What was the last movie you saw?

Reacting to Victoria and numerous other posters. It would be appreciated if streaming or other sources of access could be stated. Of course it might be non-US (as that is where I reside) but generally a poster knows where they found it and it is a courtesy for those who value the opinions of reviewers,
Oh, and by the way. I greatly appreciate this commentary on genre that most of us have forgotten. Thank you Victoria.
 
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Murder in Harlem (1935)


Not a good film, really. Primitively filmed, with some poor acting indeed. Of historical interest, and unusual because it's a "race" film with some white actors. Also remarkable in 1935 for having "damn," "hell," and even [female dog] in the dialogue.
I am assuming that it was not submitted to the Hayes office.

I was reading about Noble Johnson--he was in King Kong 1933 as the chief--and appeared as every type of character from Arab to Chinese to Indian to Russian. And he had a film studio as well.
I don't trust wikipedia for accuracy but this is interesting:

Noble was good friends with fellow actor Lon Chaney, his schoolmate in Colorado.[2] He was also an entrepreneur, founding his own studio, Lincoln Motion Picture Company, in 1916 in Omaha, Nebraska, with his younger brother George Perry Johnson. The Lincoln Motion Picture Company was an African-American film company (apart from director Harry A. Gant) that produced what were called "race films", movies made for the African-American audience, which was largely ignored by the "mainstream" film industry...
 
History Is Made at Night (1937) A man helping his drunken friend stagger home, hears a commotion in the next apartment. Perceiving a woman is in distress, he enters the apartment, turns off the lights, demands her jewels, grabs her, and leaves. In his car, he identifies himself not as a kidnapper, but her hero. But the guy with wounded pride, who had ordered his butler to kiss her, kills the butler, and blames the unknown man for the murder.

The woman Irene Vail (Jean Arthur) was on the final day of no boyfriends so she can divorce her husband Bruce Vail (Colin Clive), who had brought a photographer with him, stormed into her apartment, which his butler had just entered, intending to catch them in the act of kissing, etc., thereby voiding her hope for divorce.

Now, a dashing hero Paul Dumond (Charles Boyer; the inspiration for Pepe La Pew) who is not of the upper class, but merely a head waiter in one of France's fanciest restaurants finds himself in love with an upper class woman, and also accused of murder.

supporting cast includes Leo Carrillo as the restaurant's head chef, Cesare. "Oh, Cisco" "Oh Pancho."

8/10; a very entertaining film.
 
WEREWOLF SHADOW 1971 -- Rewatch but my verdict is still that I don't care for Paul Naschy the werewolf and despite some atmospheric moments it's rather bland compared to other period vampire films or the Blind Dead films.
 
Tora Tora Tora (1970)

I remember as a youngster watching this in the cinema when it was first released. I think it was the first war movie I’d ever seen on the big screen (others I’d watched but only on TV).

I blame this movie for my undying fascination with the Imperial Japanese Navy in general and Japanese aircraft carrier design in particular.
 
Harold Robbins' Stiletto 1969 -For some reason they always put Robbins in front of the title but was really that much of a draw? Seems like he was heavily promoted and then zilch. But that describes this film quite well--a zilch. It stars Alex Cord who was not meant to be a leading man and yet he had a few starring roles in the late 60s including The Brotherhood which was remade a few years later --- Cord was a returning GI who ends up in the family mafia business--and his character was portrayed by Al Pacino in the remake. He was alright in some supporting roles but just not meant for the leading man. In this case Patrick O'Neal is his co-star who is not quite the leading man type either. The plot involves a criminal who gets recruited by the mafia as a hit man and he goes around like James Bond stabbing people in the back with a (take a guess). What makes this film interesting is how many people appear in supporting parts or uncredited who ended up bigger names than Cord or O'Neal. There's Roy Scheider, Lincoln Kilpatrick (playing a character named Hannibal Smith--I love it when a plan comes together), Antonio Fargas, James Tolkan, Olympia Dukakis, Raul Julia, Charles Durning, M. Emmet Walsh--I spotted Diane Muldaur as well--IMDB doesn't have her listed. And Peter O'Toole appears too. It's not a good or even fair movie but memorable for the showcase of familiar faces.
 
Harold Robbins' Stiletto 1969 -For some reason they always put Robbins in front of the title but was really that much of a draw? Seems like he was heavily promoted and then zilch. But that describes this film quite well--a zilch. It stars Alex Cord who was not meant to be a leading man and yet he had a few starring roles in the late 60s including The Brotherhood which was remade a few years later --- Cord was a returning GI who ends up in the family mafia business--and his character was portrayed by Al Pacino in the remake. He was alright in some supporting roles but just not meant for the leading man. In this case Patrick O'Neal is his co-star who is not quite the leading man type either. The plot involves a criminal who gets recruited by the mafia as a hit man and he goes around like James Bond stabbing people in the back with a (take a guess). What makes this film interesting is how many people appear in supporting parts or uncredited who ended up bigger names than Cord or O'Neal. There's Roy Scheider, Lincoln Kilpatrick (playing a character named Hannibal Smith--I love it when a plan comes together), Antonio Fargas, James Tolkan, Olympia Dukakis, Raul Julia, Charles Durning, M. Emmet Walsh--I spotted Diane Muldaur as well--IMDB doesn't have her listed. And Peter O'Toole appears too. It's not a good or even fair movie but memorable for the showcase of familiar faces.
Robbins was one of the most popular authors on the planet back then, so it was reasonable marketing. He wrote lurid stuff with lots of sex. Interesting that he has disappeared so thoroughly.
 
