow, a lot of analysis and strong feelings here for a TV show.
Thank you! :)

While I certainly admit there are flaws in the concept and writing of the show, perhaps a more rational response is called for. Right now we appear to have the two extremes in this thread. Since I have a little time to kill and I happen to enjoy some Trek from time to time, I'll plunk in my two cents....
As has been stated earlier in the thread, planets are indeed given a choice whether or not they wish to join the Federation. Worlds in places dominated by the Romulans or Klingons don't get to choose. The elected representatives of the Federation Council vote when they make a decision, the Federation isn't run by a single leader or an elite group.
Starfleet has always been a shown as a military organization, just like America has the US Navy. Sometimes the Enterprise is protecting a world by fighting an enemy, sometimes they are explorers, sometimes they are rendering aid. Just like ships of the US Navy have fought enemies (Battle of Midway), helped in exploration (USS Hornet recovered Apollo Astronauts, for example) and rendered assistance (in 2007 USS Ronald Reagan rendered aid to a crippled cruise ship, saving at least one life). Starfleet and the US Navy are very similar and while neither one of them is perfect, I wouldn't consider them evil.
Agreed. :D

Troi is hardly a master spy. The one time she acted as such (on the Romulan warbird, disguised as a Romulan) she had to be abducted and forced into it.
Yes, I remember that episode and it was a good one too. (y)

For her to regularly act in that capacity one of her main duties would be to warn Captain Picard that the ship in front of them is about to fire. I can't think of a single time she said "that seemingly harmless ship is preparing to fire on us!" She always seems as surprised as anyone when the Enterprise is hit by incoming fire. In my opinion, attempting to kill over a thousand people would elicit a pretty noticeable emotional change in a typical enemy commander. Even if she was a spy (which I don't think she is intended to be) - that would be good. It's not like every government on Earth today doesn't use intelligence operatives. In my opinion every starship should have a ship's telepath (not an empath) stationed on the bridge. It would help protect the ship and make first contact encounters easier.
Once again, I agree, but if Starfleet is going to employ telepaths on their ships, then it is a considered a form of covertness. :sneaky:

The loss of her powers made only one real difference that she was apparently too stupid to grasp - it's the difference between asking the shrink go-to question of "how does that make you feel?" versus simply knowing how the patient feels.
Indeed, but the fact that she quit her job as a psychologist simply because of the loss of her telepathic powers is a poor excuse! That means that all the training she's had to become a psychologist was for nothing! :LOL:

As for your general depiction of Troi being a lame character, I agree. In my opinion her best role was in the episode Power Play.
Ditto! (y)

If we had to wait in real time for the several months (or longer) the Universal Translator might take to process new languages, well, that would be a pretty boring TV show. Darmok was a good episode, but to have every episode be that way would be somewhat tedious and the point is to entertain.
Yes, it's purpose foremost is to entertain, but the communication barrier between two different species is still a problem that even modern audiences are quick to point out. Instead, as an alternative, it would be much easier for the sake of storytelling to have the alien races encountered by the Enterprise (as well as other Federation starships) as established contacts in which their languages have already been deciphered and downloaded into their computer memory banks, and develop the stories that showcase trade and commerce a la Dune. Personally, I think it makes for a far more interesting premise. But then again, I don't own Star Trek! :whistle:

Starfleet doesn't use cloaking technology on starships because they agreed not to in the Treaty of Algeron. While it's not used in ships, we've seen them use it on the ground - in Who Watches The Watchers the Federation scientists hide behind a holographic "duck blind."
Yes, this just shows how hypocritical Starfleet is! :LOL: Gene Roddenberry did not want Starfleet to incorporate cloaking devices on their ships because he said they were not sneaks and yet, he incorporates telepaths to get inside the minds of their adversaries! Talk about inconsistent! (n) If that is the case, then he should have had Starfleet ships equipped with cloaking devices because both cloaking devices and telepaths offer great tactical advantages, they are both different types of covert tactics, but they are covert in nature nonetheless. ;)

The Transporters overcome the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle by using Heisenberg Compensators, as explained in the show. In TOS they talked about converting matter into energy and back into matter again. In TNG they explain it as the body being converted into "kiloquads of data", so there may be a refinement in the explanation there that deals with the amount of energy produced as well as the probable death of the original person who "arrives" at their destination as a copy. That being said, I agree that the transporter is one of the least plausible technologies postulated on the show. However, the fact that the Transporter occupies such a huge grey area is a gold mine for a story teller. The machine in question has allowed them to write some pretty fanciful Twilight Zone type scripts.
LOL! Michael Okuda, graphic designer who designed the computer graphics interface for TNG consoles once said he was asked by a fan on how the Heisenberg Compensators worked and he said, "Very well, thank you!" :ROFLMAO: When it comes to most sci-fi shows and movies, you have to suspend disbelief to an extent. However, if we are to accept how the transporters could work in real life, then no, it would not actually be transportation, but more like a sophisticated atom bomb! :eek:

Lastly, and I believe this might be of great help to you, there is a portion of the Mystery Science Theater 3000 theme song that may address your original post in general and soothe your nerves:
If you're wondering how he eats and breathes
And other science facts,
Just repeat to yourself "It's just a show,
I should really just relax...."
That show is hilarious! :cool:
 
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Khuratokh

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#20
Glad you enjoyed it! :)




Thank you! :)



Agreed. :D



Yes, I remember that episode and it was a good one too. (y)



Once again, I agree, but if Starfleet is going to employ telepaths on their ships, then it is a considered a form of covertness. :sneaky:



Indeed, but the fact that she quit her job as a psychologist simply because of the loss of her telepathic powers is a poor excuse! That means that all the training she's had to become a psychologist was for nothing! :LOL:



Ditto! (y)



Yes, it's purpose foremost is to entertain, but the communication barrier between two different species is still a problem that even modern audiences are quick to point out. Instead, as an alternative, it would be much easier for the sake of storytelling to have the alien races encountered by the Enterprise (as well as other Federation starships) as established contacts in which their languages have already been deciphered and downloaded into their computer memory banks, and develop the stories that showcase trade and commerce a la Dune. Personally, I think it makes for a far more interesting premise. But then again, I don't own Star Trek! :whistle:



Yes, this just shows how hypocritical Starfleet is! :LOL: Gene Roddenberry did not want Starfleet to incorporate cloaking devices on their ships because he said they were not sneaks and yet, he incorporates telepaths to get inside the minds of their adversaries! Talk about inconsistent! (n) If that is the case, then he should have had Starfleet ships equipped with cloaking devices because both cloaking devices and telepaths offer great tactical advantages, they are both different types of covert tactics, but they are covert in nature nonetheless. ;)



LOL! Michael Okuda, graphic designer who designed the computer graphics interface for TNG consoles once said he was asked by a fan on how the Heisenberg Compensators worked and he said, "Very well, thank you!" :ROFLMAO: When it comes to most sci-fi shows and movies, you have to suspend disbelief to an extent. However, if we are to accept how the transporters could work in real life, then no, it would not actually be transportation, but more like a sophisticated atom bomb! :eek:



That show is hilarious! :cool:
Similarly one of the okudagrams reveal the warpcore is powered by hamster wheel.
 

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