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What was the last movie you saw?

Happy Joe

Apprentice Geezer
Joined
Feb 9, 2007
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570
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Colorado, U.S.A.
The Blob (1958) was on (Son of) Svengoolie (Chicago-ites will know) last night; actually managed to watch the first 15-20 minutes before I turned it off... To re read McCaffrey 's; The White Dragon...

Enjoy!
 

Judderman

The Iceman cometh
Joined
Apr 20, 2010
Messages
1,065
Hotel Mumbai which is at the cinema at the moment is a superb film. It is shocking as is based on a terrorist attack, but is brilliantly made into a suspenseful and thrilling action,

The Aftermath is a good post world war period piece.
 

Parson

This world is not my home
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Oct 11, 2006
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Iowa
if a person not familiar and up to date with most of the movies in the Marvel universe they could easily get lost/confused.
This was me. I kept going who? what? why? And then there were about half a dozen times that roughly 1/3 of the packed house laughed where I could see nothing funny. --- I'm guessing it was a type of inside joke.

Love the new Thor
I found "new Thor" interesting and probably a bit too pron to show his emotions. My 35 year old daughter...HATED the New Thor, I think partly because his body morphed into something not very sexy.
 

Boneman

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Nov 4, 2008
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5,241
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Working with the Bare Bones of talent
I rode the bandwagon right into Avengers: Endgame. It was worth it.


Ditto... really enjoyed it. One tiny, tiny thing (someone put me right on this, if I'm mistaken: SPOILER How could Captain America appear at the end of the film in the same timeline he'd been sent back too? There were loads of discussions about this when they were talking about how time-travel worked, surely he had to go back to a different timeline, so he wouldn't appear in the one he left, no?
 

Parson

This world is not my home
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@Boneman they did say: It will be 5 seconds for us, but however long it takes for him. I understood that to mean that he would pop back into the original timeline after living his life in the alternate one. I had more of a problem in the fact that he did not return to the exact spot and instead was sitting looking over the lake.
 

Jeffbert

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
789
M (19514) NOIR ALLEY presentation. Fairly good remake, taking the setting to a large U.S. city and a contemporary time. Lang was not the least bit happy about this remake, but the other guy owned the rights. The guy who played the killer just does not compare with Lorre, though. I recognized only a few names in the cast. HUAC was already after the director and some others involved with this film. Sad that it fared poorly in the theaters.

So, a key difference
was that the killer had a little girl with him when the crooks found him. Made the tension higher, because the viewer is worried about what the guy might do to the kid.

I never even knew there was a remake, until I programmed my DVR a week before this was on.

Return to Glennascaul (1951) is a very short eerie ghost story. Orson Welles stars as a motorist who gives a lift to two women. He drives the to the title place, they invite him in for tea. He asks if he may smoke, they consent, and commenting on the design of his lighter, he passes it around, and it is left on the mantle. He says goodbye, leaves 10 minutes later, he realizes he left his lighter there.

Now, for the spooky part:
Upon returning, he finds the place overrun with weeds, as though it had been abandoned for ten years.

Hollow Triumph (1948) John Muller (Paul Henreid) is a newly released ex-con, whose old gang welcomes his return. Immediately, he plans to hit a gambling house, owned by the most prominent gang in the area. His men try to dissuade him, but he is intent. So, they steal the money from the cashier, but the guy who was to shut off the lights, is confronted by a man, & the two fight. The crooks attempt to escape, but two are killed or caught. only 3 escape. Now they must hide. So, PH just happens to come across a man Dr. Victor Emil Bartok (Paul Henreid), who obviously resembles him. He carefully plots to assume the other guy's identity.
If I did not know better, I would think this was on The Twilight Zone, because after killing his look-alike, and assuming his identity, his only living henchman comes to tell him that the gang that had been pursuing them, had been killed or arrested. :ROFLMAO: If that were not enough, Dr. Bartok had a gambling debt to the local illegal gambling house.

