What was the last movie you saw?

Jeffbert

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Stripped to Kill (1987) dir. Katt Shea; starring Kay Lenz, Greg Evigan, Norman Fell

Rented this on VHS in the ‘80s and thought it just missed being really good. A rewatch and some hindsight and this was one of the better low-budget (Roger Corman produced) neo-noirs of the era.

Sheenan (Lenz) and Heineman (Evigan) are cops working surveillance in a park. Sheenan takes off after a robber and trips over a body, just dumped from a bridge and doused with gasoline. She’s blinded by the gas and can’t stop the killer from setting the fire. Heineman just barely saves her from going up. Neither wants to give the case to homicide, and since the victim worked at the Rock Bottom club, they retain it by Sheehan going undercover as a stripper. (Of course, there are complications.)



"Sheenan takes off after a robber and trips over a body" Seems almost like the lyrics to THE SINISTER STOMP, by Bobby (Boris) Pickett:
"On a graveyard prowl late one night, I tripped over a body, and got quite a fright,
as my fear subsided, my anger grew, I proceeded to stomp with the heel of my shoe" :LOL:
 

alexvss

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The Childe (2023, dir. Park Hoon-jung). A kopino (half Korean half Filipino) is sought by his rich Korean family when his father is on the brink of death.

Park Hoon-jung is one of my favorite current directors. He directed, among others: The Witch: Part 1: The Subversion (2018), Night in Paradise (2021) and the extremely overrated V.I.P (2017). Oh, and he wrote I saw the Devil (2010), one of my favorite movies of all time.

I’m pleased to say that The Childe is one of his best.

Like his other best works, it’s a very violent thriller with psychotic villains, an underdog protagonist, and an international plot; but this one has a plot twist. There’s a lot of chase scenes, which made me think about I Saw the Devil.

One of the best Korean movies of 2023.

Strongly recommended.
 

Starbeast

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3000 Miles to Graceland (2001) - Stars: Kurt Russell, Kevin Costner & Courteney Cox. Tons of great actors in this movie about a money heist at the Riviera Casino during an Elvis impersonator convention, which turns into a suspenseful modern day western battle of greed. One of my favorite movies all time.

Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Stars: Sean Connery, Jill St. John & Charles Grey. Still great fun to watch, like the following movies.

Live and Let Die (1973) - Stars: Roger Moore, Yaphet Kotto & Jane Seymour.

The Man With the Golden Gun (1974) - Stars: Roger Moore, Christopher Lee & Britt Ekland.
 

KGeo777

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KILL OR BE KILLED 1966 - a hybrid eurowestern in the sense that it has some elements influenced by the Dollars films (the violin-playing hero wears a costume similar to Eastwood) yet still has a traditional storyline where the sheriff is honest, the bad guys wear black, and he rides off into the sunset with a homesteader bride. There is a brutal fight however--he comes into a saloon and plays the fiddle-and ends up in a fight--and he places two beer mugs on his fists (glass knuckles) so the blows register more directly.
 

Dave

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In Time (2011)
 

Jeffbert

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Joy Scouts (1939) The Our Gang boys become interested in Boy Scouts, but are rejected because they are too young. So, they start their own scouting adventure Misadventure. :LOL:

8/10, even though some of their antics are just a bit too dumb for kids of that age.
 

Jeffbert

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Man's Castle (1933) Bill (Spencer Tracy) meets a half-starved Trina (Loretta Young) and treats her to dinner at a rather upscale restaurant; then tells the manager that he has no money. The manager is about to physically toss them out, but Bill dissuades him, saying he should not want to make a scene, etc., as this might injure his business. Trina is amazed that Bill can live on virtually nothing.

So, Bill, though he attempts to part with Trina, eventually marries her. But, in actually doing occasional work, he takes a job serving a summons, he meets Fay La Rue (Glenda Farrell) a stage performer, and she becomes interested in him romantically.

An interesting pre-code Tracy film. 8/10; though only the TCM restored version. The reissued 1938 version was chopped to pieces by censors. The Wiki page says that even the TCM version has only 9 of 11 minutes restored.
 

Randy M.

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Stage Fright (1950) dir. Alfred Hitchcock; starring Jane Wyman, Marlene Dietrich, Richard Todd, Michael Wilding, Alastair Sim

Courtesy IMDB:
Det. Insp. Smith (Wilding): I once had a cousin who had an ulcer and an extremely funny face, both at the same time. Everybody laughed at him when he was telling his symptoms. His name was Jim.
Eve Gill (Wyman): That must've been terrible!
Det. Insp. Smith: Oh, I don't know, Jim is quite a common name.

Middling Hitchcock that could have used a bit more dialog of that kind. According to Eddie Muller (Turner Cable Movies, Noir Alley) Hitch had returned to England hoping to turn his fortunes around after three flops (The Paradine Case, Rope, Under Capricorn). Apparently this one didn’t quite do that, though the next one, Strangers on a Train, did.

Anyway, young student actress Eve is infatuated with Jonathan (Todd) who in turn is infatuated with married singer/actress Charlotte (Dietrich). When Charlotte’s husband is murdered, Richard becomes the suspect and Eve, suspicious of Charlotte, tries to prove him innocent by taking on the role of Charlotte’s dresser.

Some nice touches, as when, camera steady on a row of houses, we see Wilding walk along the sidewalk, a moment with no one, then Wyman trailing behind, illustrating Eve about to horn in on the police investigation. Muller complained that these are some of the dullest characters in a Hitchcock movie, and he’s not wrong, though I’d say Sim as Eve’s father is the exception, stealing every scene he’s in. But even middling Hitchcock is frequently entertaining.
 

