What was the last movie you saw?

J Riff

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s'MegMeh?
The Atomic Submarine 1959- our sub battles a big UFO under the arctic sea, a one-eyed ET is causing trouble...aaaand guess who wins? All they have to do is convert a torpedo into an ICBM, and blast away with handguns. The FX could be done in a home aquarium but we have seen much worse.
 

Jeffbert

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I finally watched the Mummy 1932 and the Mummy's Hand, want to get to the rest of the series soon (I have seen Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy).

As for Night of the Living Dead,
Johnny: Hey, come on, Barb. Church was this morning. I mean, prayin's for church.

Barbara: I haven't seen you in church lately.

Johnny: Well, there's not much sense in my going to church. Do you remember one time when we were small, we were out here? It was from right over there, I jumped out at you from behind the tree, and Grandpa got all excited, and he shook his fist at me and said, "Boy, you'll be damned to Hell!" Remember that? Right over there.


I watched THE RAVEN and THE COMEDY OF TERRORS.

Both are a nice change of pace from the serious side--the comic antics between Vincent Price and Peter Lorre are especially amusing.

"That woman sir, was my wife."

"Left you huh?"

The latter film was a personal project of screenwriter Richard Matheson and I have to admit, it does have enduring laugh out loud moments for me.


"I am afraid madam he has made his final crossing to that Stygian shore."

"What?"

"He's dead."
Comedy of Terrors was on TCM a few months ago, only the 2nd time I saw it. Wonderful film! Karloff as a senile old man was great. I think this & The Raven essentially showed the old school horror genre actors handing the baton (as in a relay race) to the New. Lorre being the connecting link between them. Though, Karloff continued making horror films well into the 1960s.

A & C meet the Mummy was especially funny with the gag about the pick & the shovel.

The Atomic Submarine (1959) -- I saw this way back during my early years with NF. Apparently, those aliens were the models for the ones on The Simpsons. I cannot recall much other than their physical appearance.

The House of Wax (1953) just watched it a few minutes ago; now watching The P & the P in the PiP! :ROFLMAO: I will switch to full screen after reading my email.

Masque of the Red Death (1964) Price without the so-called 'camp' entertaining, without much if any humor.

Just started House on Haunted Hill (1959); this one, I have seen many times. It never gets old.

Returning to the Pit & the Pendulum, there was a pert of it, that I began watching in the PiP. After going to full screen, & was a bit lost, so I rewound about 10 minutes. Though I had seen the film numerous times, I had completely forgotten that
the doctor and presumed dead Elizabeth were trying to drive Nicholas Medina (Vincent Price) insane. But while they succeeded, their plot backfired, and led to the Pendulum scene.
Thus, it was more entertaining than it otherwise would have been, because that part seemed new.
 

Randy M.

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Jeffbert, I should re-watch some of those. I saw most of them years ago on tv and there's no telling how much was cut for commercials. I did record Theatre of Blood and The Last Man on Earth. I've never seen the latter (first filming of Richard Matheson's I am Legend) and only saw the former once, on tv as a movie of the week so, again, probably chopped a bit (and it co-stars Diana Rigg, so very re-watchable).

Randy M.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Anatomy of a Psycho (1961)

Misleading title, probably meant to cash in on the recent popularity of Anatomy of a Murder and Psycho, for a low budget crime film. Our antihero and his sister were raised by their older brother. Older brother is on death row for killing a guy during a robbery. Antihero freaks out when the execution takes place, plots revenge. It's interesting to note that the revenge is aimed at the sons of the folks he blames for his brother's death. First, he and his juvenile delinquent buddies put on hoods and beat up the son of the district attorney. Next, he goes to a poolside party hosted by the son of the judge, at a luxurious home. (This was filmed at some mansion in Colorado, and the mountain scenery is truly gorgeous, particularly when compared to the gritty look of the rest of the sets. It's a pretty funny scene, too, with young folks all dressed up -- the judge's son objects to the fact that the hero shows up without a tie -- and dancing to both easy listening and rock 'n' roll.) Complicating matters is the fact that the antihero's ex-girlfriend is at the party, having dumped him for the judge's son. (You can tell what kind of a girl she is from the fact that she's the only female at the party in a tight, figure-fitting dress. All the other women at the party are in flouncy dresses. I've never seen so many swirling petticoats in my life.) Anyway, antihero and the judge's son get in a fight. Antihero smashes him into a mirror and sets the house on fire, burning it to the ground. Last of all, antihero frames the son of the guy who witnessed the killing for the murder of one of his hoodlum pals. Adding to his lust for revenge is the fact that the son of the witness is engaged to be married to the antihero's sister. After these violent events, the film settles down into a sedate courtroom drama and a surprisingly quiet denouement. It's a cheap, talky, poorly acted movie, with a few decent scenes.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Lady in Cement (1968)

Frank Sinatra is private eye Tony Rome!