When the guy tries to board an ocean liner, to win the love of Bartok's woman, who realized he was a fake, the local gang confronts him, & he ends up dying, as the ship leave the port.
 

Starbeast

Benevolent Galaxy Being
Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Messages
4,905
Location
Illinois
52130

Cross of Iron (1977) I haven't seen this great movie in a long time. It's still a thought-provoking, and outstanding anti-war film. This movie features an awesome cast, with superb directing by SAM PECKINPAH. The story is about German soldiers battling in 1943, at the Russian front.

52127

The Last Wave (1977) Another film I haven't seen in a while, and still enjoy watching. Set in Australia, it's about a lawyer investigating a simple murder case, who discovers far more than he could imagine. For me, this is an astonishing film by PETER WEIR, with a great cast, and eerie electronic music score.


52131

Captain Marvel (2019) For this comic book fan, it's Marvelously tremendous. Onward to Avengers: Endgame Excelsior!
 

Jeffbert

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
789
AMERICAN SCARY (2006), a documentary on the late night TV horror film hosts, such as Elvira & Vampira. :LOL: Good ol' Prime!
 
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Starbeast

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Mar 11, 2010
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Illinois
52145


Avengers: Endgame (2019) This is (so far) the best comic book tale on the big screen. I loved it.
 

Randy M.

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Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
1,355
AMERICAN SCARY (2006), a documentary on the late night TV horror film hosts, such as Elvira & Vampira. :LOL: Good ol' Prime!
That looks like fun, and I see they included one from my locality. Dr. E. Nick Witty was a Saturday staple when I was a kid. He hosted Monster Movie Matinee, my introduction to Frankenstein (1931), Dracula (1931), The Creature from the Black Lagoon, The Thing (From Another World), Them and a whole lot of other ones. All you ever saw of him was his arm and a hand with long nails, but Alan Milair, who played him, had a beautiful baritone voice that he knew how to use, and a willing foil in Epal, played by Bill Lape (get it, Epal?). The set became more and more elaborate over the years, including some lab equipment and what not, and Milair and Lape started to have little story lines develop from week to week, at least a few of which contributed to Epal's growing number of scars.

Given the events of the late '60s, early '70s it's hard to think as that era as more innocent times and yet, there you go.

Randy M.
 

Jeffbert

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Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
789
After watching AMERICAN SCARY, Prime showed suggestions, including one all about D.C.' host, Count Gore DeVol, who also hosted the weekday afternoons kiddie cartoon time. We had just bought a COLOR TV, & it even got UHF with fairly good reception! My 1st exposure to Speed Racer, Ultraman, & others was on channel 20. But, 26 was the PBS channel and had mostly boring content, with few exceptions, one of which was MPFC! & now, for something completely different:

Raffles (1939) The Amateur Cracksman, A.J. Raffles (David Niven) is retired from burglary, when, suddenly, his friend comes along and has a need for £1k, else he goes to jail. Raffles decides to make one more job, and steal a necklace from a rich woman, whom he personally knows. But, the local Scotland Yard guy, has several items of evidence, though far from conclusive, that suggest Raffles is the Amateur Cracksman.

Light humor throughout, very entertaining.


Lady Snowblood (1973) A young couple is attacked by a gang, the husband is murdered, the wife, raped. She takes revenge on one gang member, and is imprisoned. she goes wild, like an animal in heat, hoping to give birth to a son, whose sole purpose in life, is to avenge her. But, she brings forth a daughter, instead. An abundance of blood spraying from those she kills follows.
 

