What was the last movie you saw?

Submarine D-1 (1937) Interesting film that centers on the love conflicts between two guys
'Butch' Rogers (Pat O'Brien) & 'Sock' McGillis (Wayne Morris; not very familiar with him) who are best buddies when at sea, but love rivals on land.

The film shows the training submariners undergo in escaping from broken sub under water. Anyway, Rodgers invents a rescue device that come in handy, when the sub suffers a boo-boo and becomes disabled under hundreds of feet of sea water. One crewmember is seriously injured and cannot evacuate using the standard technique. The only way to save him is by using the untested device.

Frank McHugh as 'Lucky' Jones serves as comic relief.

7/10-8/10
 
Two, count 'em, 2 Harold Lloyd comedies:

For Heaven's Sake (1926) The Uptown Boy (Harold Lloyd) is a snobbish guy who, by chance, finds himself financing a downtown Mission. When he sees his name over the door, he demands it be removed, wanting no association with such a charity. Then, he meets the preacher's daughter (Jobyna Ralston), and his mind turns to mush. He boldly states that he will round-up the guys who most need to be there, which begins the hilarity! :ROFLMAO:

9/10

Silent films have a very different approach to comedy, than the contemporary ones. It is mostly physical, occasionally appearing in the dialog or other such text.


GRANDMA'S BOY (1922) A coward (Harold Lloyd) wishes he could take part in the posse to track-down and catch the villain, but he is a chicken. His granny (Anna Townsend) gives him the decorative handle from her umbrella, telling him it is a powerful good luck charm, and fabricating a story about his grandfather who used it to defeat his enemies. Thus emboldened [cool word, huh?] The guy goes after the guy billed as THE ROLLING STONE (Dick Sutherland), Taking him on, in a fist fight, until he realizes the charm is no longer in his pocket! Then, he frantically searches for the charm/handle. :LOL:


I thought For Heaven's Sake was the funnier of the two, though was thoroughly enjoying both.

8/10
 
Three movies, two with odd ellipsis ...

One of Our Spies is Missing (1966) dir. E. Darrell Hallenbeck; starring Robert Vaughn, David McCallum, Leo G. Carroll, Maurice Evans, Vera Miles

Spliced together episodes of The Man from U.N.C.L.E. seen on Turner Cable Movies. Some episodes were spliced together to form ~2 hour movies that then became theatrical features in Europe. Here scientist creates age-reversing machine and both U.N.C.L.E. (United Network Command for Law and Enforcement) and T.H.R.U.S.H. (which may or may not have been an acronym according to Wikipedia) want it. U.N.C.L.E. operatives Napoleon Solo and Illya Kuryakin make decisions that should have gotten them killed and replaced with more sensible agents. My main complaint is that several times actions are indicated (as in, "Yes, that's what I'll do") and the action isn't shown but the next scene jumps to the consequences of it being successful. It's an old TV show so I guess that was a time/budget cut consideration, so it seemed odd when I watched the next feature and something similar happens a couple of times. [By the way, only watch this if you're greatly nostalgic.]


The Drowning Pool (1975) dir. Stuart Rosenberg; starring Paul Newman, Joanne Woodward, Anthony Franciosa, Melanie Griffith

Also on TCM. Newman playing private detective Lew Harper, again, and again based on a novel of the same title by Ross Macdonald. (I haven't read it.) Harper is lured from Southern California to New Orleans hired by former flame Iris (Woodward) to investigate a blackmail attempt. This naturally leads to murder. The first movie, Harper (1966), had a '60s jauntiness this one lacks; in fact, though it's not really bad and features solid performances from the leads and an enjoyable scenery chewing performance from Murry Hamilton (The Graduate; Jaws), it feels tired. And there's the odd thing noted above, though not as often as in ...Spies... that a couple of places something is indicated only for the next scene to skip it and go to the next thing.

Lastly,
Pearl (2022) dir. Ti West; starring Mia Goth, David Corenswet, Tandi Wright

Seen on Showtime.

Pearl first appeared in X as an old, murderous woman. This is her backstory. In 1918 Pearl dreams of Hollywood and dancing. But her mother is fearful of the Spanish Influenza, which keeps Pearl on the farm; further, her father is paralyzed and her mother insists she help take care of him since they are the only ones who can run the farm. Pearl is more than a little resentful of this and of her husband, who was supposed to save her from the farm, instead marching off to war.

Mia Goth is ... wow. Her Pearl vacillates between little-girl dreaminess, neediness and exuberance, and big-girl rage. Pearl wants escape, but lacks the skills, talents or knowledge needed to gain it; she wants friendship and love but it always turns to envy; she wonders why others dislike her and is oblivious to her self-centered actions and speech. She also has impulse control issues. At times I felt this movie was in conversation with Psycho as it charts the evolution of a monster, and while there's not a lot of blood and gore, what there is is effective because the characters are delineated and plausibly real.

