What was the last movie you saw?

Guttersnipe

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The Devil's Candy (2015): Definitely had the creepiness I was going for. The actor that was chosen to
play the antagonist was disturbingly good. The only gripe I really have with it is that it's too short and
I think it really could've benefited from a longer run-time.

Stir of Echoes (1999): Based on the Richard Matheson novel. A few small scenes in the beginning were a bit
too gruesome for me. I often hear the terms "supernatural thriller" and "horror" used interchangeably;
I think this film is more thrilling than horrifying. I was pleasantly surprised to see a brief shot of The
Shrinking Man in it.

Let the Right One In (Låt den rätte komma in) (2008): Going into this, I knew only that it was a horror
romance film with vampires. I expected the lovebirds to be older. It was a nice transition into a quieter
kind of horror, but, as with Stir of Echoes, I wasn't too scared. The most intense parts were really whenever
the boy was being bullied. It was a strangely heartwarming experience for me. Also based on a novel.

I feel compelled to award these three films with an 8 out of 10 rating.
 

Toby Frost

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I really liked Stir of Echoes, but I felt it went on a bit. It had a convincingly everyday, blue-collar feel, and the hypnosis was really unsettling. Kevin Bacon and Illeana Douglas are very good.

Sean of the Dead: less funny than I remember, but more gruesome and probably a better film overall. I expected it to be like a longer episode of the sitcom Spaced, but it's more than that. Decent stuff.
 

CupofJoe

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The Blue Dahlia [1946] by George Marshall, with a screenplay by Raymond Chandler.
One of the best Noires I've seen in a long while. Starring Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, William Bendix, Hugh Beaumont and a lot of other good old-Hollywood actors. The plot rattles along with enough twists and turns to make it interesting with losing the focus. It plays like a lost Marlow story [if Marlow had come back from the war to find his wife entertaining people at home].
 

Randy M.

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The Blue Dahlia [1946] by George Marshall, with a screenplay by Raymond Chandler.
One of the best Noires I've seen in a long while. Starring Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake, William Bendix, Hugh Beaumont and a lot of other good old-Hollywood actors. The plot rattles along with enough twists and turns to make it interesting with losing the focus. It plays like a lost Marlow story [if Marlow had come back from the war to find his wife entertaining people at home].
A long time ago there was a paperback released of the screenplay with a foreward by John Houseman, the producer. Fascinating stuff. I imagine working with Chandler was, at best, trying.

Randy M.
 

Phyrebrat

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Last night I went way-exotic and instead of rewatching one of the Star Wars sequels or a supernatural horror, I plumped for Zodiac.

Enjoyed it but wondered what the point of Iron Man’s character was - he really led nowhere as far as I can remember and also just played the same role as in the MCU without the ramjets :D

I’ve also been enjoying the James Whale Frankenstein from 1930 which I’m ashamed to say I’ve never seen until now. I’ve never been a fan of the whole set up but it’s a beautiful thing. Altho why they’ve cut the shot of the girl floating face-down in the lake after he hoys her in struck me as odd in a day and age when Negan can be shown smashing the heads of Glen And Abraham in TWD; it is quite beyond my programming.

I was also delighted to decide I can justifiably call the monster Frankenstein as opposed to F’s monster: there’s a scene on the wedding day where they’re discussing heirs and a son and Victor Frankenstein (called Henry in this, confusingly) is going all shades of (monochrome) green with the symbolism. So he already figures he has a son hence Frankenstein is kinda-sorta arguably allowed as a moniker for the monster. Admittedly this might be a conceit of the film and not Mary Shelley’s vision, but I suppose as a pop icon Frankenstein is more well known from the movie rather than her book.

Anyway, I’ve enjoyed it. It’s not a patch on my favourite The Old Dark House - one of the best films ever made if only for the script, and Eva Moore’s Rebecca Femm (another James Whale), or The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari, but it’s up there quite high!

I’ve been watching the odd Messiah of Evil (1973) on Youtube which has elements reminiscent of Carnival of Souls but I’m not sure where the hell it’s going - Altho I’m enjoying it, too.

Okay enough of my waffles

pH
 

Randy M.

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The Ghoul (1933) dir. T. Hayes Hunter; starring Boris Karloff, Cedric Hardwicke, Ernest Thesiger, Ralph Richardson

Dying Egyptologist who takes Anubis seriously has a valuable jewel placed in his hand as an offering to Anubis and to immortality. Jewel is taken from his dead hand and he returns to life to track it down and punish the thief. Or maybe not. It might just be catalepsy and coincidence. Or not.