Jeffbert

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Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
789
EVERY OTHER DAY IS HALLOWEEN (2009) Capt. 20, the afternoon kids' cartoon host, Bozo the clown, & of course, Count Gore DeVol, host of Saturday night's Creature Feature is the subject. Dick Dyszel is the man behind all these characters. I never knew of him, until I was at least 12, when our dad replaced our old gray scale TV with a color TV, whose most important feature was that it got UHF channels good enough to watch. :D Capt. 20 modeled himself on Mr. Spock, and had these awful 'Vulcan'-type fake ears. They were huge. But, I do not remember them! As I recall, he wore a silver-type spacesuit material costume. What he was shown wearing on this program just did not resonate.

While I remember his Count Gore DeVol persona, his Capt. 20 one was my favorite. Speed Racer, Johnny Sokko, Ultaman, Marine Boy, Banana Splits, & I do not recall others. After school TV Vs. homework, which was more important? It depend whom you ask!

So, I just watched Lady Frankenstein at:
Creature Feature Dungeon of horror host Count Gore De Vol

Complete with Count Gore's interruptions, some of which he used to discuss female mad scientists in horror films. Thankfully, these were few.
:love:
So, apparently, there are very many Saturday night TV horror film hosts, as was revealed in AMERICAN SCARY, and in this film, they had a convention, or something like it!
 

Jeffbert

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Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
789
Lady Frankenstein (1971) Joseph Cotten's shame that he was in this, as Dr. F., whose daughter returns from university/medical school, & wants to help daddy with his experiments. After creating a monster using a murderer's brain, the monster breaks free, kills Dr. F., and goes on a rampage. Daughter loves the assistant doctor's mind, but wants to put his brain in the moron servant's body, and have him / them/ it as her lover.

Unless you love these silly films, skip this one.


Escape from Crime (1942) remake of The Picture Snatcher, but w/o James Cagney. The newspaper offers a photographer a large sum, if he can snap a photo of a condemned woman being put to death in the electric chair. The photographer was just recently released from prison.


Woman on the Run (1950) the wife Eleanor Johnson (Ann Sheridan) of a witness Frank Johnson (Ross Elliott) against a murderer is pursued by the gang, which believes she knows her husband's whereabouts. An overly helpful reporter Daniel Legget (Dennis O'Keefe) accompanies when she solves the clues her husband left.
The reporter is actually the Murderer.
I don't remember if this was Noir Alley. :confused:
 

Randy M.

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Mar 7, 2012
Messages
1,355
Escape from Crime (1942) remake of The Picture Snatcher, but w/o James Cagney. The newspaper offers a photographer a large sum, if he can snap a photo of a condemned woman being put to death in the electric chair. The photographer was just recently released from prison.
Interesting. I bet both were inspired by the 1928 case of Ruth Snyder, accused and found guilty of killing her husband. Cameras weren't allowed in the chamber, but a reporter smuggled one in and the resulting picture became a sensation.

Woman on the Run
(1950) the wife Eleanor Johnson (Ann Sheridan) of a witness Frank Johnson (Ross Elliott) against a murderer is pursued by the gang, which believes she knows her husband's whereabouts. An overly helpful reporter Daniel Legget (Dennis O'Keefe) accompanies when she solves the clues her husband left.

I don't remember if this was Noir Alley. :confused:
It was Noir Alley. I saw it last weekend. Really it's a noir crime coating around the nougat of examining marriage as it should be according to then current society. Sheridan is a lot of fun at first, when you can't tell if she cares about her husband or not while she zips off one one-liner after another to the cops and the nosy reporter, the epitome of the tough, able American woman during WWII. Over the course she becomes a post-WWII wife; is there a female version of the word, emasculated? That bit of snark aside, it's a well-done little thriller, smartly scripted and filmed. But I do think if someone were studying social attitudes pre-WWII, during and after, it would make for an informative artifact from the after.

Oh, and this is the 2nd or 3rd film I've seen O'Keefe in and really enjoyed his work. I don't know if he had much range, but in his range he's fun.

Randy M.
 

