What was the last movie you saw?

Randy M.

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He Walked by Night (1948) dir. Alfred Werker, though the host (Turner Cable Movies) said Anthony Mann took over early in production

Richard Basehart as a smart, cold blooded killer, looking to make a lot of money without scruples. He steals, he kills cops, and he eludes detection for months. That's pretty much the story, with a lot of following police around doing their work. Scott Brady (brother of that other film noir tough guy, Lawrence Tierney) is the cop assigned to the case, and he's good, as usual, as a stoic, tough guy. But the movie is essentially Basehart's and Mann's; Basehart's extremely effective as an unemotional, ruthless killer, clever enough to elude police. And Mann's direction uses every trick from camera angles to lighting to add to the noir atmosphere. Really a superior little thriller. Look close you'll see Jack Webb (influenced, apparently, by working on this when creating his TV show, Dragnet) and John Dehner, who appeared in TV shows for the next 30+ years.


The Skull (1965) dir. Freddie Francis; starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Patrick Wymark, Jill Bennett

A scholar in the history of Black Magic, and a disbeliever in same, acquires the skull of the Marquis de Sade and it has a very bad influence on him. Based on the story, "The Skull of the Marquis de Sade" by Robert Bloch, it mostly follows the story with some added frills to fill in the 90 minute play time. An Amicus production, the effects are sufficient if, nowadays, a bit hokey, but Cushing and Lee make it work with the aid of a strong supporting cast that includes Nigel Green, Patrick Magee and, very briefly, Michael Gough. Fun, the story is a little dubious, but by no means a bad movie.

Randy M.
 

Starbeast

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Meet Dave (2008) - I didn't know this movie existed until last night. Pretty good sci-fi comedy flick, about tiny aliens who travel to Earth on a mission to save their world. Actor/comedian Eddie Murphy, stars as the alien space ship captain.

Good Will Hunting (1997) - Stars the late/great Robin Williams, along with Matt Damon and Ben Affleck It took me a while to finally see this one......and to think, I hesitated. I thought this film is an awesome drama. One of Robin Williams best films. It's an astonishing tale about a relationship between a therapist and a highly intelligent, troubled youth searching to find his purpose in life.


RE-WATCHED

Lilies of the Field (1963) - Fantastic film about a handyman (played by the late/great actor Sydney Poitier), who decides to help a group of Nuns build a chapel in a desert. Tremendously great drama. It was a treat to see this classic gem of a movie, after many years. Amen Mr Poitier.

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Goldfinger (1964) - Always fun to watch this slightly dated Bond flick. Sean Connery is so cool as the dashing spy, who's trying to stop a gold obsessed madman.

Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Sean Connery as James Bond 007, goes after Ernst Stavro Blofeld (wonderfully acted by Charles Gray) in this movie. Such a great entry in the series.

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Randy M.

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Hey, Starbeast, unless there's been news in the last couple of days I haven't heard, I don't think Sidney Poitier is late.

Randy M.
 

AlexH

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COLOSSUS THE FORBIN PROJECT (1970) If the film had merely been content to do a version of Frankenstein with a machine it would be worthy of note, but what makes it such a compelling story is that Forbin is not just a creator who discovers his creation has gotten out of hand--in fact, he is happy and flattered to see that his computer is learning and defying its original boundaries. Even when he finds himself under surveillance and stripped naked, he can still be amused by the unintentional humor of Colossus. "You were not born with a watch." And unlike Frankenstein, Forbin is not destroyed by his creation but transformed-- the role of creator and creation (or parent and child) has been reversed. This is what constitutes the biggest psychological blow.

"In time you will come to regard me not only with respect and awe, but with love. "

50 years later Colossus is proven right. We all love Colossus now, our all-knowing benevolent caretaker.
I watched this at a secret cinema event in a nuclear bunker with actors around the bunker playing parts from the cold war era. It was an excellent experience!

I haven't felt like watching a film for a couple of weeks, so nothing new from me.
 

