What was the last movie you saw?

Randy M.

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Hillbillys in a Haunted House (1967)

The "hillbillys" (sic!) are actually a country singer, his blonde, curvaceous co-star, and their manager. You can tell he's the comedy relief (in a comedy!) because his name is Jeepers and he constantly acts nervous, in a Don Knotts kind of way. They're driving along in one of those big, fancy cars decorated with fake guns and rifles, and a big pair of longhorn cattle horns on the front. They run into a gun battle between cops and a couple of spies. It seems that the local metropolis, Acme City, has a missile plant, and there are spies all over the place. Well, our trio winds up in the tiny community of Sleepy Junction, with no place to stay but the local abandoned mansion, which is said to be, you guessed it, haunted. Down in the cellar are Lon Chaney, Jr., John Carradine, and Basil Rathbone, along with a boss lady named Madame Wong, a gorilla named Anatole, and a bunch of electronic equipment. Of course, they're spies, and are faking the haunting stuff to cover up their activities. A whole bunch of country songs and supposedly comic antics follow. There's also a real ghost, very briefly. The Good Guy spies work for M.O.T.H.E.R. (Master Organization to Halt Enemy Resistance.) The comedy relief gets to say "weirdwolf" for "werewolf." The biggest country star in this thing, Merle Haggard, shows up on the television the three dragged into the mansion. After an hour of this nonsense, we get a full twenty minutes of a country music concert. The End. Amazingly, this is actually a sequel, to the equally misspelt Las Vegas Hillbillys.


Oh, man. Ferlin Husky and Joi Lansing? I recall Lansing as a TV equivalent for Marilyn Monroe, and rather less annoying than some other MM imitators like Mansfield and Van Doren. This wasn't her first foray in hillbilly territory, either. I remember her from The Beverly Hillbillies and IMDB reminds me she played Lester Flatt's wife. Husky was maybe best known for the song "Wings of a Dove," during which his twang was occasionally punctuated with a throb, as I recall. Mostly I remember the name from all the ads for Time/Life CDs of the old Country hit songs.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Rocket Attack U.S.A. (1958)

Bottom of the barrel atomic paranoia flick. Sputnik goes up, so an American spy goes to the USSR to see what its purpose might be. Sneaking into the Soviet Union consists of being flown in a small plane just over the border, then having the ever-present narrator tell us it will take "one to five weeks" (?) for the hero to reach Moscow on foot, then cutting to the guy in a Moscow nightclub (a small room with some tables and a belly dancer.) His contact is a woman who is the mistress of the Minister of Defense who talks too much when he's drunk. It turns out that Sputnik just gave the Soviets enough information to prepare their ICBM for launching at the USA. Our two heroes, after a little smooching, sneak into the missile base (it seems to be guarded by one guy) and attach a bomb to the ICBM. Wonder of wonders, they fail in their mission and both get shot down. Then we get scenes of the Soviets launching the thing, and folks in the USA listening to air raid sirens and such. New York City gets blown up. Nuclear armageddon has never been so dull. Tons of stock footage, lots of scenes of folks talking in tiny rooms, plenty of padding. The belly dancing scene and the missile launching scene seem to go on forever.
 

AstroZon

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Echo in the Canyon (2018) d: Andrew Slater

Unfocused and uneven documentary about the 60s Los Angeles music scene - specifically the folk rock era between 1965 and 1970. It's also a story that has been told over and over in both print and film (and internet bloggers and YouTube content creators.) The more recent documentary, Laurel Canyon, is much better.

Anyway, Jakob Dylan sort of hosts Echo in the Canyon - he leads us around LA anyway. There is a panel of modern performers Beck, Regina Spektor, and Cat Power sitting around a coffee table in an upscale LA house. But for the life of me, I can't figure out what they're doing there. They weren't even born yet, and the houses lived in by the Laurel Canyon crowd weren't swank by any means. Tom Petty is featured quite a bit as well, but he didn't move to LA until later in the 70s. Still he had to have known the LA music scene well. Also I did like Eric Clapton's comparison of the recording industry in London to its counterpart in LA. And both he and Ringo Starr talk about their encounters in Laurel Canyon in the 60s.

We do finally get to the real Laurel Canyon scene - interviews with musicians who lived and recorded there: Michelle Philips, Stephen Stills, David Crosby, Roger McGuinn, Jackson Browne, and Brian Wilson. Notably MIA was Joni Mitchell.
 
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therapist

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Jan 2, 2021
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Godzilla vs. Kong
Walks a thin line between epic and parody. Substantial property damage ensues.
I just watched this. An interesting case study on how to make an interesting concept boring and dull. The trick is to have awful characters and dialogue, pump it full of overused tropes and cliches, and sprinkle in some plot holes.
 

