What was the last movie you saw?

therapist

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American Beauty (1999) Decided to rewatch this, and it was much better than I remember. Every character has so much nuance, depth, and intrigue. 10/10
 

Guttersnipe

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Thelma (2017): A Norwegian supernatural thriller concerning a young woman who can teleport people, albeit accidentally. It was satisfactory.

The Innocents (2021): Another Norwegian supernatural thriller, written and directed by the same person who made Thelma. A group of children toy with telekinesis and telepathy. Not for the faint of heart; in one scene, a cat is dropped from a very high spot and is then killed in a very sick way.

Nope (2022): A Jordan Peele feature, a sci-fi horror. Two adult siblings on a horse ranch attempt to gather footage of a flying saucer. This is the one I've been waiting for, but I honestly felt let down. It's okay, but nowhere near as good as his other films.
 
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Rodders

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The two Norwegian movies sound pretty interesting. I sometimes thing foreign movies are so refreshing.
 

Randy M.

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The Lost Continent (1968; dir. Michael Carreras; starring Eric Porter, Hildegard Knef; Suzanna Leigh)

I recall seeing this in my late teens or early 20s and thinking the best special effect was Dana Gillespie. Watching it 40+ years later, I'm still inclined to think so, though the ships and sea scenes hold up pretty well (nicely obscured by fog as they often are), even as the monsters show their fabric-y essence.

Story: Ship carrying highly explosive canisters springs a leak, loses power, crew mutinies trying to abandon ship followed by much hubbub. After some fighting and not being able to regain power, the captain concludes abandoning ship isn't a bad idea. Their lifeboat drifts into seaweed that wants to eat them. Further drifting finds them back at the ship, now caught in the seaweed and being dragged into an old ship graveyard where other survivors live -- Gillespie for one -- some of them descended from Spanish Conquistadors and having formed an odd God-fearing society led by a teenager. As we've all seen, teenagers are known for their rationality and leadership abilities. Uh huh. Most famous scenes from the movie include survivors walking across the seaweed buoyed by balloons and wearing water-wing galoshes (feel free to offer a better description).

Based on a Dennis Wheatley novel (one scene shows a passenger reading a Wheatley novel) who appears to have been doing his William Hope Hodgson impression, it's really not a bad movie if you're in the mood for a non-Victorian Hammer production which usually means a low budget but pretty good acting.
 

JunkMonkey

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The Lost Continent (1968; dir. Michael Carreras; starring Eric Porter, Hildegard Knef; Suzanna Leigh)

I recall seeing this in my late teens or early 20s and thinking the best special effect was Dana Gillespie. Watching it 40+ years later, I'm still inclined to think so, though the ships and sea scenes hold up pretty well (nicely obscured by fog as they often are), even as the monsters show their fabric-y essence.

676e67dc9a8a6296699ac4d89505fe61.jpg


I'm sold!
 

Raz2k13

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Netflix's Crawl is pretty entertaining (alligators instead of crocodiles, but still...).
I watched that one on the big screen. It was a roller coaster and had me on the edge of my seat. I love EVERYTHING to do with gators and sharks (unless it's something like Sharknado). I want to actually go to Australia and do the tube where you swim with the gators!
 

Raz2k13

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I bet that was pretty exciting! I saw it on a laptop and it was exciting enough. To be honest I only watched it because (a) big lizards and (b) good-looking lead, but it turned out to be a pretty decent film.
What more does one really need in life? Big lizards and good looking cast? I could get by pretty well with that!
 

KGeo777

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The Lost Continent (1968; dir. Michael Carreras; starring Eric Porter, Hildegard Knef; Suzanna Leigh)
El Supremo is stronger than all! All of you will soon know the iron hand of El Supremo!

One of those movies that manages to squeeze in everything, including a kitchen sink (we do get to see a close up of a sink).
 

BAYLOR

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The Lost Continent (1968; dir. Michael Carreras; starring Eric Porter, Hildegard Knef; Suzanna Leigh)

I recall seeing this in my late teens or early 20s and thinking the best special effect was Dana Gillespie. Watching it 40+ years later, I'm still inclined to think so, though the ships and sea scenes hold up pretty well (nicely obscured by fog as they often are), even as the monsters show their fabric-y essence.