This an exceptionally good movie. But there is some blood and gore, so be forewarned.
 
I watched the movie "The Irishman" directed by Martin Scorsese. The film is based on the book "I Heard You Paint Houses" by Charles Brandt and tells the story of a hitman and former truck driver Frank Sheeran. I was really impressed by the depth and complexity of the plot, as well as the performances of the cast.
 
Holiday Affair (1949) Connie Ennis (Janet Leigh) works as one who buys things from department stores, only to return them the next day; thus the company finds whose prices are lower. Steve Mason (Robert Mitchum) works in one of those department stores, and is under orders to catch and photograph these people, who are to be banned from entering such stores.

Ennis has a little boy, who assumes the train set mama has brought home is to be his Christmas present. Carl Davis (Wendell Corey) is Ennis' boyfriend, who will lose to Mason, etc.

Harry/Henry Morgan supports as Police Lieutenant.

O.k. romance/comedy. 7/10;
 
Dark Passage (1947) Vincent Parry (Humphrey Bogart) is a wrongly convicted escaped convict, whose face is not seen until after the plastic surgery. I remember a certain animated cartoon depicting such a procedure. It was rather funny. Anyway, this receives the full NOIR ALLEY treatment, and deservedly so. Would have been nice if it were in color, since the color of Madge Rapf's (Agnes Moorehead) car was rather important to the plot.

Anyway Parry meets Irene Jansen (Lauren Bacall), who knowing he is an escaped con, helps him anyway. Her own father was also wrongly convicted, so she empathizes with his plight.

So, there is a photo of him in the newspaper that seems to be a photo rather than art, but who was the guy who posed for this?
Dark Passage, 03556.jpg

About the plot, the less you know, the more you will enjoy this.

There was a scene depicting Parry's hallucinations while under the anesthetic.


9/10.
 
The Monsters Demolisher Sp. 1962 Continuing editing thru oceans of rubbish, we have this, which is basically part 2 of the slightly less inane The Curse of Nostradamus and others in this series.
Looks like they shot a bunch of footage then stuck 2 movies together...and this one ends suddenly and makes very little sense. But, we get the bad dubbing, esp/ Leo the Hunchback and.. some really cheapo bat fx... and... next.
 
THE ST. VALENTINE'S DAY MASSACRE 1967 - Roger Corman wanted to shoot it in Chicago--would have helped with the scenes where you can see the sun shining as the snow is falling. Still, one of his best films that looks great in HD.
 
Beyond this Place - 1959 -- A man (Van Johnson) returns to England to find out about his father and learns he is in prison for murder and begins investigating the case. Melodrama more than a crime film.


Sunscorched - 1965 -- "When the town sheriff (Mark Stevens) backs down from outlaws, he is branded a coward. This melodramatic western follows his efforts to restore his good name, even though he himself was a former member of the gang." Mario Adorf is leader of the gang, and has some good moments. What's interesting is how it builds up in violence leading to a murder that I didn't expect. Marianne Koch spends most of the movie in a stable--she has the same job as Jack Elam in Support Your Local Sheriff--working with horses "one end or the other"--spends much of the time pitching hay with a big fork (which comes into a different use at the end of the movie). It's odd to see a woman spending the whole pretty much in the stable. If I compared it to High Noon, instead of the protagonist heading for a confrontation before leaving town--the whole point is him reasserting his reasons for staying in the town. There's also the opportunity for him to leave his wife for another woman--that's another interesting aspect of it--the ending suggests this, like the outlaws, was a temptation that ultimately must be neutralized so he can resume his family life (and a build a new house like Petrocelli).
 
Watched "Glass" last night. The final enstallment in M. Night Shyamalan's trilogy. An interesting low key superhero film that plays up to the tropes of the genre. A little too on the nose with that at times with the explanations and I felt the reasons for keeping them in the "hospital" a little thin but I enjoyed it.
 
The Irishman (2019, directed by Martin Scorsese)

A lorry driver called Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro) joins and works his way up the levels of the mafia, coming into contact with politicians and union bosses.

This is one of those films where the mafia is traced through historical events, particularly the career and disappearance of the union boss Jimmy Hoffa. The de-aging on the three main actors (Joe Pesci, Robert De Niro and Al Pacino) is pretty good throughout, although it makes the "young" version of De Niro's character look oddly like Robin Williams.

