What was the last movie you saw?

Jeffbert

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TALES OF THE RAT FINK (2006) A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT ED ROTH, WHO designed & built custom cars, but also drew weird creatures and weirder cars for T-shirts & posters.


DEAD SPACE: DOWNFALL (2008) animated sci-fi/horror film


DEAD SPACE: AFTERMATH (2011) sequel to the above. both have action plot, etc. Apparently based on games.


Criss Cross (1949) What an ending! Definite Noir! Steve Thompson (Burt Lancaster) is foolishly associating with Anna (Yvonne De Carlo), his ex-wife, but who is now married to Slim Dundee (Dan Duryea) a gangster-type. So, to get out of trouble, he says he has a plan to rob an armored car. Slim dismisses it immediately, saying it is impossible. ST states that it will be an inside job, & as he drives an armored car, he knows how to do it. It seems to me that he had already succeeded in getting off the hook, so why go further? Maybe I missed something.

Supporting cast includes Alan Napier (who goes on to be Bruce Wayne's butler, Alfred) as Finchley, the mastermind, whom they consulted just to be sure. Percy Helton as Frank the bartender, who I am certain would eventually invent the silent explosive "nitro whisperin" on an episode of Get Smart.


Berlin Express (1948) Noir Alley; about a meeting between big-shots intending to reunify Germany. Though I am thinking that I must have misunderstood what Paul Lucas' character was saying, because it seems that was the last thing anyone wanted at the time. Robert Lindley (Robert Ryan) on a train going from one post war Germany city to another, by chance meets Dr. Bernhardt (Paul Lukas), a peace activist who is the target of assassins.

Tense drama, as authorities aided by most of the people who met Dr. Bernhardt (on the train) search the ruins for clues to his whereabouts. Those opposed to the peace conference had abducted him.


Sea of Grass (1947) Not the usual Tracy & Hepburn film, but a rather intense drama in which T is a tough no-nonsense cattle baron type, & H is his bride to be, who had no idea the kind of man he was. T does some dirty underhanded things to discourage homesteaders from intruding upon the Govt. land he, and other cattlemen use for grazing. H produces a daughter, then, in disgust, goes to the big city and has an affair with Melvyn Douglas; 9 months later a son is born. T does not even suspect, or, perhaps is in denial that MD is the father.

the cook's voice indicated that he was the guy from Green Acres & Petticoat Junction. I seem more or just as inclined to recognize voices as faces, & it was over 40 years ago, last time I saw Green Acres. Edgar Buchanan as Jeff, the ranch's cook.
 

REBerg

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Entertaining, although I find myself wondering how Leia and Han could have had such an unattractive offspring.
 

Parson

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker as well. I liked it very well.
 

AstroZon

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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (2019) D. Quentin Tarantino, Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt

It has its moments, and it's almost 2 movies: one with DiCaprio and another with Pitt. But ultimately I found it strange that Tarantino decided to rewrite history al la Forrest Gump. The ending is pure Tarantino - over the top and unnecessary.
 

Randy M.

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Green for Danger (1946), dir. Sidney Gillat, starring Alastair Sim, Leo Genn, Sally Gray, Trevor Howard

Based on the novel by Christianna Brand, Sim plays Inspector Cockrill and helps confirm my impression that 1940s-'50s British-made movies are always better for his presence, this mystery deals with why a man is murdered on the surgical table. The narrow list of the suspects consists of two doctors and three nurses.

Set in 1944, the atmosphere of menace is introduced immediately by the sound of V1 rockets passing overhead, most on their way to London, but one lands in this little town and initiates events by hurting the postman.

I haven't seen all that many of Sim's movies, but he's one of those actors that seems to be working at a different level from those around him, almost like a character from a different comedic movie transferred into a more conventional melodrama. Even so Trevor Howard and Leo Genn keep up quite well, Sally Gray is convincing as the level-headed love interest for the two men, and Megs Jenkins at times seems a bit like she followed Sim from that other production, in a good way.

If you like '40s black & white movies, this is a fun one.
 

dask

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White Christmas (1954) with Bing Crosby and directed by Michael Curtiz (Casablanca). Sort of the flipside to Holiday Inn since Irving Berlin's seminal classic plays such an important part in each. Pretty good story of post-war show business with great Irving Berlin songs and eye catching choreography. Vera-Ellen is stunning in her skimpy costumes. The part of the movie I dislike the most however is extremely annoying misunderstanding between Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney. It gets resolved at the end but only for Clooney and the audience. Poor Bing never really knows what he did to upset her or why Clooney had a change of heart. Dean Jagger pretty much steels the show as the retired Two Star General.
 

Vince W

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Scrooged (1988). A surprisingly well done film with some rather scary moments for the younger viewers. Murray is no Alastair Sim but it's probably my third favourite version following Scrooge and A Muppet Christmas Carol.
 

Starbeast

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TALES OF THE RAT FINK (2006) A DOCUMENTARY ABOUT ED ROTH, WHO designed & built custom cars, but also drew weird creatures and weirder cars for T-shirts & posters.
I'm a tremendous fan of his.