J Riff

The Ants are my friends..
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Apr 11, 2010
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Sleeping in Lab
The Endless 2019 - well it tries to be a scary movie about a UFO cult, in a weird woodsy place where... um, time loops perpetrated by an invisible creature or something ... have everyone acting culty as all get-out. This movie hangs in, but never really gets anywhere, though lots of ominous music makes it seem like it does. Kinda thing. Some interesting characters keep it from becoming fast-forward material like most other modren 'horror' movies.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

Vegetarian Werewolf
Joined
Dec 9, 2012
Messages
5,859
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Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA
Lady Frankenstein (1971) Joseph Cotten's shame that he was in this, as Dr. F., whose daughter returns from university/medical school, & wants to help daddy with his experiments. After creating a monster using a murderer's brain, the monster breaks free, kills Dr. F., and goes on a rampage. Daughter loves the assistant doctor's mind, but wants to put his brain in the moron servant's body, and have him / them/ it as her lover.

Unless you love these silly films, skip this one.
Count me as one of those who is addicted to these things.

My own review from some years ago:

Lady Frankenstein (1971)

Directed by Mel Welles and Aureliano Luppi (uncredited); written by Dick Randall and Edward Di Lorenzo.

Having recently seen Frankenstein's Daughter (1958), which features no female relative of Frankenstein at all (the title is strictly a metaphor for the monster), as well as Jesse James Meets Frankenstein's Daughter (1966), which actually features Frankenstein's granddaughter, it was refreshing to finally see a film which actually involves Frankenstein's daughter. (In fact, the Italian title for this Spaghetti Gothic is La figlia di Frankenstein.) It seems appropriate that this variation on the Frankenstein theme resembles something created from various bits and pieces, then somehow brought to life. I found it to be more entertaining than I expected.

(Trival conincidence: Not too long ago I happened to hear the Rob Zombie song "Living Dead Girl" on the radio. It began with this sampled quote: "Who is this irresistible creature who has an insatiable love for the dead?" I wondered what this was from, and I was going to ask the smart folks around here, but the IMDB reveals that it is from the trailer for Lady Frankenstein.)

We begin with typical Frankenstein stuff, as some graverobbers deliver their wares to the Baron and his assistant Charles. (As in the Hammer series, Frankenstein is a titled aristocrat. In fact, most of the first part of this film resembles a Hammer movie.) It turns out that Frankenstein needs a body no more than six hours dead to procede with his plan to revive a corpse. Amazingly, the graverobbers do not murder somebody to get the body. Instead, they wait until a condemned murderer is hanged and then grab his body out of the grave. The revival involves transplanting the murderer's heart and brain into another corpse, then raising the body, in typical Universal horror movie style, to the castle's skylight so it can get zapped by lightning.

(A word here on the heart and brain transplantion theme. This movie seems to imply that the heart is literally the seat of emotions, as the brain is the seat of thought. This odd notion reminds me of the movie Doctor Blood's Coffin (1961), where the dead are brought back to life after heart transplants, even one which has been rotting in the grave for quite a long time.)

MAJOR SPOILERS AHEAD

During the lightning-induced revival (a scene which also includes a bunch of bats flying around, I suppose just to make things a little more spooky) the monster gets zapped in the face and starts to burn. This happens just so it will look ugly. The makeup used here reminds me a lot of the kind of thing that used to show up in Famous Monsters of Filmland long ago, where some kid would send in a photograph of himself (nearly always himself, of course) in his homemade monster face. In other words, gruesome but not very professional or convincing. A few minutes after the monster comes to life, it kills Frankenstein. (Charles told him not to use a brain with a damaged hypothalamus, particularly one from a murderer!) Exit Joseph Cotton, who actually makes a pretty good Peter Cushing.

