What was the last movie you saw?

Jeffbert

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4 of W.C. Fields' films, Million Dollar Legs (1932), It's a Gift (1934), The Bank Dick (1940), Never Give a Sucker an even Break (1941) . Million Dollar Legs is about a bankrupt nation of super athletes who are unaware of their physical prowess. When a brush salesman who was to be executed for pursuing the President's daughter talks the firing squad into buying his brushes instead, forms an Olympic team of the subjects to win the $$, the humor kicks into high gear. The rest of them are also funny. There is a youtube clip with John Cleese narrating TCM's star of the month & such. :ROFLMAO:
 

Cathbad

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Crooked Man (2016)

A nursery rhyme - turned horror film!

Great story, fair to good acting, and a very cliché ending - but enjoyable, nonetheless!

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Allegra

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It's really not - though that is how most seem to take on their job. A Critic's job is supposed to be to critique the work presented them. This is a beef I've had with many of them forever. Siskel and Ebert used to irk me to no end!
The problem is that, there are, always have been too many quack critics in every field.
 

Vladd67

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Bushwick a independent film with some mixed acting, no great surprises but made a good attempt at making Brooklyn look like a war zone. Troops invade Bushwick and a graduate student and an ex marine/janitor have to help each other to survive.
 

Randy M.

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The Bishop’s Wife (1947)
The Bishop (David Niven) is having trouble with the main contributor of funds for the cathedral he wants to build to the glory of God. He prays for guidance and is sent an angel (Cary Grant) who helps him understand his priorities. I’ve always found Grant one of the most instantly likable of the ‘30s-‘40s movie stars and this is a good vehicle for him, more so than for Niven or Loretta Young (the Bishop’s wife) though both have their moments. Not really on a par with It’s a Wonderful Life or the next movie, but still it has some of the charm of the old fashioned holiday movies about ambition and pride versus love and humility. One thought: The suspension of disbelief in this one may not be the existence of angels but that Niven could be a Bishop. (One of the few 1940s movies I’ve seen in which I don’t recall once seeing anyone light a cigarette.)


Miracle on 34th Street (1947)
Stars Edmund Gwenn as Santa and Natalie Wood as a skeptical child; Maureen O’Hara and John Payne play pleasant diversions from Santa and the little girl. This is the original and if you haven’t seen the original, you really should. It has the old movie magic that salvages sentimental materials, not least because it finds and highlights the humor in the circumstances and provides some nice scenes for character actors like Thelma Ritter, Frank Albertson, Porter Hall, Gene Lockhart and William Frawley. Like The Bishop’s Wife this demonstrates how to make effective fantasy movies without massive special effects.


Krampus (2015)
Almost. This one almost works in part because Toni Collette, Adam Scott and Conchata Ferrell among others including a group of child actors, do a good job of selling the premise: A young boy is deeply hurt that his family no longer takes Christmas as seriously as he does. He writes Santa asking for his family to return to their earlier happiness and companionship. In a fit of anger and despair he tears up the letter and tosses it out the window and watches it disappear, wafted away by the wind. And then the terror starts with a blizzard and finally with the appearance of Krampus, the anti-Santa, who doesn’t give but takes. Krampus has some neat puppets, a nicely done animated sequence telling the grandmother’s story of her childhood meeting with Krampus, and a few funny moments and a few scary moments, but when it abandons the satirical for the horror it loses something. Among Christmas movies, Black Christmas (1974) did Christmas horror better, and Gremlins (1984) balanced horror and satire better.