Black Christmas (1974) - I finally got my chance to see this cult classic, horror flick. And what a time to watch it too (a few days ago). Jeepers creepers was it disturbing. Excellent for it's genre, even for today.

The Love Guru (2008) - In my own defense, your honor. "I did not want to see this movie, ever." However, a friend wanted to watch it because he likes the actor MIKE MYERS (as do I). But unfortunately he was unaware this movie had a multitude of bad reviews. Curiosity got the better of me, and I agreed to watch it.

I am now certain, I never want to see that film again.

Dead Snow 2: Red vs Dead (2014) - If you enjoyed the first movie, like I did, you'll have a great time with this sequel. This movie picks up right where the first film left off. Fantastic zombie movie.

It's a Spongebob Christmas (2012) - One of my favorite animated holiday treats. I've watched this special episode many times this month (many times in the past too). Outstanding stop-motion animation. (not a cartoon)

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Jeffbert

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Green for Danger (1946), dir. Sidney Gillat, starring Alastair Sim, Leo Genn, Sally Gray, Trevor Howard

Based on the novel by Christianna Brand, Sim plays Inspector Cockrill and helps confirm my impression that 1940s-'50s British-made movies are always better for his presence, this mystery deals with why a man is murdered on the surgical table. The narrow list of the suspects consists of two doctors and three nurses.

Set in 1944, the atmosphere of menace is introduced immediately by the sound of V1 rockets passing overhead, most on their way to London, but one lands in this little town and initiates events by hurting the postman.

I haven't seen all that many of Sim's movies, but he's one of those actors that seems to be working at a different level from those around him, almost like a character from a different comedic movie transferred into a more conventional melodrama. Even so Trevor Howard and Leo Genn keep up quite well, Sally Gray is convincing as the level-headed love interest for the two men, and Megs Jenkins at times seems a bit like she followed Sim from that other production, in a good way.

If you like '40s black & white movies, this is a fun one.
Oh, I remember that film, & that the title referred to the compressed gas tanks used during surgery. As I recall, green was for oxygen. I could say more, but rather recommend watching it, as it is very good! Thanks for the post, Randy M!

The Maltese Falcon (1931) Ricardo Cortez as Sam Spade, while Bogart was working as supporting roles. If not for the Noir version, this one seems to me that it stands up rather well. Some scenes seemed to have their scripts directly re used in the Noir version.

TCM is running films followed by their remakes, and I just happened to be viewing the schedule for the next few days.

Anyway, definitely pre-code, & it shows. Ruth Wonderly (Bebe Daniels) has a bath, is stripped searched by Spade. Plenty of suggestive dialog. Naughty, naughty!

The biggest difference I could see, other than the ending, was the inactivity of Wilmer Cook (Dwight Frye). He rarely speaks, and makes no threatening gestures toward anyone. No fewer than 3, count 'em, 3 Frankenstein films, & several other horrors. But, because this guy never took off his cap, & kept his collar up, I could hardly see his face.:unsure: The guy who portrays Dr. Joel Cairo (Otto Matieson), was the least familiar to me; he died just one year after this film. :cry: He was just creepy enough. Gutman (Dudley Digges) out lived him considerably, & looking at his wiki page, he appeared in a few other films I had seen, but I still cannot recall him. I think I had seen the guys who played the cops elsewhere, but this was not the 1st time I saw this film. OMG! Detective Sergeant Tom Polhaus (J. Farrell MacDonald) has got a massive filmography! I know I have seen him elsewhere!


Now to watch the Noir version, while this one is still fresh in memory!
 

Jeffbert

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The Maltese Falcon (1941) Not the least bit boring, after seeing the 1931 version just a few hours earlier. But, I am retired, so, no doubt, that makes a difference. As far as plot goes, Wilmer is far more active in this version, than in the 1931, Spade uses different slang to suggest a homosexual relationship between Gutman & Wilmer; and because of the far greater / more frequent conflict between Spade and Wilmer, there is a likewise far more frequent use of derogatory language about the two.

This version ends with everybody leaving Spade's apartment; while the 1931 version goes on for at least another 5 minutes. Spade visiting Wonderly/ O'Shaughnessy in jail, and a few other scenes. I think the better ending is in this version. Both versions have all the required elements of Noir, but, it seems anything earlier than the '40s, does not qualify. The Femme Fatale, the bad guys, the good guys, the hero/protagonist, caught between them, etc. , they are all in both. Sad that Muller will never do the 1931 version; he would have a ton of details to share.

There are far more familiar faces here, than in the 1931 version, too many to even be fair mentioning just a few. So, I will suffice with 2. I believe this was Greenstreet's 1st film. It is interesting to note that his name appeared on the 2nd frame of cast members; while in The Mask of Dimetrios (see page 841), Greenstreet's name is above Lorre's, whose name was among the top 4, here.

If not for my admiring of Bogart in his prime, I would say both versions are about equal in their quality. This version is better in some regards, while the earlier one has its own merits, etc.
 