Story: Ship carrying highly explosive canisters springs a leak, loses power, crew mutinies trying to abandon ship followed by much hubbub. After some fighting and not being able to regain power, the captain concludes abandoning ship isn't a bad idea. Their lifeboat drifts into seaweed that wants to eat them. Further drifting finds them back at the ship, now caught in the seaweed and being dragged into an old ship graveyard where other survivors live -- Gillespie for one -- some of them descended from Spanish Conquistadors and having formed an odd God-fearing society led by a teenager. As we've all seen, teenagers are known for their rationality and leadership abilities. Uh huh. Most famous scenes from the movie include survivors walking across the seaweed buoyed by balloons and wearing water-wing galoshes (feel free to offer a better description).

Based on a Dennis Wheatley novel (one scene shows a passenger reading a Wheatley novel) who appears to have been doing his William Hope Hodgson impression, it's really not a bad movie if you're in the mood for a non-Victorian Hammer production which usually means a low budget but pretty good acting.

I thought the man-eating seaweed was a nice touch.
 

paranoid marvin

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Thanks for a number of suggestions that have been made recently that have got me dipping into the archives.

Jabberwocky - what an entertaining movie, and one I haven't seen for some time. And what a wonderful array of British comedic talent from John Le Mesurier to Harry H Corbett . and even a brief (and very funny) bit by Gorden Kaye - and David Prowse as the Black Knight! And I agree - how on earth movie ever made it through as a PG I'll never know.
 

paranoid marvin

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Ghostbusters :Afterlife

I'm still undecided. It felt mainly like a cross between The Goonies and Stranger Things - which is (mainly) a good thing. The funny bits were mainly funny, and perhaps the only disappointment was the original crew turning up at the end - it didn't really fit in with the rest of the story and felt forced and contrived (which it obviously was). Although the out-take with Dana and Venkman at the end showed that the old chemistry is still their. The kids without the original GB team worked, and I think that the original team without the kids would work; but they didn't seem to gel well as a combination.

One thing I would say for sure is that it's about 30 minutes too long, and a trimmed down, sharpened up cut of the movie could work wonders. Overall though, it wasn't a disappointment, which given the last movie, it easily could have been.
 

Jeffbert

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The Lost Continent (1968; dir. Michael Carreras; starring Eric Porter, Hildegard Knef; Suzanna Leigh)

I recall seeing this in my late teens or early 20s and thinking the best special effect was Dana Gillespie. Watching it 40+ years later, I'm still inclined to think so, though the ships and sea scenes hold up pretty well (nicely obscured by fog as they often are), even as the monsters show their fabric-y essence.

Story: Ship carrying highly explosive canisters springs a leak, loses power, crew mutinies trying to abandon ship followed by much hubbub. After some fighting and not being able to regain power, the captain concludes abandoning ship isn't a bad idea. Their lifeboat drifts into seaweed that wants to eat them. Further drifting finds them back at the ship, now caught in the seaweed and being dragged into an old ship graveyard where other survivors live -- Gillespie for one -- some of them descended from Spanish Conquistadors and having formed an odd God-fearing society led by a teenager. As we've all seen, teenagers are known for their rationality and leadership abilities. Uh huh. Most famous scenes from the movie include survivors walking across the seaweed buoyed by balloons and wearing water-wing galoshes (feel free to offer a better description).

Based on a Dennis Wheatley novel (one scene shows a passenger reading a Wheatley novel) who appears to have been doing his William Hope Hodgson impression, it's really not a bad movie if you're in the mood for a non-Victorian Hammer production which usually means a low budget but pretty good acting.
I saw that one, though it was several years ago. Liked it.
 

Jeffbert

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THE REAR GUNNER (1943) This film seems aimed at encouraging young men to join the military; though, with some 15,000,000+ men under arms, I cannot understand why it was needed.
Pvt. L.A. "Pee Wee" Williams (Burgess Meredith; the Penguin), because of his small stature, was just the right size for the cramped rear gunner position on a bomber.

Interesting views of the planes & equipment. <30 minutes.
 

Guttersnipe

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The two Norwegian movies sound pretty interesting. I sometimes thing foreign movies are so refreshing.
Trollhunter (Trolljegeren) is my favorite Norwegian film I've seen so far. For other Scandinavian films, I suggest Border (Swedish: Gräns) and The Hunt (Danish: Jagten). The latter stars the very talented Mads Mikkelsen.
 
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Foxbat

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The Monster From The Ocean Floor (1954)
A by the numbers creature feature with some poor sound mixing. You only get what you pay for so it's pretty much what you'd expect from Roger Corman (and he obviously didn't pay much).
 

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