Jeffbert

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COLOSSUS THE FORBIN PROJECT (1970) If the film had merely been content to do a version of Frankenstein with a machine it would be worthy of note, but what makes it such a compelling story is that Forbin is not just a creator who discovers his creation has gotten out of hand--in fact, he is happy and flattered to see that his computer is learning and defying its original boundaries. Even when he finds himself under surveillance and stripped naked, he can still be amused by the unintentional humor of Colossus. "You were not born with a watch." And unlike Frankenstein, Forbin is not destroyed by his creation but transformed-- the role of creator and creation (or parent and child) has been reversed. This is what constitutes the biggest psychological blow.

"In time you will come to regard me not only with respect and awe, but with love. "

50 years later Colossus is proven right. We all love Colossus now, our all-knowing benevolent caretaker.
I vaguely remember this; thoroughly enjoyed it. I thought they were remaking it. :eek: It has been in the works since 2007! Will they ever really make it?
 

BAYLOR

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Justice League The Flashpoint Paradox Barry Allen goes back in time and saves his mother. This is a very good film. :cool:
 

KGeo777

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Watched FLASH GORDON 1936. It was higher budget than I expected and the fx were not as bad as I remembered from clips, but they did leave something to be desired as it progressed. Lizards with rubber glued on their backs, a bear painted like a skunk, a flimsy looking monster suit and a much better gorilla suit with a horn glued on it. Lion Men who looked like Grizzly Adams.
But on the plus side, the casting was pretty good. Dale Arden was a little bland (was she a blonde in the comic strip?), but Flash Gordon, Ming, Zarkov, and especially Princess Aura were great. Sam Jones looks more like Buster Crabbe that I realized. If he had the same haircut and more personality..
As serials go I don't think it is in the top ten, but given the technical and budgetary restrictions, can't complain.
As much as I enjoy the 1980 film, it's too whimsical and deficient in fantasy to be a worthy FG adaptation. The 1936 version has the edge.
 

Jeffbert

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Trouble for two (1936) based on The Suicide Club; has Prince Florizel (Robert Montgomery) bored and out looking for adventure, Has companion, Colonel Geraldine (Frank Morgan, better known for his role as the man behind the curtain; whom you are to ignore) leave the kingdom & travel to London. There, they encounter Clive Barnley (Louis Hayward), and become intrigued by his insistence that they join him in eating some cream tarts. The film makes it seem strange or silly, and when pressed, he reveals that he is desirous of ending his life. They feign a similar desire, and follow him to the suicide club. About a dozen men and one women are dealt cards, the one receiving the Ace of Clubs is assigned the deed; the one with the Ace of Spades, is the one to whom the deed is done. These are prominent men who have become ruined in one way or another, & dare not do away with themselves, for the shame it would bring upon their names, etc. So, the club is a way to eliminate themselves without the stigma of suicide.

I read R. L. Stevenson's New Arabian Nights years ago, after buying a cd filled with classic literature. I do not recall if there was any romantic element in this story, but I doubt it. Rosalind Russell is the women to whom the prince is betrothed, and she too, is mixed up with the club. Nice, light film, with drama, romance, and a dash of humor.


The Devil-Doll (1936) Paul Lavond (Lionel Barrymore) framed and sent to Devil's Island escapes and seeks vengeance against his three ex-business associates. the man who escaped with him, Marcel (Henry B. Walthall) had been working on a process to reduce living things to a fraction of their original size, believing that this is the only solution to the food shortage. So, they reach the home of Marcel's wife, Malita (Rafaela Ottiano), who has been continuing his experiments. Marcel dies, and Lavond (silent 'd') sees how he can get revenge using this science, though he believes it to be horrible.

Lavond has a mother & daughter; the latter Lorraine (Maureen O'Sullivan; more famous as 'Jane') had grown up hating him, because of the crime, so when he returns to Paris, he lets his mother in on his secret; that he is going around as an elderly woman, a doll-maker, by trade. But those dolls are humans, not only reduced to the size of Barbie, Ken, & the original G.I. Joe, but have no will of their own; in fact, Lavon controls them by mere thought.

I like Lionel Barrymore, & have seen many of his films; probably starting with his role in Its a Wonderful Life.