Rome is a Miami-based PI who lives on a houseboat. (Shades of Travis McGee.) One day, while diving for sunken treasure with a buddy, he finds a dead woman with her feet in a block of cement. A big, hulking guy (Dan Blocker) hires him to find a missing woman, who may or may not be the Lady in Cement. (Shades of Farewell, My Lovely.) This gets him mixed up with an alcoholic heiress (Raquel Welch), a crime boss trying to go straight, the son of the crime boss who is not so interested in going straight, go-go dancers, the owner of the go-go club and his bodyguard/boyfriend, cops, and assorted other characters. Fistfights, gunfights, car chases, etc. Nice scenes of Miami in the 1960's. Sinatra looks like he'd rather be hanging out with the Rat Pack than tangling with hoods, and the film is more than a little comic, with lots of wisecracks. It's an OK piece of light entertainment.

Mean Johnny Barrows (1975)

Fred Williamson is Mean Johnny Barrows!

Action star Williamson directs himself for the first time. He's a Vietnam vet who got dishonorably discharged despite winning the Silver Star. It seems that, during a training session with fake land mines, an NCO sets him up to step on a live mine. Only through his training and great caution does he escape alive. Understandably, he punches the NCO, which gets him the discharge. He winds up homeless on the streets of Los Angeles. There's an improvised cameo by Elliot Gould as a homeless guy who calls himself Professor Theodore Rasputin Waterhouse. Williamson eventually gets a lousy job cleaning a gas station, but his boss only gives him twenty-one bucks for a month's work. Meanwhile, two rival Mafia families start a gang war. Williamson eventually gets convinced to accept a job as a hit man for the slightly less evil of the two mob families. (The other one wants to sell dope to minorities. They run their business through a flower shop, and one of them is played by an oddly miscast Roddy McDowell.) After more than an hour of social drama/Mafia drama, it turns into an action flick as Williamson puts on a snazzy white suit and wipes out the rival gang. There's a downbeat ending that brings back Williamson's past. Don't expect pulse-pounding excitement; for most of its length this is a story about the plight of a veteran trying to make his way in civilian life, plus a low-budget variation on The Godfather. Notable for a funky theme song with lyrics about the inability of a vet trying to get a job, with the memorable chorus "peace is hell."
 

Alexa

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Red Sparrow. Not what I was expecting, but rather a good film in the end. I'm not a fan of Jennifer Lawrence, and she was flat yet again, but for this role, it works. The most unbelievable part is her as a prima ballerina. It was like watching a seal in a tutu dance.
I watched it this week-end. Jennifer Lawrence is good playing rebel characters and this movie is no exception. There were moments when it was difficult to watch, like the killing and torture parts. I expected some nudity scenes, but not so explicit. Not recommended for children this one.

I like rebel characters and I really enjoyed the moment when she asked a last time *Aren't you proud of me, my uncle ?*

You really don't believe she was the one dancing, do you ? They were careful not to show her face to close, so I'm pretty sure a real ballerina was dancing.
 

J Riff

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In Search of the Castaways - 1962 Hayley Mills, and I dint remember this one at all, but it has great looking sets and foolishness, a very good uncredited big cat appearance by a leopard or is that a jaguar? and Wilfrid Brambell being eccentric, plus volcanoes, avalanche, part of the Jules Verne trilogy it is.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Hercules and the Tyrants of Babylon (1964)

Mission: Impossible star Peter Lupus, under the pseudonym "Rock Stevens," has the title role in this sword-and-sandal epic. Before the film begins, the Babylonians defeated a Greek fleet and captured a bunch of women as slaves. Among them was the Queen of the Hellenes, who is also Hercules' main squeeze. While searching for her, he bugs the Babylonians by defeating their armies during their slave raids by throwing big rocks at them and smashing them with his big club. We cut away from Hercules for quite some time in order to set up a lot of political intrigues. It seems that Babylon is ruled by two brothers and a sister. The King of Assyria shows up with a huge amount of gold, offering it in exchange for their slaves. It seems he knows that the Queen of the Hellenes is among them, and he wants to force her into marriage so he can rule both realms. The Babylonians find out about this when the sister puts something in his drink that makes him tell the truth. They try to kill him when he rides off, but Hercules rescues him. This all leads to a convoluted series of double-crosses, as the King of the Assyrians pretends to work with Hercules, but plans to kill him; the Babylonians pretend to welcome Hercules, but plan to kill him; the three siblings all scheme against each other to become the one ruler; and Hercules manages to outsmart everybody. This is a lot less campy than many films of the same genre, with no monsters, no supernatural elements, and not even the usual dance sequence. Notable for a giant winch beneath the city of Babylon, connected to a bunch of chains, which are in turn connected to all the buildings in the place. We're told that it was built by Daedalus, but not why. It doesn't seem likely that you'd need a mechanical way to destroy the city, particularly one which requires one hundred slaves (or one strongman) to operate. Also noteworthy is a scene stolen directly from Spartacus, in which a bunch of slaves all claim to be the Queen of the Hellenes in order to protect her.
 

Jeffbert

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In Search of the Castaways - 1962 I saw this a few years ago, but well after having read the novel. very good version, if I recall correctly. I read all three of those novels. The film version of Mysterious Island was way off! :LOL:

Contact (1997) Also saw this, about 2 years ago. Read at least one of C. Sagan's books, just not this one.


