What was the last movie you saw?

Jeffbert

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FF nudity in a 1956 American movie? Are you sure? As far as anyone knows American female pubic hair was invented by Bob Guccione in the late 60s. Sure you're not thinking of the 1984 version of 1984? There was in that one.

Tonight I watched The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) - with Number One Son. Rathbone is my Holmes.
I have seen both, it could be that I have confused them. That, & I thought the 1956 version was made in the UK.
 

paranoid marvin

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FF nudity in a 1956 American movie? Are you sure? As far as anyone knows American female pubic hair was invented by Bob Guccione in the late 60s. Sure you're not thinking of the 1984 version of 1984? There was in that one.

Tonight I watched The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1939) - with Number One Son. Rathbone is my Holmes.


Yes, Rathbone was a great Holmes, and although Watson is nothing like ACD's, he brings some welcome comic relief. I do think though that 'Adventures' is probably the weakest of them.
 

Victoria Silverwolf

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An Idle Mind is the Devil's Playground (2016)

Set in 1960 and filmed in black-and-white, this seems to be a deliberate pastiche of spooky stuff of that time period. Twilight Zone meets Alfred Hitchcock Presents, if you like.

Reclusive musician spends his time playing his Theremin. People in his dreams come to life. But he's on medications for mental illness. Are they real or hallucinations? Then there's a twist ending.

More of a curiosity than anything else.
 

KGeo777

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HOUSE OF MORTAL SIN - 1976 - Girl goes to make confession by mistake and encounters a loony priest who begins stalking her--and her family doesn't believe it. Obvious effort to emulate a Hammer film, but making the monster a sex-starved priest instead of a blood-starved vampire. The music is effective at giving it a Hammer feeling yet I didn't find it coherent enough to work in the end.
 

JunkMonkey

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HOUSE OF MORTAL SIN - 1976 - Girl goes to make confession by mistake and encounters a loony priest who begins stalking her--and her family doesn't believe it. Obvious effort to emulate a Hammer film, but making the monster a sex-starved priest instead of a blood-starved vampire. The music is effective at giving it a Hammer feeling yet I didn't find it coherent enough to work in the end.

'Coherence' is not the first word that comes to my mind when I think of Peter Walkers' films but there is a weird, cheap nastyness to them I like despite my not usually really liking cheap nasty horror.
His House of Whipcord is one of the odder Women in Prison movies I've seen, and Frightmare (the one with the nice old lady drilling holes in people's heads with a spade bit - somehow so much more disturbing than a normal drill bit) is just great - for a cheap nasty film of the kind I don't particularly like.
 

Randy M.

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It opened with a girl reading a book, The Chthulu Mythos by H. P. Lovecraft. I don't think Lovecraft ever wrote such a book. It came later...
Not a deal breaker for me. HPL would be hard to film as is. My favorite of the ones I've seen is The Ressurected with Chris Sarandon, John Terry and Jane Sibbet. It's a good adaptation of its source material, The Case of Charles Dexter Ward.
 

JunkMonkey

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Yes, Rathbone was a great Holmes, and although Watson is nothing like ACD's, he brings some welcome comic relief. I do think though that 'Adventures' is probably the weakest of them.

Totally agree not like the capable ex colonial army officer of the books but beautifully portrayed. My son who is 14, and not a great movie watcher by any means, said to me at the end - "That's the way to do a comic relief character, not making jokes all the time." For a 14 year old boy who would spend his entire life in front of a console he sometimes has these odd moments of insight which give me hope.
 

paranoid marvin

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Totally agree not like the capable ex colonial army officer of the books but beautifully portrayed. My son who is 14, and not a great movie watcher by any means, said to me at the end - "That's the way to do a comic relief character, not making jokes all the time." For a 14 year old boy who would spend his entire life in front of a console he sometimes has these odd moments of insight which give me hope.


His conversation with an owl (House of Fear) and the reverse interrogation on a train (Terror by Night) were both classic moments.

Most of the movies were made in WWII, when the outcome was still in the balance, and the bad guys (Inc Moriarty) as Nazis or German spies or fifth columnists worked really well. Yes, there was inevitable flag waving, but it didn't get in the way of the movies.

At the beginning of Voice of Terror there is a brief explanation about the transfer of the stories from a Victorian setting to more contemporary, with mention that Sherlock is an ageless story.

I think Terror by Night is my favourite. Its just a shame that its not received a 4k restoration.
 