KGeo777

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ESCAPE TO ATHENA 1979 - Goofy erratic mix of the Great Escape and the Guns of Navarone and the Dirty Dozen with a little bit of Kelly's Heroes thrown in for good measure. I think there's even influence of Cabaret too. If you want to see Roger Moore's attempt at a German accent, Telly Savalas speaking Greek, Sonny Bono pretending to sing opera, Stephanie Powers swimming under a U-boat, or just picturesque Greek island scenery, it may be of some interest.
 

Jeffbert

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Anzio (1968) WWII action film, details not only the invasion by sea, but, also the land action. Reaching the dry land without anything resembling enemy opposition, the American forces find the place open. Moving North, they are overly cautious, expecting to encounter ambushes, etc., and any moment. But three, count 'em, 3 guys in a jeep rolled all the way into Rome, and found just a handful of enemies, whom they were able to sneak around.

Dick Ennis (Robert Mitchum) is a war correspondent, who accompanied the American Forces, and eventually entered the battle with them. Corporal Jack Rabinoff (Peter Falk) They are two of the three guys in the jeep.

AS a result of the General's overly cautious approach, the enemy was able to deploy a very significant defense of Rome, costing many Allied casualties.

The film, in its 1st half, shows action on both sides, but eventually stays with the Army Rangers who invaded and turned North.

Supporting cast includes Robert Ryan as a General, Earl Holliman as Sergeant Abe Stimmler, one of the few enlisted men who was seen frequently with Ennis, & Wolfgang Preiss as General Kesselring.

8/10, mainly for its focus on the guys down in the dirt, while spending a few moments on the brass. I thought it was fairly balanced.
 

Jeffbert

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One Minute to Zero (1952) A Korean war film that details the early stages of the war.

Col. Steve Janowski (Robert Mitchum) is a no-nonsense highly experienced soldier who is in South Korea just before the start of the war. He observes training of South Korean forces, and notes the tactics are poor, as are everything else about them.

Linda Day (Ann Blyth) is a U.N. who ends up helping refugees, as the start of the war takes them by surprise. She is disgusted by what she perceives as the callous tactics deployed against the North Koreans who are among the refugees, holds guns to their backs forcing them to move southward, in the hope that the North will be able to attack the American soldiers, if they can get close enough.

The plight of such refugees was very heartrending.

The film used a combination of small American tanks with unbelievably large guns, as North Korean tanks, and actual stock film of burning T-34s.

The American control of the air was overwhelming, raining bombs and missiles on the North Korean forces.

Supporting cast includes Charles McGraw as a Sergeant.


8/10
 

Parson

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I watch Greyhound (2020) last night (Apple+), starring Tom Hanks. This was a real gem of a movie. It's a must see for everyone who likes realistic military action with a minimum of dialogue. In fact I would say that the dialogue in this movie was less than "spare." Another great thing about it is that it was not messed up by a lot of interpersonal dynamics. It uses its 90 minutes (they can make a movie only 90 min. long?! Let's have more of this please!!!) in the best possible way.

I think it's main weakness is that you have to really be inside the head of Commander Ernest Kruse to get the fullness of what's being portrayed. But Tom Hanks makes this easy, or at least it was for me. What's being portrayed is based on the true story of the Battle of the Atlantic in WWII and on the book by C. S. Forrester The Good Shepherd. As this story was grows the cost of human lives, both Allied and German weighs heavily on Kruse, who is portrayed as man who leans into his Christian faith. I do not know how realistic the portrayal was, but I suspect quite realistic. If that's so the Allied high command would have portrayed this encounter a victory, but Kruse clearly would not consider this a victory because of the high cost.

Avoid --- Not Recommended --- Flawed --- Okay --- Good --- Recommended --- Shouldn’t be Missed
 

Matteo

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 Salt. A.K.A. Angelina Jolie Runs a Lot.

Terrible film. I think it was trying to be clever (with twists in the story). If so, it failed. Just a "paint by numbers action film".
 

alexvss

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Empire of the Sun (1987). The real story of a British boy who went from his rich life in Shanghai to prisoner of war in an internment camp.

Directed by Spielberg, this is Christian Bale’s debut. He plays a hyperactive, gifted boy that, I suspect, at least has ADHD. I like the way he carried his life: always with extreme joy, even amid all the adversities (although I admit it gets weird sometimes).

I like the Pacific Theater, but I didn’t know about the particular events portrayed in this movie. So I appreciate the history lesson.

Nice piece of history and fiction alike.

Recommended.
 

hitmouse

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Empire of the Sun (1987). The real story of a British boy who went from his rich life in Shanghai to prisoner of war in an internment camp.

Directed by Spielberg, this is Christian Bale’s debut. He plays a hyperactive, gifted boy that, I suspect, at least has ADHD. I like the way he carried his life: always with extreme joy, even amid all the adversities (although I admit it gets weird sometimes).

I like the Pacific Theater, but I didn’t know about the particular events portrayed in this movie. So I appreciate the history lesson.

Nice piece of history and fiction alike.

Recommended.
The boy, Jim, is JG Ballard, the SF writer. The film is based on his book of the same title, which is a fictionalised account of his time in a POW camp in China.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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Catholics (1978)

Made-for-TV adaptation of the novella of the same name by Brian Moore, who also wrote the screenplay. (Our cheap DVD version had the title The Catholics for some reason, and apparently it has also been called Conflict and The Visitor.)

At a time in the future when the Catholic Church has undergone radical reformation, an American priest representing higher authorities is sent to a remote Irish island where the monks practice the old ways. It follows the novella extremely closely.; so much so that I suspect folks who have not read it would be a bit confused. Nicely filmed and acted, and pretty much a two-character drama, heavy on dialogue.
 

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