Night Watch

Brian G Turner

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***** SPOILERS!!! *****






Read this - really enjoyed it up to the point where Vimes orders the blackade, but then hear that the crowd have moved it up a street.

After then, the story - so far pivoted upon the cunning and wit of Vimes - suddenly seems to turn into a farce with no real story - just stand around and stuff happens with meaningless silliness.

I felt cheated at the end, too - to neither see nor experience John Keel's death (as Vimes) was very unsatisfactory and seemed to denigrate the whole lilac experience.

When Vimes got back seemed rushed, too - just "Vimes went here, Vimes went there, oh look he's in the nuddy!" but I didn't find that funny.

I guess if I were to say that a book looked rushed towards the end I'd say this was one - enojyed immensely the Thief of Time and Going Postal, but this one seemed to peter out.

Anyone agree with me?
 

Thadlerian

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I personally think Night Watch is the best Discworld book, at least in the "adult" DW vein. I like the way it brutally strips away the fluff that inevitably seems to be a part of DW books: A lot of people die here, but contrary to ordinary DW deaths, they're non-humorous, and those who die are good guys.

I've read it twice this far, but I can't say I've noticed any shift in the quality at any particular point. I can however imagine that as the riot expands, the story shifts away from Vimes's cunning because there's less he can do about the situation. He's no superman, after all.

We didn't see Keel die, but I feel the lilac concept was justified anyway, because so much other bad stuff happened that day.

But then again, the ending might just as well be rushed. Pratchett's endings repeatedly bother me. They're just too nice, there's no permanent harm done to anyone, and everything's back to before.

Still, Night Watch was nearly pure pleasure to read. I felt the surfacing of a refined kind of Pratchett there: A serious Pratchett writing serious books about things he cares for. I think Discworld could stand well on its own without having to support itself on comedy; it's a more complex Fantasy world than most others. It treats those major themes that other writers won't even touch: Ethnic identity and nationalism.

EDIT: By the way, I watched a Norwegian adaption of Les Misérables yesterday, and I felt I recognized lots of stuff from NW :D
 

Green

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I agree with Thad on this one. NW was one of my favourite DW books and I enjoyed it from cover to cover. It had a grittiness that many of the books lack, and all the better for it. Not a Rincewind in sight :)
 

MARKLS21

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Hiya guys,i've just bought 'Night Watch',off e-bay,i've read a great many Discworld novels,my favourite being Ankh-Mor-Pork,and especially city watch books,and so i'm really looking forward to reading it and posting my opinion,right after i've finished reading my new Wilbur Smith,Da Vinci code,and latest Stephen Donaldson novels.
 

ray gower

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Read this - really enjoyed it up to the point where Vimes orders the blackade, but then hear that the crowd have moved it up a street.
Rather made the whole story real for me. People are like that when they get big ideas and they don't wait for the 'brains' of the operation.

Though I would agree it is not the best of the DW stories, or even the Vimes stories.
 

Bup

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NW was alright. For me, what has always made the DW books attractive is the way they can present what is absurd and sad in life and make you smile - together with a wit few can compete with.

NW was more cynical than what I was used to, but still rather good.Monstrous Regiment was even more cynical, but in this book the plot didn't like me, and I didn't like it, for two clams worth. 'Going Postal' was again alright.

It just seems as if though Terry Pratchett has always seen both the humour and darkness of life, the absurdness and what is comical; but lately he sees mostly darkness.
 

Thadlerian

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I might add that NW is one of the few Fantasy stories I've read in which the "ordinary" people function as an actor in the main conflict, rather than just a homogenous, bothersome mass of victims that needs rescuing.

Way to go, Terry!
 

alicebandassassin

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nw was great as you got to understand what made some of are fave watch caractors how or what in noddys case what they are!
 

bookaholic

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I found N.W really good. O.K it might be rushed at the end but it's such a good book I don't mind at all!
 

The Ace

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No, Vimes was chasing a cop-killer, the book was dark because Vimes was trapped in his own nightmare. I loved the end, when he handed Carcer over rather than (as most of us would do) sticking a knife between his ribs.
 

Sibeling

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I've just finished it, and I absolutely loved every page of the book! :D

It had some humour, and it was nice to see the old familiar characters in the way they have never been described before. Dibbler's first pie, and Reg Shoe still among the living, how cool is that :)

And it was a very dark and intense story- Vimes, just a person like everyone else, is suddenly responsible for the outcome of the rebellion and has to fight against that psycho Carcer. I was so worried about Vimes, I really felt like the story is real, I could not put the book down because I was afraid the events might go on without me reading them...

The part when they go to the headquarters of the Unmentionables, all that dry blood and teeth on the floor - yuck! The ending was a bit rushed, but it was a happy end :)
 

Steffi

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I loved Night Watch, very down to earth and gritty......happy endings are always good.
 

Joel007

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No, Vimes was chasing a cop-killer, the book was dark because Vimes was trapped in his own nightmare. I loved the end, when he handed Carcer over rather than (as most of us would do) sticking a knife between his ribs.
I really liked the way Vetinari just fit in perfectly. Such a great character. He was watching all along... makes you wonder if the sound that alerted Vimes came from vetinari?
 

bruno-1012

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Thought the scene at the Unmentionables was quite important in setting up the older Vimes's cynicism.

This was through seeing the effects of his actions as the young Vimes in delivering people there and then realising what had happened to them.

Also Vimes doing the necessary to relieve the suffering of those who were beyond saving - very dark.

The point with the lilac was what the young Vimes had experienced in that week. It also started to explain why he started drinking. Still not sure how he became captain....plus the books still haven't fully explained where he got his education (translating the motto's on the crests for example)
 

Sibeling

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Lilac was pretty symbolic - I liked the way an ordinary flower became meaningful for the people involved.

I wondered about Vimes' future life, as well. I mean, Vimes as Keel made some positive changes in the Watch, so shouldn't the organisation develop in a good way? However, in Guards!Guards! the Watch is just 3 people and most of them are no good for any kind of job..
 

DarkBunni

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Night Watch Rocked the metaphorical Kasba! XD Loved young vetinari.
the dog bother bit makes me laugh everytime, if only Downey knew...lol
 
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