Jeffbert

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Hillbillys in a Haunted House (1967)

The "hillbillys" (sic!) are actually a country singer, his blonde, curvaceous co-star, and their manager. You can tell he's the comedy relief (in a comedy!) because his name is Jeepers and he constantly acts nervous, in a Don Knotts kind of way. They're driving along in one of those big, fancy cars decorated with fake guns and rifles, and a big pair of longhorn cattle horns on the front. They run into a gun battle between cops and a couple of spies. It seems that the local metropolis, Acme City, has a missile plant, and there are spies all over the place. Well, our trio winds up in the tiny community of Sleepy Junction, with no place to stay but the local abandoned mansion, which is said to be, you guessed it, haunted. Down in the cellar are Lon Chaney, Jr., John Carradine, and Basil Rathbone, along with a boss lady named Madame Wong, a gorilla named Anatole, and a bunch of electronic equipment. Of course, they're spies, and are faking the haunting stuff to cover up their activities. A whole bunch of country songs and supposedly comic antics follow. There's also a real ghost, very briefly. The Good Guy spies work for M.O.T.H.E.R. (Master Organization to Halt Enemy Resistance.) The comedy relief gets to say "weirdwolf" for "werewolf." The biggest country star in this thing, Merle Haggard, shows up on the television the three dragged into the mansion. After an hour of this nonsense, we get a full twenty minutes of a country music concert. The End. Amazingly, this is actually a sequel, to the equally misspelt Las Vegas Hillbillys.
I know I have seen this! :giggle: not for discerning viewers.
Rocket Attack U.S.A. (1958)

Bottom of the barrel atomic paranoia flick. Sputnik goes up, so an American spy goes to the USSR to see what its purpose might be. Sneaking into the Soviet Union consists of being flown in a small plane just over the border, then having the ever-present narrator tell us it will take "one to five weeks" (?) for the hero to reach Moscow on foot, then cutting to the guy in a Moscow nightclub (a small room with some tables and a belly dancer.) His contact is a woman who is the mistress of the Minister of Defense who talks too much when he's drunk. It turns out that Sputnik just gave the Soviets enough information to prepare their ICBM for launching at the USA. Our two heroes, after a little smooching, sneak into the missile base (it seems to be guarded by one guy) and attach a bomb to the ICBM. Wonder of wonders, they fail in their mission and both get shot down. Then we get scenes of the Soviets launching the thing, and folks in the USA listening to air raid sirens and such. New York City gets blown up. Nuclear armageddon has never been so dull. Tons of stock footage, lots of scenes of folks talking in tiny rooms, plenty of padding. The belly dancing scene and the missile launching scene seem to go on forever.
I want to see this!



CURSE OF THE CANNIBAL CONFEDERATES (1982) TROMA made this, and it likely classified it as TRASH-O-RAMA. It is the 1st movie I watched on DVD for many months.

So, there were these long dead Rebel soldiers who placed a curse on their graves? :ROFLMAO: Six young adults out on a camping trip, just happen to defile their graves. Zombie attacks follow, but even at 1.5x it was too slow.

Simply awful.
 

Judderman

The Iceman cometh
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The Possession (2012). I’ve seen plenty of possession or exorcism movies over the years. I usually enjoy them, or at least find them creepy, but I couldn’t tell you which one stood out. They are generally similar. This one had a slightly different style with Jewish involvement instead of Catholic.
 

Jeffbert

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Dec 23, 2011
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1,091
BACKFIRE (1950) Two ex-Army buddies intend to invest in a cattle ranch, but one Steve Connolly (Edmond O'Brien) suddenly vanishes, while the other Bob Corey (Gordon MacRae) is recuperating in the hospital. After leaving the hospital, Corey goes on an intensive search for his friend; though the police try to dissuade him, because Connolly is suspected of murder.

A very good drama, with whodunit elements throughout. Best of all, I had no memory of having seen it before! Good supporting cast!



KIND LADY (1935) Mary Herries (Aline MacMahon) is a wealthy woman living in England, Just days before Christmas, she encounters a man drawing sidewalk art with colored chalk near her home. Henry Abbott (Basil Rathbone; whom we already know is the villain, merely because he is not Sherlock Holmes!) He is obviously cold, and asks for a cup of tea; she invites him in, & after he leaves, with her expensive cigarette case in his pocket, that seems to end the thing. Yet, a few days later, he returns, also returning the case, apologizing, with a sob story about his ailing wife and infant. The next thing the woman knows, half-a-dozen more people have come, all intending to stay. They make her a prisoner in her own home, and insist she sign over the titles or whatever is used for valuable paintings. They also have intents on her bank account.

Saw this a few years ago, but with that villain of villains as the villain, I watched it again. :devilish: The guy is smooth!


Oh! almost forgot that I have been trying to get a good view of the cigarettes they used, but the pack seems pure white.
 

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