AstroZon

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I have a Special Edition DVD of the Maltese Falcon with 3 complete films: the 1931 version with Ricardo Cortez, a 1936 version called Satan Met a Lady with Warren William and Bette Davis, and the 1941 classic with Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre, & Sydney Greenstreet. I like the 1931 version too, but the 1941 version just gets everything right: the mood, the mystery, the fast dialog, and especially the acting. BTW, Satan Met a Lady isn't worth watching.
 

AstroZon

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Maigret: Little Pigs Without Tails (2004) Season 8, Bruno Cremer (French TV) (I know it's not a movie, but it's well produced and runs about 100 minutes.) Usually when a television series runs long, it loses its impact, recycles plots, or totally jumps the shark. So I was quite surprised to find Maigret still quite good in Season 8. Little Pigs Without Tails (Les Petits Cochons Sans Queue) is my favorite from this season.

Paris Police Commissaire Jules Maigret (Bruno Cremer) is finishing up an official duty in a small seaside town. The local police commissioner doesn't like such a heavyweight official around and is quite happy to see Maigret return to Paris. However while packing, Maigret is approached by the hotel maid who asks him if he'd speak to her friend who is in some kind of trouble. He agrees and the maid brings her friend, Germaine Leblanc, into his room. She states that her husband is missing. He delays his departure a few hours to investigate and realizes that there's more to the matter than it seemed. Of course, he extends his stay much to the frustration of the local police commissioner.

What makes this episode especially good is the report between Maigret and Ms. Leblanc. They match wits throughout the episode as she tries to keep him from digging too deep. At one point, she's driving a red Ford Edsel convertible when Maigret comments on what a nice car it is. She responds to the much older Maigret that it's her husband's, but she, "prefers newer models." I don't even speak French, but still I know a double entendre when I hear one.
 

Jeffbert

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I have a Special Edition DVD of the Maltese Falcon with 3 complete films: the 1931 version with Ricardo Cortez, a 1936 version called Satan Met a Lady with Warren William and Bette Davis, and the 1941 classic with Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre, & Sydney Greenstreet. I like the 1931 version too, but the 1941 version just gets everything right: the mood, the mystery, the fast dialog, and especially the acting. BTW, Satan Met a Lady isn't worth watching.
I know I saw Satan Met a Lady, as Warren William is one of my favorite actors. I do not remember it, though.

Yes, Greenstreet & Lorre whether by intention or chance, had a chemistry that worked very well & resulted in an additional 8 or 9 films. I also like Barton MacLane, & being retired, would look through TCM's daily schedule searching for supporting actors. I suppose I started doing this because of a WB cartoon, depicting many Hollywood celebs, including Bogart. I knew little if anything about most of them, but have seen films with many since then.

Oh, just noticed the poster on the wiki page, deceptively shows Bogart in a threatening pose holding the 2 .45s had had taken for E. Cook, Jr. I heard something about a book titled "Tough Without a Gun: The Life and Extraordinary Afterlife of Humphrey Bogart" * sure enough, there it is on Amazon. Anyway, this film earns that title, despite the poster.
 

Toby Frost

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Was Ed Roth anything to do with Rob Zombie? Their art styles seem very similar.

I've been watching The Fellowship of the Ring again. It's one of those films that I know better from memes and parodies than I do from the film itself. But none of those have weakened it, which is surely a sign of quality. The story is a bit of a mess (obviously, it's part of a longer story) but it convinces, and that's the important thing. Still very good indeed.
 

IAmTR

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Star Wars episode 9. It was fun but kinda crappy too. Still better than that awful The Force Awakens. But this movie was exactly what it was: JJ Abrams cramming two movies into one because he didn't direct the last one. This trilogy was such a mess. Shame on Disney and Kathleen Kennedy for being so careless with one of the biggest and most beloved brands in cinematic history.
 

AstroZon

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Jeffbert

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The Flying Guillotine (1975) :LOL: The Emperor decides he needs an elite group of assassins because it is much easier to simply kill your enemies than it is to bring them to trail. So, they invent this thing that is thrown like a Frisbee, lands on the victim's head, and with a quick tug on the attached cord, removes the head with a camera shutter-like action.

But after so many successful 'executions' the Emperor decides that some of the assassins themselves, have turned against him.

The whole idea seems absurd, as the thing must weigh about 5 pounds at the least, yet, it 'flies' just as easily as a Frisbee. The idea of stopping it midair directly above the target/victim dropping upon / around his head, etc. is hilarious.

I recall seeing a documentary about such a weapon, and how it would / wouldn't work.


Girls Und Panzer Der Film (2015) Another absurd film; this time delicate high school and middle school girls fight battles in WWII tanks. They drive through the city destroying buildings and businesses while parents and families sit in bleachers watching the action on huge video screens. Nobody is even injured, much less killed. :unsure: The tanks are rendered rather well, but glimpses of details are very brief. So, this one school which is among several competing was to win the game, and save it from closing. But the girls learned the hard way that a verbal agreement is only worth the paper its printed on. So, they will close the school anyway. One chance is to defeat the college team's 30 tanks with their 8. Fortunately, all the other High School teams join to even the odds.
 
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