I don't recall ever seeing this before, and Ben Mankiewicz who introduced it said it was rarely seen, made in England when Karloff left Hollywood during a contract dispute with Universal Pictures following his successes after Frankenstein. Mankiewicz also said it wasn't well-regarded in its day, and it is a bit clunky, not as intense or interesting as Karloff's earlier The Mummy, interesting mainly for Karloff and the rather light-hearted performance turned in by Richardson early in his career.


Blood and Black Lace (1964) dir. Mario Bava; starring Cameron Mitchell, Eva Bartok

Nasty little movie, which I don't entirely mean as an insult. Begins with the killing of a model as she approaches the fashion house she works for, her murder stemming from earlier nefarious events like murder and blackmail. There's a diary that leads to more murders, and finally the revelation of who's behind it all. My take away is that Bava or his cinematographer must have loved his color palette. Scenes are drenched in colors, mostly red, green, purple, some white and some brown. The killer appears wearing a black hat and coat (though late in the movie they look more of a dark blue) with a white mask, which makes the other colors pop more. Note that scenes with the police are more sedately colored, Bava apparently contrasting the mundane with the more Baroque and Gothic.

Oh, and at least three male voices in the movie sound like they were dubbed by Paul Frees ... and IMDB confirms it. Oddly, they don't include Mitchell's character, but Mitchell's voice didn't sound like I remember it from his days on the tv show, The High Chaparral.


Randy M.
 

Randy M.

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Last night I went way-exotic and instead of rewatching one of the Star Wars sequels or a supernatural horror, I plumped for Zodiac.

Enjoyed it but wondered what the point of Iron Man’s character was - he really led nowhere as far as I can remember and also just played the same role as in the MCU without the ramjets :D

I’ve also been enjoying the James Whale Frankenstein from 1930 which I’m ashamed to say I’ve never seen until now. I’ve never been a fan of the whole set up but it’s a beautiful thing. Altho why they’ve cut the shot of the girl floating face-down in the lake after he hoys her in struck me as odd in a day and age when Negan can be shown smashing the heads of Glen And Abraham in TWD; it is quite beyond my programming.

I was also delighted to decide I can justifiably call the monster Frankenstein as opposed to F’s monster: there’s a scene on the wedding day where they’re discussing heirs and a son and Victor Frankenstein (called Henry in this, confusingly) is going all shades of (monochrome) green with the symbolism. So he already figures he has a son hence Frankenstein is kinda-sorta arguably allowed as a moniker for the monster. Admittedly this might be a conceit of the film and not Mary Shelley’s vision, but I suppose as a pop icon Frankenstein is more well known from the movie rather than her book.

Anyway, I’ve enjoyed it. It’s not a patch on my favourite The Old Dark House - one of the best films ever made if only for the script, and Eva Moore’s Rebecca Femm (another James Whale), or The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari, but it’s up there quite high!

I’ve been watching the odd Messiah of Evil (1973) on Youtube which has elements reminiscent of Carnival of Souls but I’m not sure where the hell it’s going - Altho I’m enjoying it, too.

Okay enough of my waffles

pH
I liked Zodiac and should watch it again. Anyway, now you've watched the 1931 Frankenstein, when you get a chance if you haven't already, catch the 1933 Invisible Man and the 1935 Bride of Frankenstein, all directed by Whale (ditto The Old Dark House) and with a peculiar sensibility that Universal never matched again.

Randy M.
 

Phyrebrat

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when you get a chance if you haven't already, catch the 1933 Invisible Man and the 1935 Bride of Frankenstein, all directed by Whale
I have been after The Invisible Man for a while as it’s meant to be a corker. (Hopefully it’ll wash the taste of last years’ remake from my mouth). And I’ve seen Bride when I was a kid so I’d like to see it properly.

Thanks for the tips. Here’s one in return: I see Bava on your list. If you’re into giallo I can recommend my favourite ever which is ‘The House with the Laughing Windows’. Very unsettling. Very cool.

pH
 

Randy M.

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Thanks, pH. I'll keep that in mind. The Bava showed as part of our old movie channel's October/Halloween showings so I recorded it since I'd heard of it. We'll see if more show up.

Randy M.
 

Jeffbert

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3 with Max von Sydow:


THE SEVENTH SEAL (1957) I saw it some years ago, & am glad I watched it again. Very glad I did not live then!

VIRGIN SPRING (1960) Naughty goatherds rape and murder the guy's daughter, then, want to sell her clothes to him, not realizing who he is.

Eli Roth's History of Horror s2, e1 which I watched a day later made reference to this film, as the basis for a horror movie, I think it was LAST HOUSE ON THE LEFT, but don't quote me on that! Violence ensues!

So, hundreds of years ago, the deeply religious family sends the daughter to the Church to deliver candles or whatever, and this young hot blonde goes out on horseback riding through the woods, without a male escort!? Other than that oddity, this seemed a decent plot.


