What was the last movie you saw?

alexvss

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Planet of the apes (1968).

I’ve been avoiding this movie for many years, but I finally made myself watch it. My first reaction towards the apes was finding it hilarious (mostly because of the costumes, but newer Planet of the Apes movies are also uncanny AF), but the movie takes itself seriously, and I was too in no time.

The beats are very well-written. The first time the protagonist spoke really caught me off guard. Also when we see his companions for the first time after capture. The ending must’ve been a great deal to watch in the movie theater (I wish I could’ve seen it without prior knowledge, but that scene is pretty much widespread at this point).

Apart from being a great science-fiction about the elasticity of time, it’s also a study on oppression. It makes you think about our relationship with animals by reversing it. The ministry of science is also the “chief defender of the faith”, and the apes in charge want nothing more than maintaining their positions by keeping the commoners in the dark.

There’s some nudity in it. Not something I’d expect from a movie from that year (but, coming to think of it, that’s the year the Hays Code went down).

Oh, and a fun fact: In Portugal, they translate movie titles in a very funny way. Planet of the Apes is The Man That Came From The Future in that country, basically spoiling the whole thing.
 

Oligonicella

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So, no one watched schlock? Hard to believe, so I'll tell you what I really watched last night -> Tinker Bell - The Secret of the Wings. I do not care what you think of me. heh

Now, if the topic meant watching one 'seriously', then anything written/directed/produced by Jamin Winans - Ink, The Frame, 11:59. The man has wonderful ideas and is a true master of cinematography.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Where to Invade Next (2015)

One of Michael Moore's documentaries. Despite the title, it's not about warfare. The gimmick is that Moore "invades" various nations in order to "steal" their methods of doing things better than the USA. Paid vacations for Italian workers, high quality school lunches for French children, free college education (even for Americans) in Slovenia, etc. There's some of Moore's typical smart aleck comedy, but for the most part it's quite serious. No jokes when discussing Germany's decision to provide a large number of public reminders of the Nazi part, for example.
 

KGeo777

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VIGILANTE FORCE- 1976 - A town is having problems with oil worker rowdies so local boy Jan-Michael Vincent is asked to recruit his Vietnam vet brother (Kris Kristofferson) as a hardcase cop to calm things down. He and his fellow soldiers succeed in quelling the problems but decide to make their own--escalating until people are killed. Vincent has to confront the military vets during a Bicentennial parade. Lots of explosions in the final act.
 

alexvss

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Total Recall (1990).

One more classic I’ve been avoiding. However, I did watch that trainwreck of a remake (worse: I paid for it). And I did read every Philip K. Dick story that has been adapted to film, but I don’t… recall this one really well (couldn’t resist the pun). Also, I read Schawenegger’s biography which is named after this movie. It’s boring as hell; don’t read it.

Thirty seconds in and I'm bursting into laughter. Schwarzenegger yelling and grunting is just too much for me :ROFLMAO:. The nasty situations and wisecracks made me laugh throughout the whole movie as well.

It doesn’t take long to realize you’re watching a Paul Verhoeven movie. Naughty stuff all over the place :LOL:.

All in all, it’s entertainment at its finest. It even ends with a kiss. I wish I could’ve seen that in the theater in 1990; I'd have given an standing ovation. If they create something like Total Recall I may implant that memory someday :X3:.
 

HareBrain

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Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse (2018). So, so good. Not only the only superhero film I've seen in the past thirty years I've had any time for, but about as near-perfect a movie as I've ever seen, in almost every respect. Joy (with some sadness) from start to finish, and a masterpiece of animation.
 

pogopossum

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Asteroid City.
Wes Anderson was suggested for an Oscar for the film by one NYT reviewer, as was the script.
A play within a play, but too complex (quirky?) to detail. The setting in the Arizona desert belies the theoretical stage setting, but constant interjections do not. Look up details on Wikipedia if interested. Probably out of a desire to work with Anderson it includes a stellar cast, mostly walk-ons.
including Jason Schwartzman, Scarlett Johansson, Tom Hanks, Jeffrey Wright, Tilda Swinton, Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Adrien Brody, Liev Schreiber, Hope Davis, Steve Park, Rupert Friend, Maya Hawke, Steve Carell, Matt Dillon, Hong Chau, Willem Dafoe, Margot Robbie, Tony Revolori, Jake Ryan and Jeff Goldblum.
I liked it.
 

Randy M.

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Spiderman: Into the Spider-Verse (2018). So, so good. Not only the only superhero film I've seen in the past thirty years I've had any time for, but about as near-perfect a movie as I've ever seen, in almost every respect. Joy (with some sadness) from start to finish, and a masterpiece of animation.
I still want a Spider-pig feature.
 

paranoid marvin

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Total Recall (1990).