The Lair of the White Worm (1988)
Based on a Bram Stoker novel that wasn’t Dracula, it takes its title from the novel. An evil reemerges in the English countryside after an old Roman ruin is partially unearthed and the skull of what appears to be a giant serpent is found among the ruins. It’s been years since I first saw this and my older self observed,
1) The opening credits and music suggest this as homage to Hammer Horror.
2) Hugh Grant has been playing Hugh Grant longer than I’d remembered. His level of comfort, ease and good humor in front of a camera was already evident. (It leads one to wonder if all Brits with surname Grant are charming, though Archie Leech might be skeptical of that assertion.)
3) If I’d remembered Peter Capaldi was in this, I might have paid more attention to his turn as Dr. Who. He’s not at all at a disadvantage playing across from Grant or Amanda Donohoe, and has a few scenes that are quite good.
4) Sammi Davis and Catherine Oxenburg aren’t given all that much to do except play bait.
5) In a just world, this would have made Amanda Donohoe a major star. In a semi-just world, she’d have become a distaff Peter Cushing or Vincent Price. Donohoe takes control of the film and it works as both comedy and horror because of her energy and gleeful inhabiting of her role; she has as light a touch with comedy as Grant, and more so than with the male stars when she’s off screen you start hoping she’ll show up soon because she’s so good at being bad.
6) Make up and costuming help Donohoe carry off her characterization, both gradually becoming more snake-like as the movie progresses.
7) Director Ken Russell was a perverse guy, or at least his movie-making was obsessed with sexuality: His earlier movie, Gothic, was a more serious exploration of the connections between Gothic and sex. This one is more forked-tongue-in-cheek and he seems to be having fun tying in as many mythic and cultural snake references as possible – the scene where Donohoe pops out of a wicker basket should be just stupid, but it works as an over-the-top visual aimed at nerds of all ages, as though he and Donohoe are acknowledging the silliness and reveling in it.


Blood From the Mummy’s Tomb (1971)
Based on another novel by Bram Stoker that wasn’t Dracula (The Jewel of the Seven Stars), this also features a female monster. An expedition finds the tomb of the Queen of Death, who was deemed so dangerous by Egyptian priests she was killed and her name removed from all records (with one tiny exception). Upon opening her sarcophagus the expedition members find her body is as it was when she was entombed, intact except for her right hand having been cut off, the stump of which is still bleeding. This should have been a clue to turn and run, but no. I haven’t seen this one before so now I understand why some older male fans on the Internet speak of Valerie Leon breathlessly; she was tall and full-figured, her eyes quite arresting when properly kohl-ed – er – mascara-ed. Being a later entry from Hammer Studios the director, Seth Holt, takes advantage of her beauty with revealing negligees and (pseudo-)Egyptian garb. And Leon puts in a good effort but exhibits none of the panache of Amanda Donohoe or if she had it, Holt didn’t know what to do with it. For what it is, Blood is entertaining – Hammer Horror, taking itself seriously and aided by several actors besides Leon, notably Andrew Keir (Quatermass and the Pit) and James Villiers (Asylum) – and the closing shot is smart and effective. Just don’t do what I did; if you’re at all interested watch this before watching Lair of the White Worm.


Randy M.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Caltiki, the Immortal Monster (1959)

Short version: The Italian Blob.

Some science types exploring Mayan ruins discover a cavern with a statue of the goddess Caltiki and an underground lake. One of the scientists has a Geiger counter. (On an archaeological dig?) Turns out the lake is full of radioactivity, thanks to a recent volcanic eruption (?). This radioactivity supplies energy to a one-celled life form billions of years old. It grows into a blob than dissolves the flesh off people. A sample of the critter gets taken back to civilization. Meanwhile, one guy, who has eyes for the pretty wife of the hero (although he also has a "half breed" girlfriend), gets infected by the thing, goes nuts, and attacks the wife in her home. Later a comet comes by that supplies the being with lots of radioactivity (??) so it grows into a huge monster. Army attacks it, and so on. This Italian version of an old-fashioned monster movie is enjoyable fun in a campy way. Some nice visuals from Mario Bava on a limited budget.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Frankenstein's Castle of Freaks (1974)



Sleazy Italian horror flick with a lot of weirdness, starting with the credits. Four actors are listed as "the Frankenstein monsters," which is a blatant lie; they're just Frankenstein's servants. Another actor is absurdly listed as "Boris Lugosi."

Somewhere in Europe, sometime in the past, some villagers beat up a caveman (!) and kill him. The body winds up with Count (sic) Frankenstein. Meanwhile, Frankenstein's servants dig up the body of a recently deceased young woman. One of the servants is a dwarf (the great Michael Dunn, really slumming it here) takes the opportunity to fondle her. Back at the castle, Frankenstein (Rossano Brazzi from South Pacific and other real movies, also slumming) takes one look at the dead woman and figures out she's been messed with. Out goes the dwarf.