The film is good enough for me to have watched it several times; though, I guess that is not saying much. :giggle:


The House of Usher (1960) This and the other two were leftovers from October. I was unsure that I wanted to see this again, as I have seen it too many time to count. But, after running Ben M's intro, I just let it play. Other than Price, these names are unfamiliar to me.

Wikipedia's listing for the cast
Wow! only 4!

Roderick is convinced that he must not allow his bloodline to continue, believing the Ushers are cursed. His sister, Madeline, had recently returned from Boston, where she had met and fallen in love with Philip Winthrop. Philip has now come to the house seeking his bride. Roderick desperately tries to convince him that his sister is too ill to leave the house. Failing that, he begins to tell him about the wretchedness of his ancestors, and his certainty that the entire family is cursed. Philip will not be dissuaded.

the 1st of seven collaborations between Price and Roger Corman. I still have P&P on the DVR; though I doubt I will watch it anytime soon.
 

AlexH

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Iron Man 2 (2011)
I found out Mickey Rourke was in an Iron Man film and couldn't remember seeing him in one. That's because I thought I'd seen Iron Man 2, but I hadn't!

It was the best of the three Iron Man films, and I didn't realise it was Black Widow's film debut either. I haven't felt like watching films recently, but Iron Man 2 felt like a great form of escapism, with good action and well-placed humour. The villains were good and not OTT. Now to catch up on Thor and The Incredible Hulk, the only two other Marvel Cinematic Universe films I missed. I hope Black Widow and Wonder Woman 1984 make it to cinema screens this year. Some film releases have been put back over a year.
 

hitmouse

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Lemmy. Interesting documentary on the Motorhead lead. Unusual character who comes across as intelligent, insightful and quite nice.
 

HanaBi

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The Sixth Sense (1999) - Bruce Willis (Malcolm Crowe) and Haley Joel Osment (Cole Sear)

A young precocious boy has the ability to "see dead people", even to the point of communicating with them. Crowe is the child psychologist asked by the boy's mother to try and help Cole as she is at her wit's end trying to cope with her son's social detachment, mood swings, the bullying he suffers at school, coupled with the random poltergeist activity in her own home!

Crowe was shot in the stomach by a patient he failed at curing a year previously, but seems to have made a recovery. But ever since then he too has felt detached from society and especially from his wife, who seems to be more interested in dating a coworker behind his back. So both man and boy have some emotional connection, as well as their own closely guarded secrets that only unravel in the final stanza.

The twist ending was very well done, and certainly came as a surprise. But the problem with twist endings is that when you've seen the film once you know what's coming - very much like the jaw-drop twist in "The Usual Suspects".

However, both films are very well written with some excellent well paced scenes and admirable acting. And this film in particular sees Willis not as an action hero for a change, but just an ordinary man doing ordinary things in his life, and he plays the role perfectly.

But the real star of the film is 9 year old Osment, who not only has to recite his many many lines, but also has to add emotion, pathos and all the other acting facets to make the character truly believable.

Despite the subject matter - ghosts and poltergeists - this isn't quite a horror film, or a thriller or even a drama, but a bit of a cocktail of all three with just enough edge to keep you enthralled.

I also like the boy's surname, "Sear", which somehow suits his 6th sense abilities to a tee.

5/5
 

CupofJoe

some medals you wear on your heart not your sleeve
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Ocean's Movie Trilogy [Eleven, Twelve & Thirteen].
Wouldn't usually watch a modern Hollywood heist movie, but I've got a lot of time on my hands.
Slick dialogue, well written and well-acted, looks great [like "real" used to] and as gloriously empty but sweet and tasty as cotton candy.
They are all utterly implausible but that doesn't matter. You are along for how the ride looks and feels, not the story being told.
Eleven is the best of the three and Twelve the weakest.
Oddly I now want to see Ocean's Eight...
 

CupofJoe

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Lemmy. Interesting documentary on the Motorhead lead. Unusual character who comes across as intelligent, insightful and quite nice.
Loved this too. Was lucky enough to see Motörhead back in the day... It wasn't so much music as audio combat between the band, Lemmy and the audience. I loved it.
 

biodroid

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Black Christmas - One of the worst movies ever made.
1917 - Pretty good movie, sad in places and somehow it looks like 1 continuous shot for the whole movie.
Don't Let Go - Same producers as Black Christmas but is a lot better than it, I enjoyed it despite the poor reviews.
Midway - A very different movie for Roland Emmerich, and it was quite good, just a bit overacted in some places.
 