You'll notice that I have not yet mentioned Lady Frankenstein. (Since she's the daughter of a Baron, I suppose the title is appropriate enough.) She's shown up by this time, but doesn't yet play much of a role in the story. Tania Frankenstein (who has a first name which seems rather unlikely to me, given the vaguely 19th Century England setting of this thing; the characters all have names like Jim Turner and Jack Morgan) is played by Italian exploitation actress Rosalbi Nori, under the pseudonym Sara Bay. Nori is strikingly beautiful, and is quite delightful to watch in her Victorian gowns. (Many gentlemen may prefer the two brief scenes where she is wearing nothing.) In particular, her aristocratic profile is a thing of joy. Lady Frankenstein is played as a very intelligent, strong-willed woman, who has just returned from the University with her degree in surgery.

The movie changes from early Hammer horror to later, sexed-up Hammer horror when the monster begins its rampage. The first victims are a couple making out by a stream. Sadly, the man is completely clothed and the woman is stark naked. The female nudity in this movie is extremely gratuitous, and rather out of place, given the PG level of violence. Lady Frankenstein's two nude scenes, it must be admitted, are more relevant to the plot.

As expected, Lady Frankenstein sets out to continue her father's experiments, not only to destroy the monster who is decimating the village, but, in an interesting plot twist, to create the perfect man for herself. She admires Charles for his mind, but prefers a simple-minded but strong and handsome servant for his body. Charles is so smitten with Lady Frankenstein that he agrees to have his brain transplanted into the servant's body. In the movie's kinkiest scene, Lady Frankenstein seduces the servant and has Charles suffocate him with a pillow while she's having sex with him. (Mind you, by this time she is actually married to Charles, and is called Mrs. Marshall by everybody. Poor Charles puts up with a lot for the object of his affections.)

(Remember that thing about the heart transplant that I mentioned? We find out here that it won't be necessary to transplant Charles's heart into his new body, because the servant already has a kind heart!)

Long story short, this all leads up to the final battle between the monster and the new Charles. The movie ends with an scene which reminds me of nothing so much as the old article from National Lampoon "How to Write Good," which suggested that you end your story with "Then they were all hit by a truck." No trucks are involved, but the final fate of Lady Frankenstein is just as sudden and unexpected.

Surprisingly, this movie has some interesting characters (I liked the cynical graverobber Lynch), some sharp dialogue ("On Earth, Man is God."), and some decent acting. Many outdoor scenes are filmed in the snow, adding an interesting touch. Mickey Hargitay, of all people, is pretty much wasted as the police captain investigating the murders, but it's interesting to compare his sanity here compared to his role in Bloody Pit Of Horror (1965). I think you might enjoy spending some time with this lovely and talented Lady.
 

REBerg

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Avengers: Infinity War
Truly a special effects spectacle. Although I've been super-hero saturated for some time, I watched this last night in preparation for taking my grandson to Endgame tomorrow. I thought that the snappy dialogue was more entertaining than the action.
I can't disagree with Thanos. Exterminating only half of the lifeforms threatening the Universe and giving the surviving half another chance seems charitable. It's a dirty job, but somebody has got to step up with a solution. ;)
 

Jeffbert

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Joined
Dec 23, 2011
Messages
789
Isn't that a bit much for Lady Frankenstein? Looks like an entire 8.5 by 11' & then some. :LOL: You must really enjoy tying, Victoria Silverwolf! As for me, with just one hand and arthritic fingers, I keep my posts rather short.

Oh, almost forgot! I recall seeing a film, cannot remember the name, of the Victorian setting, and the place was the dissection room in the university. All men, & somehow, the idea of a female student came up. The Professor said something like the only way a woman enters this room, in feet first. So, I do not know how likely or unlikely it would be for a woman perish the thought! - to be admitted to a medical school, in the era, or late 19th to early 20th centuries.

Passing Fancy (1933) but silent. A Japanese film about a father trying to compete with a much younger guy for a 20 something woman. Not much happens. No killing, no katanas, no shuriken (throwing stars). If this had been a domestic film, I likely would not even have thought about watching it. But I have a thing for foreign language films.
 
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