By the way, there's never any clue what the dead woman is there for. All Frankenstein does is bring the caveman back to life (after giving him a shave and haircut!) Meanwhile, Frankenstein's daughter and her Best Friend Forever show up, in order to supply the movie's nude bathing scenes. The daughter's husband-to-be is there, too, to pretty much do nothing. Pretty soon Frankenstein is hitting on the BFF, and she responds just as quickly.

The dwarf is taken in by another caveman (that's our Boris Lugosi), teaches him to cook meat, and, in the movie's most repulsive scene, to kidnap, rape, and murder women. The dwarf's plot for revenge on Frankenstein leads to a fight between the two caveman, etc. Lots of irrelevant scenes: The affair between one the servants and another servant's wife (which begins with him slapping her around, which turns her on), a police inspector who does pretty much nothing, and so on.

There are some nice sets and costumes for such a deranged mess of a film.
 

J Riff

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I liked Kong too, except for the overly-moronic military guys. I mean..'What IS that?" they say, a bunch of times, as they look at a greaaat big monkey. Then they cleverly fly low enough for the 'what-is-it' to knock them all out of the sky and set up the plot. The other creatures are just as kool as Kong though, really nice to see some believable giant bugs for a change.
Here, it was Fiend Without a Face, which I hadn't watched for a long time. Early plasticine-animation, flying brains, atomic mutation. You can watch the lead actress forget the leads' name..'Oh, I wonder where....uhm, Jeff is." and they left it in.
 

Steve Harrison

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DARKEST HOUR
Very good film with a marvellous Gary Oldman as Churchill. A bit slow in places, with a couple of unnecessary Hollywood schmaltz moments, but it really evokes the chaos and panic in the British parliament as the seemingly unstoppable Nazi hoards swept through Europe. It's also a great companion piece to DUNKIRK. In fact, you could probably cut the two films together.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Frankenstein '80 (1972)

Even sleazier Italian horror flick, without much weirdness. A brilliant surgeon has created a serum which will prevent the rejection of organs after being transplanted. A reporter's sister is to receive the serum but it's stolen. She dies, and the brother conducts his own investigation. Of course, it was taken by Frankenstein. He's already stitched together corpses to create a monster, whom he calls Mosaic, but the creature needs frequent organ transplants due to rejection of the borrowed parts. Mosaic goes around raping and killing young women, and so on. A fair amount of gore and female nudity, although otherwise it's pretty dull.
 

Vince W

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Paddington 2. If you haven't seen this yet then do yourself a favour and see it ASAP. A wonderful film and in all honesty I think adults - especially those of us that grew up reading Paddington - get more out of the film than the children do. And Hugh Grant is priceless. Marvellous work all round from everyone. The only problem was that a bit of dust got caught in my eye near the end. *sniff*
 

clovis-man

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DARKEST HOUR
Very good film with a marvellous Gary Oldman as Churchill. A bit slow in places, with a couple of unnecessary Hollywood schmaltz moments, but it really evokes the chaos and panic in the British parliament as the seemingly unstoppable Nazi hoards swept through Europe. It's also a great companion piece to DUNKIRK. In fact, you could probably cut the two films together.
I thought the film did an excellent job of portraying the fear and anxiety of the Dunkirk period without resorting to lots of explosions. Gary Oldman was great as Sir Winston. Fine supporting cast also. Lots of Churchill quotes were squeezed in. They even managed to slide in my favorite as he characterized Clement Attlee as a "sheep in sheeps clothing". My favorite scene was the underground ride to Westminster. Go see it.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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The Wizard of Mars (1965)

Ultra-cheap space flick. Three men and a woman are in a spaceship headed for Mars. They run into something (animated lightning bolts and glowing orange circles) which forces them to crash on Mars. They trudge around the red planet (played by Great Basin National Park.) Little goofy-looking rubber critters attack them from the "canal," they wander inside a cavern, finally find a golden road that leads to an ancient Martian city, they find the bodies of the inhabitants inside tubes, an image of John Carradine talks to them, they free the Martian city from being frozen in time by fooling around with this weird pendulum thing, they get zapped back to the spaceship, where only a few minutes have passed. Vague references to The Wizard of Oz, wooden acting, miserable special effects.
 

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