Boromir

Legolas

something more magical
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hm...Gondor. seems like a nice place. so hy did they have to splurt out a thing like Boromir eh? :D

In the book I was like..ok he's a bit ierd.

In the film I was scared of him! He has a strange thing about his face that creeped me out!

So what do u guys think of the big ol' shield wearing man of Gondor? Did Sean Bean play him well or not? And his dad was a bit crazy wasn't he. No surprises about ol Borry then :D
:flash:
 

Shaun

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He only did what he did for the greater good of Gondor and Middle Earth. It was just that he was easily corrupted by the rings evil, as they say "The road to hell is paved with good intentions" (its amazing what you can learn from watching Star Trek.)

Boromir was portrayed differently in the movie, more sympathetic for the audience. Sean Bean did very well at his (and PJ's) interpretation of the character. Especially with his interactions with Merry and Pippin aswell as his death scene.
 

DCBastien

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The inclusion of the death scene did glorify Boromir, which the book did not fully. I thought it was a good touch-- and better for the medium of film. Very dramatic.

But before, when he jumps Frodo and then 'repents'- this also kept me personally wondering if he really had repented and realised the error of his ways......

Anyone think we should be left in the dark (more) or not?
 

Legolas

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repent...I think when the ring was out of a 5 meter radius of him he realised what he'd done in 'crazy' boromir mode - something which he couldn't stop himself doing becuase of the enchanting dsiren call of the small piece of valuable metal cursed with a power like no other....anyway.

In 'normal' boromir mode he was well upset at what he'd done so he went to help Merry and Pip (possible name for new budgie getting this week) o' course he couldn't help Frodo cos he's gone off somewhere and the ring would have made him mad agian.

This is pretty obvious stuff but people might have had some other views on the topic.

*the Aragorn and Boromir threads are there to try and get this forum going again. It got all sleepy. I hope they are working*
:flash:
 

DCBastien

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*nodnods, they did*

Well, would you say the film gave a different interpretation to it than the book? Plus, of course, it coming at the end of FOTR and not at the beginning of TTT... Which, I have to say, I thought was a good place for it to end, all in all!
 

Legolas

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*thanks*

well I would say yeah, cos in the book Boromir seemed a bit...passive to me. He wanted the ring..ok I got that much. We went a bit loopy towards the end of the FOTR, but in the film I was like whoa! He was WELL crazy! much more so then I ever imagined. So whenever I read the book now I see a very crazy boromir.

Like on the mountain - In the book that never really happened much if you get my meaning (my god I sound like Sam today) but it was a major part of the film cos we see it as the first point where Boromir is actually VERY close to the ring and has it within his grasp. Allbeit Aragorn was ready to slice his head off if he made a move but still...

:flash:
 

Legolas

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Does anyone else think if he had the brains to take his shield with him Boromir wouldn't have died from the Uruk-Hai arrows when he went to go rescue the hobits? Isn't that what a shield is for?

Just a thought.
:flash:
 

Shaun

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Yes but if he took his shield it would of made taking the ring off Frodo a lot harder. And with that many Orcs attacking him a measly shield won't do much in the way of protection.
 

Shaun

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It would have stopped a few arrows but the shield doesn't completely surround him. With that many Orcs they could have easily surrounded him and killed him. They only left him alone (sort of) because Lurtz wanted to play with his food.
 

Legolas

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oh yeah...well crazy man did put up a good battle. Merry and Pippin were a bit dumb to just go and attack the orcs, even if they were all tearful from Boromirs death...
:flash:
 

Boaz

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I just had a thought about Boromir while looking at a list of the ruling Kings and Queens of Scotland on Wikipedia.... and I'll get to it later in the post.

Now, I'd just like to comment on Boromir's character... as the above posts do..

Boromir was the most privileged man in Gondor. He had the best training in arms, politics, finances, history, rhetoric, diplomacy, etc. Gondor was the most advanced nation in the world... and thus you could conclude that he (and his younger brother, Faramir) were the most educated, the most learned, the most prepared men in the world to take a stand against Sauron.

Samwise was a gardener from Hobbiton. He was the most unprepared person to defy Sauron the Great.

Boromir and Sam are juxtaposed by Tolkien. Boromir should have been (perhaps more than Aragorn), the one person to be Frodo's guardian all the way to Mount Doom, but he failed in the first third of the story. The daily mundane tasks.... the lack of head bashing... and the waiting, the waiting and more waiting drove him to renounce his vow. On the other hand, gardening taught Sam patience. He could plod for months on end. He did not mind small tasks. He did not need adoring crowds.

Poor Boromir.

As for the movie, Boromir's redemption was very well done. I applaud Jackson and his team.

Now... to the Kings and Queens of Scotland. The Stewarts/Stuarts were the longest reigning dynasty of Scotland.

When Faramir interrogates Frodo, he reveals a bit about Boromir's childhood.