HOUR OF THE WOLF (1968) Wished I had skipped this one. The guy, lives on a remote island, owned by some other guy. The guy paints still life, etc. , & weird things happen.



SEDUCED AND ABANDONED (1964) Italian with subs; family has eldest daughter engaged to young guy, who seduces the youngest daughter and has his way with her. Papa is furious, & demands he marry her. But, since she did the deed without marriage, she is not good enough for him, even though he seduced her. Too long for my tastes, but not bad.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Dark Shadows (2012)

Tim Burton's reimagining of the old supernatural soap opera. I'll damn it with faint praise by saying that it's not as bad as most feature films taken from television series of the 1960's/1970's. Given atrocities like Car 54, Where Are You? and Wild Wild West, that's not saying much at all. It may, in fact, be the best of this kind of thing I have ever seen, although I am quite fond of The Brady Bunch Movie. (I haven't seen The Addams Family, which has a good reputation.)

Anyway, the pre-credits sequence, in which Barnabas Collins, in voice over, relates the story of how he was cursed to become a vampire, is excellent. The spectacular visuals -- I assume all big budget movies of this century look this beautiful -- are justified, and the mood is perfect.

The opening credits -- just a scene of a train passing through gorgeous scenery -- is lovely. Once the story gets going, however, the jarring changes of mood, from Gothic romance to farce, really put me off. Casting Alice Cooper as himself seemed to be just a gimmick. The contrast between very silly scenes like the vampire brushing his fangs, with no reflection in the mirror, and the truly terrifying and tragic childhood of the female lead was disturbing.

The ending, with the final battle between the witch and the vampire, was way over the top. I felt that the movie was shoving as many special effects at me as it could, just to overwhelm me. The way the battle ends was anticlimactic.

I have no problem with Johnny Depp's performance as the vampire. Everybody else in the cast seems to be sort of winking at the audience.

Overall, very much of a curate's egg.
 

BAYLOR

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Dark Shadows (2012)

Tim Burton's reimagining of the old supernatural soap opera. I'll damn it with faint praise by saying that it's not as bad as most feature films taken from television series of the 1960's/1970's. Given atrocities like Car 54, Where Are You? and Wild Wild West, that's not saying much at all. It may, in fact, be the best of this kind of thing I have ever seen, although I am quite fond of The Brady Bunch Movie. (I haven't seen The Addams Family, which has a good reputation.)

Anyway, the pre-credits sequence, in which Barnabas Collins, in voice over, relates the story of how he was cursed to become a vampire, is excellent. The spectacular visuals -- I assume all big budget movies of this century look this beautiful -- are justified, and the mood is perfect.

The opening credits -- just a scene of a train passing through gorgeous scenery -- is lovely. Once the story gets going, however, the jarring changes of mood, from Gothic romance to farce, really put me off. Casting Alice Cooper as himself seemed to be just a gimmick. The contrast between very silly scenes like the vampire brushing his fangs, with no reflection in the mirror, and the truly terrifying and tragic childhood of the female lead was disturbing.

The ending, with the final battle between the witch and the vampire, was way over the top. I felt that the movie was shoving as many special effects at me as it could, just to overwhelm me. The way the battle ends was anticlimactic.

I have no problem with Johnny Depp's performance as the vampire. Everybody else in the cast seems to be sort of winking at the audience.

Overall, very much of a curate's egg.
Jonathan Frid the original Barnabas Collins , had a cameo I that film.
 

hitmouse

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Dark Shadows (2012)

Tim Burton's reimagining of the old supernatural soap opera. I'll damn it with faint praise by saying that it's not as bad as most feature films taken from television series of the 1960's/1970's. Given atrocities like Car 54, Where Are You? and Wild Wild West, that's not saying much at all. It may, in fact, be the best of this kind of thing I have ever seen, although I am quite fond of The Brady Bunch Movie. (I haven't seen The Addams Family, which has a good reputation.)

Anyway, the pre-credits sequence, in which Barnabas Collins, in voice over, relates the story of how he was cursed to become a vampire, is excellent. The spectacular visuals -- I assume all big budget movies of this century look this beautiful -- are justified, and the mood is perfect.

The opening credits -- just a scene of a train passing through gorgeous scenery -- is lovely. Once the story gets going, however, the jarring changes of mood, from Gothic romance to farce, really put me off. Casting Alice Cooper as himself seemed to be just a gimmick. The contrast between very silly scenes like the vampire brushing his fangs, with no reflection in the mirror, and the truly terrifying and tragic childhood of the female lead was disturbing.

The ending, with the final battle between the witch and the vampire, was way over the top. I felt that the movie was shoving as many special effects at me as it could, just to overwhelm me. The way the battle ends was anticlimactic.

I have no problem with Johnny Depp's performance as the vampire. Everybody else in the cast seems to be sort of winking at the audience.

