HP Lovecraft

  1. GOLLUM

    GOLLUM Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree that was an interesting post, nice to have another member on board cognizant about authors from previous generations YEH!....:)
     
    Mar 17, 2006
    #21
  2. Mors Profundis

    Mors Profundis Active Member

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    I read dead people.
    Many of the old classics that have been little more than rumors for quite a while are back in print, simply because they've come out of copyright.
    Do try to read Crawford, now I must fly, the Society to Abolish the Worship of Rhan-Tegoth will be here any moment, and it's my turn to make the chamomile tea and put out the ladyfingers-ta-ta!
     
    Mar 18, 2006
    #22
  3. GOLLUM

    GOLLUM Moderator Staff Member

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    AH I assume you refer to Francis Marion Crawford Sir?...:D

    Read Mr. Isaacs, The Witch Of Prague, GreifenStein and The Children Of The King. As per your last post Project Gutenberg has a good selection of his stories in the public domain.
     
    Mar 18, 2006
    #23
  4. Mors Profundis

    Mors Profundis Active Member

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    Oh, Goody!
    I've been looking for more of Crawford.

    Whoever told you that Machen and Bierce were inferior to Poe spoke with forked tongue(was it Ashlee Simpson, she has one).

    Bierce was a cynic, and a cad-he probably shot off his mouth in Mexico, and somebody plugged him, he was never noted for good manners.

    Machen had a gift for the oblique approach to a story-like the "White People", the diary(The Green Book) found long after the fact, nothing to be done now, folks, shame what happened.

    Disturbing.

    Today, King and Straub carry these traditions on, building on the good work of the old masters-don't despise them because they sell well and are still alive, they're great craftsmen.

    Oops, gotta go, the Shining Trapazohedron is glowing, wonder what they want now?

    Busy, busy, busy!
     
    Mar 18, 2006
    #24
  5. GOLLUM

    GOLLUM Moderator Staff Member

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    Mors Profundis, do yourself a favour and check out author Thomas Ligotti's work, along with Poe and Lovecraft the best of the Genre IMHO.
     
    Mar 18, 2006
    #25
  6. Mors Profundis

    Mors Profundis Active Member

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    Been there, done that, loved it!
     
    Mar 19, 2006
    #26
  7. GOLLUM

    GOLLUM Moderator Staff Member

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    AH a true afficianado of the Genre I see....:D
     
    Mar 20, 2006
    #27
  8. Brian G Turner

    Brian G Turner He's a very naughty boy! Staff Member

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    Wasn't too happy with the Arthur Machen I read - a little aimless. Maybe I picked up a bad batch of short stories?
     
    Mar 20, 2006
    #28
  9. Mors Profundis

    Mors Profundis Active Member

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    That was his style-episodic and confused.
    It often worked.
    He was greatly admired by Aleister Crowley, but Machen didn't admire him back.
    William Seabrook was a cannibal, pass it on !!!
     
    Mar 20, 2006
    #29
  10. j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator

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    Okay, I simply have to jump in here with my two cents' worth:

    First, it is wonderful to come across some people who are into intelligent discussions on such a topic -- even the ones I disagree with sound refreshing! I hope I contribute something as worthwhile.

    Now, a few general comments on the prior posts: Machen was concerned with "illuminating ecstacy", which makes his stories often rather confused and pointless as far as plot goes (not to mention heavily loaded with extreme coincidence); but his use of the language and ability to convey a subtle drifting from the "common reality" into another realm where spirit rather than flesh really was the important thing (he maintained an almost medieval Church view on the topic) is definitely hard to surpass. He's subtle -- at his best -- but if one reads him in a receptive mood, he can weave quite a spell.

    Good to see Crawford mentioned, his "Wandering Ghosts" has recently been reprinted here in the U.S. with additional material left out of the original edition. I'd still say "The Upper Berth" is among his finest, even if it has been overanthologized.

    There are some facts coming out about Bierce that rather challenge the standard view; some recent bios and collections of much of his long-neglected writings (essays and such, not fiction) are starting to change the image of "Bitter Bierce" to some degree. But it probably is correct he died in Mexico in 1914 -- if he got near enough, he probably broke his cane over Villa's head; he didn't have much patience with those he thought fools.

    I'd love to discuss others, and if anyone else is willing, let me know. As for HPL -- hmmmmm! I suppose it's a matter of whether you like "Asianic" prose or "Attic". His old-fashioned style was more a product of reading the 18th-century essayists (Addison, Steele, Johnson, Gibbon, etc.) and 17th/18th century poets rather than fictionists, with the exception of Poe. And he uses many poetic techniques in his stories to weave the atmosphere, as well. Not for those into fast-paced stories (though the chase in "Shadow Over Innsmouth" certainly shows he could do such), but I can't agree his style was at all bad; simply not something we've been used to since the turn of the century (although some of ERB's books, when you read them, are incredibly dense stylistically; not to mention Abe Merritt).

    At very least, I hope some of my comments spark more responses. This could be a great deal of fun (then again, I seem to have a peculiar taste; as my boss used to say: "You really like the weird old sh*t, don't you?"

    I look forward to others' comments; and I repeat, My God, this is refreshing!
     
    May 9, 2006
    #30
  11. Arkham

    Arkham New Member

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    Great story. Have been reading HPL for about twenty years now and revisit the stories regularly. Fantastic stuff.
     
    Aug 17, 2006
    #31
  12. Trey Greyjoy

    Trey Greyjoy Iron Price Payer

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    Darn it all, why did I have to find this thread? Looks like its time for another Amazon order. ;)
     
    Aug 17, 2006
    #32
  13. Nesacat

    Nesacat The Cat

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    Curiosity was framed. Ignorance killed the cat.
    There's been some recent compilations of all Lovecraft's tales with some very good cover art Trey and I'm sure Amazon has them. And that's only a start. If you like them, then there's all the other writers who've been playing in the playground Lovecraft created. Have fun Trey. :);) There's a whole lifetime's worth of reading and re-reading here. You'll have to begin with Cats of Ulthar of course. ;)
     
    Aug 18, 2006
    #33
  14. j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator

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    Not that the Cat's biassed, you understand...:rolleyes:
     
    Aug 18, 2006
    #34
  15. j d worthington

    j d worthington Moderator

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    I haven't noted a reference to this, so I'll pass it along; as for comments, I don't think I could do better than providing a link on the subject:

    The Lovecraft Chronicles
     
    Nov 3, 2006
    #35
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