One more classic I’ve been avoiding. However, I did watch that trainwreck of a remake (worse: I paid for it). And I did read every Philip K. Dick story that has been adapted to film, but I don’t… recall this one really well (couldn’t resist the pun). Also, I read Schawenegger’s biography which is named after this movie. It’s boring as hell; don’t read it.

Thirty seconds in and I'm bursting into laughter. Schwarzenegger yelling and grunting is just too much for me :ROFLMAO:. The nasty situations and wisecracks made me laugh throughout the whole movie as well.

It doesn’t take long to realize you’re watching a Paul Verhoeven movie. Naughty stuff all over the place :LOL:.

All in all, it’s entertainment at its finest. It even ends with a kiss. I wish I could’ve seen that in the theater in 1990; I'd have given an standing ovation. If they create something like Total Recall I may implant that memory someday :X3:.


Great, great movie. Yes the remake is simply awful. And almost worth staying in your alternate reality if you have Sharon Stone for a wife, she is super-stunning in that movie.
 

alexvss

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High and Low (1963). After declaring war against his company’s board of directors, a shoemaker’s son gets kidnapped.

An Akira Kurosawa movie, once again starring his long-lasting partner Toshiro Mifune. I think it’s the first non-samurai Kurosawa movie that I saw, and it’s amazing.

The first hour or so is like those one-room movies, heavy on dialogue, like Twelve Angry Men (1957); the second half is the investigation to catch the kidnapper. Both are masterpieces. It’s a very philosophical movie too.

Strongly recommended.
 

KGeo777

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Total Recall (1990).
.
I saw it at a theater in 1990.
"Rekall Rekall Rekall. Thinking of going there? Don't. I had a friend--nearly got himself lobotomized. Don't f**K with your brain pal, it ain't worth it."

"Hey I got five kids to feed."

The Brubaker ID was a reference to Capricorn One.

The genesis of the film is interesting--since other directors were involved like Cronenberg. I read itt was his contribution that Quaid didn't want to go back to his former self.
I kind of like the original ending idea though--where he

learns that the alien device has his hand print in it--because he was in fact an all-powerful alien weapon and that was why they had to brainwash him. They couldn't kill him. Once he puts his hand on the device he has total recall and says "it's going to be fun playing god." And he was supposed to be a nerdy type guy too. Would have worked better with Rick Moranis as Quaid in that version.

Also--wasn't it confirmed that he was in fact having a schizoid embolism? They mentioned "blue sky on Mars" during his Rekall visit. So he saved the planet but ended up lobotomized on earth.
 

paranoid marvin

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I saw it at a theater in 1990.
"Rekall Rekall Rekall. Thinking of going there? Don't. I had a friend--nearly got himself lobotomized. Don't f**K with your brain pal, it ain't worth it."

"Hey I got five kids to feed."

The Brubaker ID was a reference to Capricorn One.

The genesis of the film is interesting--since other directors were involved like Cronenberg. I read itt was his contribution that Quaid didn't want to go back to his former self.
I kind of like the original ending idea though--where he

learns that the alien device has his hand print in it--because he was in fact an all-powerful alien weapon and that was why they had to brainwash him. They couldn't kill him. Once he puts his hand on the device he has total recall and says "it's going to be fun playing god." And he was supposed to be a nerdy type guy too. Would have worked better with Rick Moranis as Quaid in that version.

Also--wasn't it confirmed that he was in fact having a schizoid embolism? They mentioned "blue sky on Mars" during his Rekall visit. So he saved the planet but ended up lobotomized on earth.

Some interesting info there thanks.

For me, I usually know a movie is going to be a great one when it has Michael Ironside in it. He's just such a great bad guy, and up there with Pete Postlethwaite as one of the best supporting actors in movies. The look on his face when he's told "I'm sure she hated every minute of it ." spoke more than a thousand words ever could.
 

Jeffbert

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My Favorite Spy (1942) Kay Kyser (Kay Kyser) As the bandleader, suddenly finds himself in the Army. After some confusion, he is told he is to participate in a mission to flush out 5th Column traitors who are sending Morse code messages in the music he plays.

Harry Robinson (Robert Armstrong) is the guy who owns/operates the nightclub where Kyser & his band perform. He is suspected of selling-out to the enemy, all they need is the evidence.

Thoroughly entertaining! 8/10!
 

Jeffbert

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Homecoming (1948) Ulysses Johnson (Clark Gable) was a surgeon whose patients were upper-crust types, but when he becomes an Army physician, he learns that money ins not the important thing in life, as he operates on men from all walks of life, etc.

While on a ship taking him into the war, while talking with another medical man, Col. Johnson is annoyed by a no-experience young woman interrupts with her own opinion.

Eventually, he has her as his head nurse. Lt. Jane "Snapshot" McCall (Lana Turner) has no qualms about stating her opinion, etc., & the two fall in love.

All this is told as a flashback, when the Colenel is asked about his war experiences by a reporter, while on a ship heading back to the USA, after war's end.

8/10
 

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