The acting is decent and the film is very well-shot and lavish (the budget must have been huge). The structure is very good, involving two framing stories. However, perhaps inevitably, it feels assembled out of other mafia films, some of them by the same director: the hero beats a civilian who has offended his daughter; there's an enormous cheesy party with tired trophy wives; an allegedly beloved friend is betrayed, and so on. I'm sure this is accurate, but it says nothing new. Life in the mafia feels dull, brutal, sentimental and, above all, incredibly naff. I was quite sick of crooning and doo-wop music by the end.

The trouble is that none of the characters have anything interesting to say beyond the old schtick: they're just goons doing goon stuff.
(Jimmy Hoffa in particular seems staggeringly stupid, as if he has a death wish.) It's impossible to warm to the hero or see him as a representative of much, as he's very clearly a sociopath.

Would I recommend it? Ultimately, I'd probably shrug and say "Eh, it is what it is, y'know?". It's undoubtedly a very good film, but it also feels slightly pointless.
 
Last edited:
I saw a movie called “Sting”, a creature feature movie which I thought was quite good fun, although very derivative of other movies of the genre.
 
If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do? (1971)

A preacher with the wonderful name of Estus W. Pirkle warns his congregation that, unless America reforms within twenty-four months, the Communists will take over in a coup lasting fifteen minutes. Among the evils to be rejected is dancing. The sermon is interrupted by scenes of what the Communists will do when they take over. Mass shootings, a little kid getting his head cut off, etc. Our movie's Bad Girl listens to the sermon and reforms her ways.

Without getting into the theology, the combination of preaching and blood-soaked scenes of violence is unusual, to say the least.
 
The Strangeness (1985)



Old-fashioned monster movie. Some folks go down into an abandoned mine and get attacked by a slimy tentacled critter. The technical aspects are OK, I guess, and the monster is created through stop motion animation, which is cool, but good grief is this thing slow. It takes forever to get to the monster. There's also some excruciating comedy relief.
 
If Footmen Tire You, What Will Horses Do? (1971)
The title there is from Jeremiah 12:5 which in the King James Bible reads: If thou hast run with the footmen, and they have wearied thee, then how canst thou contend with horses? and if in the land of peace, wherein thou trusted, they wearied thee, then how wilt thou do in the swelling of Jordan?*

I'm interested to know if this was the text of the sermon he was preaching. If that's so it's about the worse exposition of that Scripture I can imagine. But I suppose that was probably the point.

*I mostly do not like the KJV translation.
 
The Irishman (2019, directed by Martin Scorsese)

A lorry driver called Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro) joins and works his way up the levels of the mafia, coming into contact with politicians and union bosses.

This is one of those films where the mafia is traced through historical events, particularly the career and disappearance of the union boss Jimmy Hoffa. The de-aging on the three main actors (Joe Pesci, Robert De Niro and Al Pacino) is pretty good throughout, although it makes the "young" version of De Niro's character look oddly like Robin Williams.

The acting is decent and the film is very well-shot and lavish (the budget must have been huge). The structure is very good, involving two framing stories. However, perhaps inevitably, it feels assembled out of other mafia films, some of them by the same director: the hero beats a civilian who has offended his daughter; there's an enormous cheesy party with tired trophy wives; an allegedly beloved friend is betrayed, and so on. I'm sure this is accurate, but it says nothing new. Life in the mafia feels dull, brutal, sentimental and, above all, incredibly naff. I was quite sick of crooning and doo-wop music by the end.

The trouble is that none of the characters have anything interesting to say beyond the old schtick: they're just goons doing goon stuff.
(Jimmy Hoffa in particular seems staggeringly stupid, as if he has a death wish.) It's impossible to warm to the hero or see him as a representative of much, as he's very clearly a sociopath.

Would I recommend it? Ultimately, I'd probably shrug and say "Eh, it is what it is, y'know?". It's undoubtedly a very good film, but it also feels slightly pointless.

Jack Nicholson did a far superior Jimmy Hoffa.

Paper Moon, 1973. A father-and-daughter acting team portray a con artist and his new ward. Great music, entertaining.
 
Kingdom of the Planet of the Apes long title but overall a good film. I mean yes one could pick holes in it like most films but on the whole it was pretty good. The characters had good motivation and it was quite nuanced for a main stream film. The whole world-in-decay stuff was good for the most part. Always a few caveats like electricity that still works after 500 years of not being used but I'll forgive that for the general story and the homages to the original film without being overly cheesy.
 
The Bloody Vampire 1962 This one delivers some blood, a vampire name of Count Frankenhousen, extended rubber bat action as well as the usual quite silly dubbed voices. Good cackling witch, mumbly Hunchback and weird sound FX. An anti-Vampire drug is concocted but I don't think they get to use it. Coffee is consumed and advertised like a new drug. Spoiler > Rubber bat Frankenhousen flies off laughing at the end. The sets in these always look good esp. in B and W.
 

Similar threads


Back
Top