Jeffbert, I should re-watch some of those. I saw most of them years ago on tv and there's no telling how much was cut for commercials. I did record Theatre of Blood and The Last Man on Earth. I've never seen the latter (first filming of Richard Matheson's I am Legend) and only saw the former once, on tv as a movie of the week so, again, probably chopped a bit (and it co-stars Diana Rigg, so very re-watchable).

Randy M.
I just love what VP's character did to Robert Morely's! Wait! Wiki says that was based on Titus Andronicus! :eek:

Dr. J & Mr. H (silent version) I think Hyde was depicted entirely by posture & facial expression-- those & his long hair. Ironical that John Barrymore ruined his life with booze.

Mummy's Curse (1944) essentially more of the same stuff. Worth watching if you must see all the Universal mummy films. sequel to The Mummy's Ghost (1944), which is sequel to The Mummy's Tomb (1942). Over the past month, I have seen all of these.

Blood from the Mummy's Tomb (1971) Hammer abandoned the wrapped mummy deal, & instead, used a woman whose father is an Egyptologist (?) who is a bit too invested in his study. He gives her a ring that was worn by an ancient princess whom the classic mummy was to guard. The spirit of the princess (whose body is in papa's cellar) begins to influence the guy's daughter.

When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth (1970) Also from Hammer; While the cavemen speak, there are no subtitles for translation. 'Akita' seems to be used very frequently, and means just about anything, so far as I could tell.

Dead Sleep (1990) Linda Blair as a nurse newly hired by an asylum. Here, the head psychiatrist has several patients in artificially induced comas, supposedly for therapeutic purposes. LB sees a few of them die, and has been harassed by a woman who protests the institute and its treatments. Soon, she is snooping and photographing her boss' documents.

Overly long and /or slow-paced.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Rock 'n roll horror (in more than one way) double feature:

Terror on Tour (1980)

Bottom-of-the-barrel slasher deals with a rock band with the members wearing black-and-white facial makeup, black wigs with orange streaks, and scarlet capes. Somebody disguised the same way kills some groupies. Could it be a band member, one of the roadies, their manager, or a fan? That's pretty much all that happens. There's a subplot in which a police lieutenant forces a woman with a criminal record to go undercover to investigate the murders, but it leads to nothing. A real band called The Names (apparently no relation to the European band of the same name) plays the fake band, known as the Clowns. Pretty boring and misogynistic stuff.

Son of Dracula (1974)

Not to be confused with the 1943 film of the same name, in which Lon Chaney, Jr., had the title role. This one stars Harry Nilsson in the title role. During the 19th century, Count Dracula (looking like Nosferatu) gets staked by an unseen person. Countess Dracula is not killed, and also happens to be pregnant. One hundred years later, Nilsson shows up in London. It seems that Merlin (Ringo Starr in a cartoon wizard costume) has calculated that the stars are right for the son of Dracula (whose name is Count Downe) to be crowned as the King of the Netherworld. Nilsson just wants to make music, become human, and win the love of a mortal woman. Baron Frankenstein offers to help him do this, but he really just wants to kill Nilsson and become King. Doctor Van Helsing shows up, and he genuinely wants to help Nilsson. There's also a werewolf, a Frankenstein monster, and so on. The story stops frequently to allow Nilsson to sing a song, with the help of the band the Count Downes (with members such as Peter Frampton and Keith Moon.) Although this is called a comedy, there are no jokes except the very weak one of the son of Dracula's name. Nilsson and Starr play their parts in dead serious monotones. It's all like a dull Hallowe'en party for musicians.
 

Toby Frost

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Although this is called a comedy, there are no jokes
This is pretty much my entire memory of The Magic Christian and How I Won The War. A vague (and dated) sense of subversiveness was all that was required. Both were dismal.

The last film I saw was Priest (2011), which is probably best watched in the background, with the volume down and heavy metal on the stereo. The best thing was probably the editing: it was mercifully free of the bloatedness of many films like that. Some of the sets and machinery were cool. But overall, it wasn't good.
 

J Riff

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/right. And i wartched Sewers of Gold, 1979... which is not about people making clothing from gold, but about tunneling in through the sewer system. Not the worst heist flick I've seen..
 

J Riff

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Well... the guy who plans the heist... he gets caught too but he's already given all the money to some real bad group...so it's like, political or something.
Sharknado 6 - what, there was a part 5? yes - Global Swarming, then 'It's About Time' - whence they gots to go back and stop the first ever Sharknado... and there's dinosaurs and a giant chainsaw to look at too.
 

Al Jackson

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The Adventures Of Sherlock Holmes. Ida Lupino!
Makes me think of Young Sherlock Holmes. I have seen references to it that 1985 film does not hold up well.
Watched it again a few weeks ago, I think it holds up well enough.
It is a riff on Holmes that is totally outside of Doyle it is a pretty good film.
Another quite unusual Holmes movie is Murder By Decree 1979, with what I think are the best Holmes and Watson of all time, Christopher Plummer and James Mason. The cast for that film was a who's who of English cinema in 1979.
 
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