The Two Towers, Book Four, The Window on the West....

'And this I remember of Boromir as a boy, when we together learned the tale of our sires and the history of our city, that always it displeased him that his father was not the king. "How many hundreds of years needs it to make a steward a king, if the king returns not?" he asked. "Few years, maybe, in other places of less royalty," my father answered. "In Gondor ten thousand years would not suffice." Alas! poor Boromir. Does that not tell you something of him?'
Since Tolkien's works are to be a mythology of England, was this a direct shot at the Stewarts/Stuarts of Scotland?

The Balliol-Bruce feud was over and Scotland needed a leader to defend against the English (Edward III and the Black Prince) and to keep good relations with France (Charles V). Robert Stewart, seventh High Steward of Scotland, became Robert II, King of Scotland. The Stewarts later came to rule England as well.

Boromir is portrayed more like the Rohirrim... proud, strong, and uncultured... rather than a Numenorean like Elendil, Isildur, Denethor, Faramir, and Elessar Telcontar... noble in spirit, wise, and seeking justice.

Scotland = Rohan... wild and beautiful.
England = Numenor... dignified and judicious.

Or is it merely coincidence?
 

The Big Peat

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On the latter part - I would say Rohan is far too clearly based on the Anglo-Saxon England Tolkien loved for it to be some sort of shot at Scotland.
 

Narkalui

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Stewart does also mean Steward. I'm pretty sure Tolkien would have known this. But was he making a subtle dig at Scotland? Frankly I can't see it, I just get the feeling he was far too polite.

Also there is Tolkien's long and oft repeated assertion that there were no intended allegories in TLotR.

Though I must say I do like you comparison between Boromir and Samwise
 

farntfar

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You might consider that Boromir’s main purpose in the story is to show how corrupting the presence of the ring is with its promise of power to the wearer, even and especially to the mighty.
The constrast between Boromir and Faramir is also very clear, as it is with Sam. (Note Gandalf’s words to Pippin in Minas Tirith, that the blood of Numenor ran almost true in Faramir’s veins, though not in Boromir’s.)
You’ll also remember how mutually admirative Faramir and Sam are at the hidden camp, precisely because of this.
As has been said, Boromir’s temptation was one of “good intention”, seeing , as he did, only the strength the ring offered him to save Gondor, and not the need to dominate that it would also bring.
I’m also surprised that you think that his redemption, trying to protect Merry and Pippin, was weakly described in the book. I didn’t feel that at all, although I did think it was very well done in the film.
Oh. One last point. Wouldn’t you say that even Isildur was partially corrupted by it on his way back to Arnor after Sauron's first defeat? Boromir was in good company.
 

Boaz

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farntfar, I was not implying that Tolkien's description of Boromir's redemption was not well done. Tolkien really did not describe it as graphically as Jackson showed it. Aragorn frantically tried to assist Boromir, but by the time he arrived Boromir was mortally wounded and lay among scores of orcs. Faramir told Frodo of this by saying something like, "I am sure he died achieving some noble purpose, because his face was more beautiful and peaceful than ever before." I was trying to state that I saw a positive aspect of Jackson's story... because I am usually hyper-critical of the films.

As for the comparison to Isildur... you're spot on. Isildur should have thrown the Ring into Oroduin, but his pride and pain allowed him to be tempted (or to mislead himself) to choose foolishly.

And among the mightiest of the Edain and Dunedain, who would have resisted completely? Aragorn and Faramir did. Elendil, Amandil, Tar-Palantir, Elros, Earendil, Tuor, Beren, Barahir and Beor might have resisted. But Denethor, Earnur, Ar-Pharazon, Tar-Atanamir, Turin, and many others would have succumbed. I'd bet a number of the Eldar could not have resisted... e.g. the seven sons of Feanor.

I don't mean to disparage Isildur and Boromir... If I was a character in Arda, I would not be a hero... or even a tragic hero... I'd probably be Ioreth (the talkative woman in the House of Healing) or Nob (Butterbur's helpful, if not too bright, servant).
 

Narkalui

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That's one of a few points where Jackson got it right and Tolkien got it wrong:
At the council of Elrond: "Gondor needs no King."
At Parth Galen: "I would have followed you my brother, my Captain, my King!"
It sends shivers down my spine just writing those two quotes!
 

paranoid marvin

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Of course Boromir may have taken the ring, defeated the forces of evil, destroyed Sauron forever and brought peace and prosperity to Middle Earth. Just because some say the ring corrupts absolutely doesn't mean it is true for all...
 

farntfar

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I'd bet a number of the Eldar could not have resisted... e.g. the seven sons of Feanor.
Their cousin, Galadriel, did.

Just because some say the ring corrupts absolutely doesn't mean it is true for all...
You've been watching too much Lucifer. He'd never have started hell if only there'd been a need for a decent night club at the beginning of the world. :)
 
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