AlexH

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Iron Man 2 seems to have got me watching films again, and I signed up for a free trial of MUBI, which has 30 films available to stream at any one time, each for 30 days. I've watched three so far, and they couldn't really be more different than Iron Man 2, though there are similarities.

Bacurau (2019)
I'm a bit speechless after just finishing Bacurau. Set in the near future, a strange UFO-like drone hovers over a Brazilian village that's disappeared from Google Maps. A bullet-ridden water tanker drives into the village with water leaking out through the bullet holes. You're best not knowing much more about this film. It's like a cross between Parasite and Westworld. Violent, and not as good as either, but well worth a watch.

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)
Slow-burning French drama/romance about a female painter commissioned to paint a Lady without the Lady knowing she's being painted, set on an isolated island in the 18th century. It was surprisingly tense at times, and I loved the ending(s).

Neighbouring Sounds (2012)
I think this was by the same director as Bacurau, but Neighbouring Sounds was a bit dull. People's lives on a Brazilian street. There's car crime. Some security guards turn up to monitor the street overnight. Nothing much changes. Exciting ending scene, too little too late, and then the film suddenly ends.
 

Randy M.

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Captain Kronos, Vampire Hunter (1972) dir. Brian Clemens; starring Horst Janson, John Carson, Caroline Munro

Hammer production pairing Brian Clemens (first of only two listings in IMDB as director, the other a TV episode) and Laurie Johnson (music), both of whom contributed to the panache of the TV show, The Avengers. Clemens was known as a writer for TV and movies but here shows himself a capable director with smart, efficient use of the camera and framing of scenes. Janson is better in the title role than I'd remembered from watching this maybe 40 years ago (yeesh). In the spirit of, it ain't arrogance if you can back it up, he's a master swordsman and know-it-all about vampires and how to hunt and kill them; a very '70s superhero, of the cooler-than-thou variety. Carson steals several scenes as Kronos' hunchback assistant and all-around expert on vampirism among other things, and Munro is as sexy as she always was with indications she would be a capable actress in roles not requiring sexiness, though little indication she could turn it off.

Kronos is summoned by an old friend to a village where young women are growing old and dying. Along the way she saves Munro from the stocks, sentenced to them for dancing on the Sabbath. After several more deaths and much investigation, the source of the vampirism seems to reside in the estate of the Durwards. Janson, Carson and Munro -- more precisely, their characters -- invade the estate and seek the secret of the Durward family.

Meant as first in a series, this wasn't released in the U.S. until 1974. I recall it being popular, but maybe Hammer's money problems were too much to overcome by that time and so, no more. Too bad. This really is an entertaining movie, not great, but smartly directed and well-acted, a pretty good diversion right now.

Randy M.
 

Jeffbert

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Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (1972) Based on the popular manga, this tells the story of an ex-executioner :giggle: who had been framed for conspiring against the Shogunate, and who, simply refused to go along with the tradition and expectation that he should slit his belly and die. So, he resists, and taking his son, goes on a journey to avenge the murder of his wife. He kills many who were out to get him.

the 1st of 6 films, 4 of which were on TCM recently.

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx (1972) the next film in the series, essentially, more of the same. Ogami Ito takes a contract to kill a guy who intends to ruin the business of a certain town, and is, thus guarded by official samurai. along the way, Retsudo, the series' villain, hires a band of female assassins to kill Ogami, because he had sworn not to assault him, if he defeated Retsudo's best swordsman, which he did.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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A Honest-To-Gosh Double Feature Double Feature, Courtesy Of A Low Budget Florida Filmmaker

(You could have seen both of these flicks on the same bill if you happened to be at a drive-in the American South at the right time, I believe.)