Robbins was one of the most popular authors on the planet back then, so it was reasonable marketing. He wrote lurid stuff with lots of sex. Interesting that he has disappeared so thoroughly.
He had popular standing with media companies that apparently gave him a great deal of marketing support which they labeled as popularity (Sidney Sheldon was another--and Jacqueline Susann). What's interesting is that the media which promoted him so heavily dumped him so completely after his time. They have no interest in revisiting his work while other authors who never had that kind of media support might have more longevity through reader word of mouth.
Looks like he will be best remembered for a comical mention in Star Trek IV-The Voyage Home as "one of the giants of 20th century literature."
 
He had popular standing with media companies that apparently gave him a great deal of marketing support which they labeled as popularity (Sidney Sheldon was another--and Jacqueline Susann). What's interesting is that the media which promoted him so heavily dumped him so completely after his time. They have no interest in revisiting his work while other authors who never had that kind of media support might have more longevity through reader word of mouth.
Looks like he will be best remembered for a comical mention in Star Trek IV-The Voyage Home as "one of the giants of 20th century literature."
His stuff is incredibly dated now. I dont know if it is even in print. I read a few back in the day. Worth picking up, for historical interest, if you find one in a charity shop.
 
He only sold 750,000,000 copies. I guess some were half decent as they were made into films.
 
He only sold 750,000,000 copies. I guess some were half decent as they were made into films.
That makes me think they exaggerated because even wikipedia's page on him has almost nothing under In Popular Culture--so allegedly he was an author who everyone read and everyone immediately forgot. None of the movies made into films appear to have struck a nerve of remembrance either. The Carpetbaggers? I heard of King Creole but that is only because of the Elvis involvement.

Did he come up with any literary quotes?
It is pretty amazing to be allegedly that popular and then totally forgotten. It appears that popularity was entirely detached from merit factors.
 
I wonder if the sleazy nature was something people pretended to forget. Or grew out of.

This seems an appropriate quote from the Carpetbaggers:

“Funny how you can go along for years hardly thinking about someone, then all of a sudden be so glad to see him.”
 
I wonder if the sleazy nature was something people pretended to forget. Or grew out of.
That is what I was thinking--maybe it was the sleazy nature of them which made them all the rage. There are lots of examples of books that get read as a filler and then forgotten.
But this is what is strange to me--why--if he was so popular--a brand name--why did the media companies completely abandon him so fast?
I thought their reason to exist was to make money--so if he was such a gravy train (and being apparently, the most read author of the 20th century would count for something), why not promote him for at least a little while longer?

At least James T Kirk remembers him. Maybe he became popular with Klingons.
Anyway....



TRAPPED - 197 2 - Tv-movie in which divorced dad James Brolin is mugged and wakes up in a department store being patrolled by attack dogs. I like how they establish the nature of the scenario--the dog handlers come in wearing head-to-toe body armor and fencing masks and the main handler limps. Why does he limp we immediately wonder.
 
TRAPPED - 197 2 - Tv-movie in which divorced dad James Brolin is mugged and wakes up in a department store being patrolled by attack dogs. I like how they establish the nature of the scenario--the dog handlers come in wearing head-to-toe body armor and fencing masks and the main handler limps. Why does he limp we immediately wonder.
I remember that film! As I recall, the doors were locked from both sides, and the guy could not get out, even if he could avoid the Dobermans and reach an outside door. Tense.
 
His stuff is incredibly dated now. I dont know if it is even in print. I read a few back in the day. Worth picking up, for historical interest, if you find one in a charity shop.

Again history is littered with once incredibly popular but now forgotten writers.
My favourite example is George W. M. Reynolds who sold MILLIONS of copies back in the day outselling his contemporaries Dickens and Thackery by the bucket load. These days he's all but forgotten (apart maybe from his deliriously dreadful Wagner the Werewolf which I recommend to all) but Dickens still sells - though do people still read Thackery these days?

Anyway... last movie.
Danger Diabolik! with #1Son who fell asleep half way through; bored out of his skull - the Philistine ingrate!
 
Escape From East Berlin (1962) A very dramatic intro, before the title was even shown, shows actual newsreel clips of people being shot down during escape attempts. The narrative includes stuff about no trials, no crimes, just imprisoned, etc.

Very intense film. The two stars, named in separate screens, were unfamiliar to me, Kurt Schröder (Don Murray) is a mechanic working for the govt. motor pool, who unsuccessfully tries to dissuade his friend from driving a large heavy truck right through the wall, and when the dead guy's sister Erika Jurgens (Christine Kaufmann) believes that her brother escaped alive, he, somehow cannot get the chance to tell her that her brother is dead.

Unable to convince the girl to abandon her hope of escape, Schröder ends up digging a tunnel under the wall, which because his home in an apartment, is just 20 feet or so, from the wall. When the tunnel is past the halfway, point, Walter Brunner (Werner Klemperer) suddenly appears at the door, saying he knows what Schröder is doing, and wants in. But is he a real escapee, or a spy?

My 2nd time watching it, and this time, I happened to notice a few things,

  1. the upper floors of the apartment building were bombed-out
  2. rubble was everywhere
  3. This was filmed in W. Berlin
  4. everyone carried identity papers at all times, and the authorities could demand them, at any time, even if within your own home
  5. Anyone who does escape, brings consequences upon family who still live in E. Berlin
8/10
 
Lusty Men (1952) Rodeo riders in the 20th century.

Wes Merritt (Arthur Kennedy) was a cowhand working for little pay, that is, not enough to buy his own ranch, which was his dream. Along comes Jeff McCloud (Robert Mitchum), who as an injured and washed-up rodeo star, enthralls Merrit with his tales of rodeo greatness. When she learns of her husband's intent to get the money by way of rodeos, she (Susan Hayward) is not going along with the idea, because she is worried he may be injured, and unable to earn a living at all. Nevertheless, he has his way, until coming to his senses, after McvCloud is killed, trying to prove that he is better than Merritt.

8/10
 

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