Overall, very much of a curate's egg.
Pretty much my thoughts too.

The Addams family movies are really quite good.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Jonathan Frid the original Barnabas Collins , had a cameo I that film.
Yes, as did other actors from the original: Kathryn Leigh Scott (Maggie Evans), Lara Parker (Angelique), and David Selby (Quentin Collins.)

At home, we are currently watching the complete original series, over several months, and we have the 1990's remake of the series (only 12 episodes, unlike the original, which had well over 1000) and the film Night of Dark Shadows on our To Be Watched pile. We also own several books about the series, autographed by Kathryn Leigh Scott.

You may notice a pattern here.
 

Jeffbert

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THE GHOUL (1933) Boris Karloff had a dispute with Universal, so, he returned to England, & made this. I must have seen this before, because the one thing that was familiar was the extremely talkative woman, who was just fawning over the guy who identified himself as a Sheikh. She was occasionally funny, but the poor guy was just annoyed to death. Anyway, for a Karloff film, it was a bit disappointing because at the end, the Ghoul, just fell over dead, though the mausoleum was on fire. It just paled compared to the Universal horror films he made.

So, the great renowned Egyptologist Professor Morlant (Boris Karloff) is on or in his deathbed, and hopes to attain immortality by having a sacred object held in his hand when he dies, etc. But why then is he buried / interred in a sarcophagus? Maybe the thing he sought was on the other side? Anyway, there are two guys after the thing, a jewel, I guess, but as it was dark scene, I could hardly tell what it was. So, apparently, he had stolen the thing from a tomb, & these guys were attempting to recover it. So, he croaks, and is interned in his mausoleum or whatever it is called, but his servant, thinking his beliefs were nonsense, took the jewel out of his clenched fist after he died. Bad move! Sure enough, the Ghoul returned from the dead, to seek revenge, etc.

So, Ben M. said that it was rarely shown, and had been considered a lost film. Nice to see it, anyway, but I am near certain I saw it not too long ago.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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The Ghost of Sierra de Cobre (1964)

Started off as a pilot for a supernatural TV series, then had extra footage and a much different ending added to make it into a movie. Martin Landau stars as an architect/ghost hunter who lives in this groovy ultra-modern house on a cliff near the sea. He gets mixed up with a blind man who believes he is getting phone calls from his dead mother. We find out pretty quickly that the complex plot features both real and fake hauntings. The backstory involves the blind man's wife and a spooky housekeeper (Judith Anderson, playing a role very similar to the one she played in Rebecca.) It all has something to do with a supposed haunting in Mexico some time ago, the source of the film's title, which Landau exposed as a hoax and a murder. Written and directed by Joseph Stefano. It's beautifully filmed in moody black-and-white, and has tons of atmosphere and some sharp dialogue. Well worth a look.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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House of Mortal Sin AKA The Confessional (1976)

Here's how to stir up some controversy; make a horror movie about an insane, homicidal priest, who even uses holy objects to commit his murders. The madman records a young woman's confession and becomes obsessed with her, first badly beating up the fellow he thinks is her boyfriend, sending him to the hospital. Not much later he murders the real boyfriend. Other killings follow, mostly to cover up his crimes. The murderer lives with his very elderly, infirm mother (he's no spring chicken himself) and a sinister housekeeper (is there any other kind in these movies?) who wears glasses with one black lens, to cover up her badly deformed eye. The young woman can't get anybody to believe her when she figures out what's going on. Don't expect a happy ending. There's a young, good guy priest, who eventually wants to leave the Church to get married, to serve as our hero. The older folks portraying the killer priest and his housekeeper are both very good in their evil roles, far outdoing the nice people. The premise may seem distasteful, but it's an effective shocker.
 

Matchu

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I found 'Seventh Seal' very difficult.

I was obsessed with 'Wild Strawberries' for quite a long time, and then later on, Max Von Sydow with his pipe and hammer at the start of 'Passion of Anna.'

I've been watching:
The Knight Templar - Arn Magnusson

I'm on the second section, Daily Motion: it's dipped a little, turning schlossy-kissy-wussy...nonetheless, Part One was suitable for for all of the Viking relatives. I'm searching for the dirty, really earthy, aesthetic [hew] in medieval depiction, I might find it in Russian cinema, somff like that, almost a 'Robin & Marian' vibe [euch]...


If anybody is 'Robin Hood genre' - fairly interested how film-makers develop 'The Wake,' Kingsnorth - the most affecting book for me this year, film rights sold.
 

Toby Frost

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I enjoyed The Seventh Seal, but I was expecting it to be almost incomprehensible. There was less of Death playing chess than I'd anticipated, and a lot more of jolly peasants and maidens putting on a show. At least, I'm pretty sure that's what happened!
 
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