Death Curse of Tartu (1966)

Some guy acting all Indiana Jones-ish is wandering around in a cave, sees this pretty nifty, if goofy, sarcophagus with a statue of a lizard on it, gets killed by Tartu, our four-hundred-year-old witch doctor zombie. Zombie hand flips through some sheets of parchment the guy had rolled up, and they turn out to be the movie's opening titles! That took me by surprise. The rest of the film follows some science guy and his better half, along with some young folks to dance, make out, and listen to lousy pop music. In a nutshell, Tartu objects to having his tomb disturbed, and has the power to turn into various animals to kill these folks off one by one. Sometimes he's an ordinary guy in old-time Native American clothing of the Hollywood kind, sometimes he a white-painted, skull-faced zombie. Moves at a pretty slow pace most of the time. Add in poor acting and a bombastic soundtrack and you've got an offbeat but mediocre cheapskate scare flick.

Sting of Death (1966)

Same minimally talented actors, same inane dialogue, same surprisingly decent cinematography, same nice location shooting in the Everglades. The resemblance ends there, as this one has a much nuttier plot. We see our monster -- guy in a wet suit and swim fins, covered with mud and slime, with weird rope-like tendril things hanging all over him -- attack a woman. After the opening credits, we meet a science guy, his daughter, her boyfriend, and a bunch of her sorority sisters. There's also Egon, a slightly deformed fellow who is very, very obviously the monster. Some other college kids show up and dance to "Do the Jellyfish," sung by Neil Sedaka at the nadir of his career. (See below.) They also make fun of Egon. Egon-as-monster shows up without anybody noticing him, and the killings begin. It turns out he has his own secret lab in a cave reached by swimming underwater, where he has not only grown jellyfish to gigantic size and trained them (they look like multi-colored balloons) but he can also turn himself into the Amazing Jellyfish Man (the aforementioned monster, but with a big plastic bag over his head.) He was doing all this because Science Guy's daughter was the only person nice to him, so he wanted to carry her off as the Bride of the Monster. Add in eye-blazing color photography and a weird mid-1960's sensibility, where the young women are as likely to wear white gloves as bikinis, and you have quite an experience.


 

Jeffbert

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A Honest-To-Gosh Double Feature Double Feature, Courtesy Of A Low Budget Florida Filmmaker

(You could have seen both of these flicks on the same bill if you happened to be at a drive-in the American South at the right time, I believe.)

Death Curse of Tartu (1966)

Some guy acting all Indiana Jones-ish is wandering around in a cave, sees this pretty nifty, if goofy, sarcophagus with a statue of a lizard on it, gets killed by Tartu, our four-hundred-year-old witch doctor zombie. Zombie hand flips through some sheets of parchment the guy had rolled up, and they turn out to be the movie's opening titles! That took me by surprise. The rest of the film follows some science guy and his better half, along with some young folks to dance, make out, and listen to lousy pop music. In a nutshell, Tartu objects to having his tomb disturbed, and has the power to turn into various animals to kill these folks off one by one. Sometimes he's an ordinary guy in old-time Native American clothing of the Hollywood kind, sometimes he a white-painted, skull-faced zombie. Moves at a pretty slow pace most of the time. Add in poor acting and a bombastic soundtrack and you've got an offbeat but mediocre cheapskate scare flick.
I have seen this! The thing could not be killed, but by natural forces, as I recall. :LOL: Thanks, Victoria Silverwolf! I was wanting to remember the title.


Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart to Hades (1972) This is where the baby cart shows its DB-5-like features. Among them the arrow deflecting shield & the guns, capable of rapid fire.
Lone Wolf and Cub, Baby Cart to Hades, 11521.jpg

the wheel hubs also sprout blades, for cutting off legs. Various other blades are concealed in the handle.

The plot: on his travels to nowhere in particular, he takes a room in a hotel, into which a young woman hides. She had been sold to a brothel, and was not quite content with the life that would yield. Her owner, tried to force himself on her, and she bit off his tongue, killing him.

So, the madam of the brothel demanded her return, but Ogami Ittoo refused. He even endured the torture that was intended for her.

Not quite relevant; true, but interesting anyway. So, the usual dozens of minions are sent out to kill him, & naturally, he kills them.
 
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