Pyan

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Men in Black International.
Gave up after about half an hour. Just not the same without Tommy Lee Jones and/or Will Smith.
 

pogopossum

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Watched Out Of Time.(2021) on Amazon.
A cheapie cop vs. aliens story, probably originally streamed.
Has good suitably creepy atmospherics. Both the present day woman cop and the Fibber chasing the aliens from 1950 are well done. The aliens are suitably menacing although their powers/tech are a little unrealistic - as are their susceptibility to gunshots and to a good right to the jaw.
One of the better conflicts is the fairly sensitive detective from the past dealing with both technology and a (he realizes almost immediately) very capable woman cop. For a cheapie, quite good.
Found two reviews. Like me they both thought the film was good but not great. Both thought that the aliens were a little goofy for the threat that they comprised.
 

Randy M.

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Talking of which, I just received the HPL Omnibus book 1 which includes that novel
Just to mention, while I like the story -- really a short novel -- there are many who find it deadly slow. For me, the concept is fascinating enough to keep me reading.
 

Randy M.

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Stripped to Kill (1987) dir. Katt Shea; starring Kay Lenz, Greg Evigan, Norman Fell

Rented this on VHS in the ‘80s and thought it just missed being really good. A rewatch and some hindsight and this was one of the better low-budget (Roger Corman produced) neo-noirs of the era.

Sheenan (Lenz) and Heineman (Evigan) are cops working surveillance in a park. Sheenan takes off after a robber and trips over a body, just dumped from a bridge and doused with gasoline. She’s blinded by the gas and can’t stop the killer from setting the fire. Heineman just barely saves her from going up. Neither wants to give the case to homicide, and since the victim worked at the Rock Bottom club, they retain it by Sheehan going undercover as a stripper. (Of course, there are complications.)

Several dance scenes, most of them Flashdance inspired, require a sizable stage. Rock Bottom doesn’t appear that high-end, but ignore that and, unusual for this kind of movie, the dances, the dialog, and some individual scenes allow each dancer a chance to create character and have a personality. That makes it easy to believe Sheenan becomes protective of them and even of the owner (Fell) who’s a tough businessman, but not uncaring.

Not a great movie; its ending is problematic, first because a chase scene slips toward slasher movie implausibility (its nightmarish quality mitigates some); second, because the (very ‘80s) portrayal of the villain is objectionable, though saying why would give too much away (Wikipedia tells a little more). Also, there’s a romance that fits an obvious pattern, but the direction is crisp and the dialog smart (Shea was one of the writers). Evigan as a tough cop didn’t work for me in the ‘80s – I associated him with a goofy TV show – but on second viewing he’s fine, and he and Lenz work well together, especially when trading quips/insults. Lenz has worked continuously in TV since the early ‘70s, but feature films have been iffier. Still, this was a substantive role and she easily pulls off the glamming up and dancing, but also makes believable the dressed down, tired detective pulling double duty.

On the whole, late on a Friday or Saturday night this is pretty good and about as respectable as an ‘80s exploitation movie can be. In spite of not caring for Shea’s other big movie (Poison Ivy), given what she did here, I wonder that she hasn’t gotten more opportunities to direct over the years.
 

KGeo777

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HOUSE OF WAX 1953 - How many times I watched this and thought "that assistant who looks like a young Charles Bronson." I never assumed it was him because he was using Buchinsky in the credits and he didn't speak and he is made up to look so gaunt. I notice he was in the scenes with ping pong guy. "There's someone with a bag of popcorn! Close your mouth, it's the bag I'm aiming at, not your tonsils! Here she comes! Well, look at that-it's in the bag!"
 

alexvss

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Monster (2023, dir. Hirokazu Kore-eda). The story of two boys victims of bullying in school, seen by multiple POVs.

The newest film by Hirokazu Kore-eda. I know him from Shoplifters (2018), which won the Palme D’or; the South Korean movie Broker (2022); Air Doll (2009), starring Bae Donna as the title character; and the cult classic thriller Maboroshi (1995).

Found-family is the most prominent theme of his movies, and they’re all uplifting, family-friendly movies. Monster deviates from that approach: it’s still about family, but with a much darker tone, and not for everyone.

The idea of showing the drama of the two boys in more than one perspective is great: everything we thought we knew about the story crumbles when the POVs shift. The text is also full of metaphors and it respects its audience. And it all builds-up to a great ending.

Recommended.
 

alexvss

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Past Lives (2023, dir. Celine Song). Separated for 24 years, a couple of best friends reunite, and they wonder how their lives would’ve been if the woman hadn’t left the country in the pursuit of her dream.

A very down-to-Earth romance, the kind I’ve never seen in movies (with the exception of Garden of words (2013)). It avoids clichés and it avoids spectacle. Watch this if you don’t like cliché’d romances.

However, it’s overrated. It’s not bad by any means, but the multiple nominations set the expectations too high. It does resonate with me though: to leave everything behind to go after your dreams is something I did, and still intend to do. And I’d watch it anyway: it’s a combination of my favorite country for cinema (Korea) and my favorite production company (A24).

Recommended.
 

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